Preparing for educating all students (eas) academic literacy skills test (alst) April 2, 2014



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PREPARING FOR EDUCATING ALL STUDENTS (EAS) ACADEMIC LITERACY SKILLS TEST (ALST) April 2, 2014

AGENDA FOR WEBINAR

  • EAS
    • Content
    • Reading and Problem-Solving Format
    • Constructed Response Format
  • ALST
    • Content
    • Reading and Problem-Solving for Context, Purpose, Meaning
    • Writing to Sources
  •  Questions and Answers

EAS CONTENT

  • Diverse Student Populations
      • 11 Multiple Choice worth 18%;
      • 1 Constructed Question worth 10%
  • English Language Learners
  • 11 Multiple Choice worth 18%;
  • 1 Constructed Question worth 10%
  • Students with Disabilities
  • 10 Multiple Choice worth 18%;
  • 1 Constructed Question worth 10%

EAS CONTENT

  • Teacher Responsibilities
      • 5 Multiple Choice worth 8%;
  • School-Home Relationships
  • 5 Multiple Choice worth 8%;
  • 135 Minutes (105 for Multiple Choice and 30 for Constructed Questions)

Culturally Responsive Teaching

  • Culturally Responsive Teaching
    • Ladson-Billings, Gay, Banks
    • ASCD, Brown/Educational Alliance
  • Social Justice Education
    • Freire, Hackman, Lipman
  • DIFFERENTIATED TEACHING

BICS vs. CALP

  • BICS vs. CALP
  • 1st vs. 2nd Language Proficiency
  • Comprehensible Input/Output
  • SIFE/Knowledge Gaps
  • NYSESLAT (Scoring)
    • Cummins, Krashen, Hakuta,
  • Sheltered Instruction
  • Progressions/Common Core
    • Colorîn Colorado, Judi Haynes, EngageNY

Response to Intervention

  • Response to Intervention
    • National Center Website (2nd Language)
  • Individualized Educational Plan
    • Center of Parent Information and Resources http://www.parentcenterhub.org/repository/iep-overview/
  • Behavioral Intervention Plans
    • http://www.p12.nysed.gov/specialed/publications/topicalbriefs/BIP.htm
  • DIFFERENTIATED TEACHING

Charlotte Danielson: Domain 4 (A & B)

  • Charlotte Danielson: Domain 4 (A & B)
    • Reflection and Record-Keeping
  • Quality of Effective Teachers (Stronge)
  • Joyce Epstein: Six Types of Involvement
  • Ruby Payne: A Framework for Understanding Poverty

Problem-Solving Format

  • Case Study Material
    • Description
    • Teacher Journals
    • Lessons
  • Ill-Defined Problems
    • No One Answer is Clearly Right
    • Solutions Found In The Language and Assumptions Being Made

General Problem-Solving Strategies

  • Read the Questions First Before Reading the Case Study Material
  • Read the Choices First Before Reading the Case Study Material
  • Write Down Key Words or Phrases from Questions/Choices on White Board Before Reading
  • OVERALL, DO THE CONSTRUCTED ITEMS BEFORE THE MULTIPLE CHOICE ITEMS!

EXAMPLE QUESTION FROM EAS TEST

  • 3. Which of the following tasks would be the most appropriate and effective method for informally assessing student learning in Ms. Finnegan's lesson on distinguishing between fact and opinion?
  • A. Student groups evaluate their performance on the small-group activities on fact and opinion.
  • B. Individual students use different colors to highlight facts and opinions in a passage on a familiar topic.
  • C. Pairs of students test each other's knowledge of fact and opinion using textbook passages.
  • D. The teacher observes student groups as they perform the small-group activities on fact and opinion.

First Student Response…

  • D. The teacher observes student groups as they perform the small-group activities on fact and opinion.
  • I selected “D” because I believe observation is a valuable way to assess students' learning. By circulating the classroom, teachers have the ability to listen to their students' conversations and ask questions to determine the reasoning behind their thought processes. If teachers have an understanding of their students' thinking, they can better support those who need additional teaching or greater challenge.

Second Student Response…

  • B. Individual students use different colors to highlight facts and opinions in a passage on a familiar topic.
    • While self-evaluation and informal observation (Choices A and D) are critical in assessment, B is the only answer in which students are distinctly asked to identify fact and opinion. This choice was a good answer, in my opinion, because it allows for the data collection of each student and provides tangible data in regards to the highlighted sections of the passage.

ANSWER!

  • B. Informal assessment of student learning is often accomplished through performance-type tasks that must be completed by individual students. In this way, the teacher can gain a more accurate measure of every student's understanding and ensure that students who need additional teaching or support are not overlooked because they performed a task as part of a group.

WHAT MAKES IT THE ANSWER?

