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INT 101 Formal Essay #4 : An Annotated Bibliography – 100 points

Due by Tuesday, November 28th, 11:59 PM
What is an Annotated Bibliography?
An annotated bibliography is a list of citations to books, articles, and other resources. Each citation is followed by a brief descriptive and evaluative paragraph: the annotation. The purpose of the annotation is to inform the reader of the relevance, accuracy, and quality of the sources cited. Annotations are usually about 150 words.
Annotations vs. Abstracts
Abstracts are the descriptive summaries often found at the beginning of scholarly journal articles or in subscription databases. Annotations, on the other hand, are descriptive and critical; they discuss the author's point of view, clarity, appropriateness of expression, authority, etc.
The Process
Creating an annotated bibliography calls for the application of a variety of intellectual skills: concise writing, succinct analysis, and informed library research. You will be retrieving websites, popular magazines and/or scholarly journal articles, and books relevant to a selected topic. You will create citations for these resources using the Modern Language Association (MLA) format. You will write concise annotations that summarize the central theme and scope of the websites, articles, and books. These annotations should include 2 – 3 paragraphs related to the topics below.
1. Evaluate the authority, background, and education of the author(s).

2. Comment on the intended audience. For whom was it written (general public/any reader, subject

specialists, college students)? What skill level or education level must the reader have?

3. Discuss how this work is relevant to your selected topic.

4. Evaluate the quality of scholarship in a book or article.  You might want to consider the logic of authors'

arguments, and the quality of their evidence.  Your findings can be positive, negative, or mixed.

5. Compare and/or contrast to any other works you are citing or have read before.
Example Annotation
London, Herbert. "Five Myths of the Television Age." Library Quarterly 10.1 (2008): 81-89. Print.
Herbert London, the Dean of Journalism at New York University and author of several books and articles about the television industry, explains how television contradicts five commonly believed ideas. He uses specific examples of events seen on television, such as the assassination of John Kennedy, to illustrate his points. His examples have been selected to contradict such truisms as: "seeing is believing"; "a picture is worth a thousand words"; and "satisfaction is its own reward."
London uses logical arguments to support his ideas. He does not refer to any previous works on the topic. London's style and vocabulary would make the article of interest to any reader. In comparison to Smith’s article, this source was easier to understand and more relevant to my specific topic.
See Pages 66 – 70 in your Little Bear Handbook for more information on Annotated Bibliographies.

Part 1: Selecting a Topic related to “Future Forms of the Self” (worth 5 points)

Choose one of the following topics (below). You will be creating an annotated bibliography for this topic.



  • Effects of Multitasking : The Erosion of the Human Attention Span

  • Glass Cage : The Dangers of Too Much Automation

  • Robots – their Rights & Roles in our Future

  • Technological Singularity : When Artificial Intelligence Exceeds Human Intellectual Capacity; Can a machine be intelligent? Can it have a mind? Constitute a challenge to humanity?

  • Social Networking around the World

  • Books & Newspapers of the Future

  • Universal Identity System

  • The New Landscape of Global Healthcare

  • Space Tourism

Using a web search engine (such as Google), gain a basic understanding of your topic. All sources for your annotated bibliography must be current with a copyright from January 1st, 2012 or later. We will be using this assignment as a stepping stone to your final research paper (Essay #5 – 200 points) which will be due during final exam week.
Part 2: Locating Internet Resources (worth 10 points)

Using a web search engine (such as Google), locate reliable websites relevant to your selected topic. Select two websites that are most relevant to your topic. Examine these resources and create a citation and an annotation for each website.


Part 3: Locating Articles from Popular Magazines or Scholarly Journal Articles (worth 25 points)

Using appropriate search strategies, find four articles from popular magazines and/or scholarly journals relevant to your selected topic. Search strategies and subscription databases will be discussed in class and in our library visit. Some great websites with helpful search engines to articles on many of the topics are listed below.



  • wired.com

  • scientificamerican.com

  • roughtype.com

  • smithsonianmag.com

  • sciencedaily.com


Part 4: Locating Books (worth 20 points)

Locate books that would help you gather more information on your selected topic. Select two books that are most relevant to your topic. Examine these resources and create a citation and an annotation for each source. Note: You need not read an entire book. Find one or two chapters from the book related to your topic, and read those. Strategies for evaluating books will be discussed in class. Here are some outstanding, current books related to many of the topics that I highly recommend.



  • The Mobile Wave : How Mobile Intelligence Will Change Everything (2012) by Michael Saylor
  • Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other (2012) by Sherry Turkle

  • The Lost Art of Reading: Why Books Matter in a Distracted Time (2012) by David Ulin

  • Singularity Rising: Surviving and Thriving in a Smarter, Richer, and More Dangerous