  • PERFORMANCE-BASED?
  • INDIVIDUAL ASSESSMENT?
  • ACCURACY?

ADDITIONAL STRATEGIES

  • PAY ATTENTION TO SIMILARITIES AND DIFFERENCES IN THE QUESTION OR CHOICES
    • All of the choices except B involved group or pair work
    • The question was about teacher assessment; A and C are about peer assessment
    • PAY ATTENTION TO emphasis in case study (diverse learners)

CONSTRUCTED RESPONSES ON THE EAS

  • Short (150-200 words)
  • “Analytic” responses
  • Based on case study material
  • Responses to bulleted requests

STRATEGIES FOR CONSTRUCTED RESPONSES

  • Read the constructed questions first before reading the case study material
  • Write down key words/phrases before reading case study material
  • Answer each of the bullets
  • Give evidence in your responses

AN EXAMPLE FROM THE EAS

  • 5. After analyzing the information provided, write a response of approximately 150–200 words in which you:
  • identify one issue related to student diversity that Ms. Finnegan should address in her instructional planning related to this lesson;
  • describe one strategy Ms. Finnegan could use to address the issue you identified; and
  • explain why the strategy you described would be effective in facilitating student learning.
  • The final version of your response should conform to the conventions of edited American English.

First Student Response…

  • One issue related to student diversity that Ms. Finnegan should address in her instructional planning for her lesson on fact and opinion is her students' interactions with one another while working in small groups. Ms. Finnegan is aware that her students are reluctant to interact with peers from backgrounds different from their own; however, Ms. Finnegan expects collaboration amongst her students, so she may want to consider incorporating a form of cooperative learning to ensure each student has an opportunity to contribute to his/her group's discussion.

Second Student Response…

  • One issue related to student diversity that Ms. Finnegan should address in planning is the selection of instructional materials that are culturally responsive and inclusive of all students. For example, in her lesson on Monday, September 12, Ms. Finnegan wrote in her journal that the class discussed “a magazine article about a popular musician.” In order to provide students with a meaningful connection to the material, it would be beneficial for students to read about a musician with whom they are familiar or whose music they enjoy. Giving all students the same musician fails to take into account their different preferences and exposure to music.

SCORING OF CONSTRUCTED RESPONSES

  • CONTENT
    • The extent to which the response meets the requirements of the assignment
    • ANALYSIS, SYNTHESIS, AND APPLICATION OF PEDAGOGICAL PRINCIPLES
    • The extent to which the response demonstrates understanding of and engagement with the provided exhibits
    • COMMAND OF EVIDENCE
    • The extent to which the response presents relevant support

ALST CONTENT

  • READING
    • 40 MULTIPLE CHOICE ITEMS FOR 5 PASSAGES
    • 40% of OVERALL SCORE
    • 110 MINUTES
  • WRITING (ARGUMENTATION)
    • 2 SHORTER RESPONSES/1 EXTENDED RESPONSE
    • 60% of OVERALL SCORE
    • 1 HOUR FOR EXTENDED; 20 MINUTES (EACH) FOR SHORTER RESPONSES

ALST CONTENT

  • READING
    • Complex texts broken down by paragraphs (e.g. Gertrude Stein)
    • Logical inferences/conclusions from evidence; determining central theme/idea; how/why individuals or ideas interact over a text; interpret words/phrases within context and with each other; author’s point of view
  • WRITING
    • Argumentation with DBQs
    • Mostly social studies-related topics (e.g. energy, economy, environment, health)
    • Interpretation of graphs, charts and tables

GENERAL STRATEGIES OF ALST

  • Read the Questions First Before Reading the Related Text (Split Screen; numbered paragraphs)
  • Read the Choices First Before Reading the Related Text
  • Write Down Key Words or Phrases from Questions/Choices on White Board Before Reading
  • OVERALL, DO THE WRITTEN RESPONSES BEFORE THE MULTIPLE CHOICE ITEMS!

EXAMPLE OF READING FROM ALST

  • It was a well-rounded, prosperous, comfortable beginning, one intended to produce a well-rounded, prosperous life with all the usual accoutrements of family, stability, and friends. In fact, however, it produced a woman who was to become one of the most important aesthetic arbiters of her day. Stein caught a taste for Europe early and realized quickly that she would never be at home in the United States. "America is my birthplace," she later observed, "but Paris is my home town." It wasn't only that the puritanical traditions of American life chafed against her modern sensibility and bohemian habits; it was also that Europe was where she was most likely to see what interested her most: a collision between old and new.

EXAMPLE OF READING FROM ALST

  • In Paragraph 1, the repetition of the phrase "well-rounded, prosperous" emphasizes
  • the sophistication of Stein's family
  • the predictability of the life Stein rejected
  • the flowering of Stein's creative powers
  • the contempt for convention Stein embodied

FIRST STUDENT RESPONSE

  • (A. the sophistication of Stein's family) I chose “A” because the passage states, “It was a well-rounded, prosperous, comfortable beginning, one intended to produce a well-rounded, prosperous life with all the usual accoutrements of family, stability, and friends.” I thought this was in reference to Stein's family because of the ending to this quote (“...the usual accoutrements of family, stability, and friends.”) and because Paragraph 1 describes her father and childhood in detail. The other choices did not seem to answer this question as well as this choice did.

SECOND STUDENT RESPONSE

    • (A. the sophistication of Stein's family) I chose A because I felt that the repetition of the phrase showed just how “prosperous” and how “well-rounded” life could be. Therefore, I felt that A was the best choice since I felt that the repetition served as a means of emphasizing the sophistication and potential of living.

ANSWER!

  • In Paragraph 1, the repetition of the phrase "well-rounded, prosperous" emphasizes
  • the predictability of the life Stein rejected
  • This item requires examinees to analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone. In Paragraph 1, the author's repetition of the phrase "well-rounded, prosperous" focuses attention on the stable, orderly world that Stein left behind when she decided to pursue her fascination with the "collision between old and new" models of living in Europe.

Question-Specific Strategies for ALST

  • Don’t over-rely on vocabulary knowledge; instead, focus on meaning in context
  • Emphasize quoted material in choice BUT the overall theme of the paragraph should be addressed
  • Ensure that there is evidence in the paragraph that relates to the choice
  • USE LAST GUIDES?

Writing to Sources (Argumentation)

Writing to Sources (Argumentation)

Writing to Sources (Argumentation)

Writing to Sources (Argumentation)

Written Response on ALST

  • Should the production of corn ethanol in the United States be expanded or reduced?
  • In an essay in your own words of approximately 400–600 words, present a fully developed argument that introduces and supports a claim assessing the benefits and risks of U.S. corn ethanol production. Your argument must:
  • include a knowledgeable claim that demonstrates an understanding of the topic;
  • use valid reasoning that draws on and extends the arguments in the sources provided;
  • support your claim with relevant and sufficient evidence from all three sources; and
  • anticipate and address at least one counterclaim.

Shorter Written Response on ALST

  • In a response of approximately 100–200 words, explain how the information presented in the pie charts can be integrated with the author's central argument about the impact of converting corn to ethanol in Passage B. Your response must:
  • explain how specific information presented in the pie charts either supports or counters the author's claims, reasoning, and evidence with regard to the conversion of corn to ethanol; and
  • include examples from the passage and the pie charts to support your explanation.

Student Response…

  • According to the information presented in the pie charts, increasing the amount of ethanol used in gasoline by an additional 4.0% from 2005/2006 to 2016/2017 will impact the agricultural sector. By 2016/2017, the amount of ethanol used will account for over 30% of corn use. In the passage, the author posits that higher corn prices result in “less acreage and agricultural inputs for other crops.” The statistical information helps to support this by showing the percent of exports decreasing from 19% to 16% from 2005/2006 to 2016/2017, respectively. This supports the point in the article that an increase of corn production into biofuels will lead to the “diversion of larger portions of corn supply to fuel, leaving less for food.” Further, the author mentions that this increased use of corn will take “more than one-tenth of the global food supply off the market for food and feed.” The pie charts illustrate the percentage of ethanol used for feed and residual is projected to decrease from 55% to 42%. Overall, the information from the pie charts provides clear support for the points made in the author’s argument. (Word Count: 186)

SCORING OF WRITING ON ALST: EXTENDED

  • CONTENT AND ANALYSIS
  • The extent to which the response conveys complex ideas and information clearly and accurately in order to support claims in an analysis of topics and sources
  • COMMAND OF EVIDENCE
  • The extent to which the response presents evidence from the provided sources to support analysis and synthesis
  • COHERENCE, ORGANIZATION, AND STYLE
  • The extent to which the response logically organizes complex ideas, concepts, and information using formal style and precise language
  • CONTROL OF CONVENTIONS
  • The extent to which the response demonstrates command of the conventions of standard written English grammar, usage, capitalization, punctuation, and spelling

SCORING OF WRITING ON ALST: FOCUSED (SHORTER)

  • CONTENT
  • The extent to which the response meets the requirements of the assignment
  • ANALYSIS, EVALUATION, AND INTEGRATION
  • The extent to which the response demonstrates understanding of and engagement with the provided sources
  • COMMAND OF EVIDENCE
  • The extent to which the response presents evidence from the provided sources to support analysis and synthesis
  • COHERENCE AND CLARITY
  • The extent to which the response is focused and clear

THANK YOU!!!



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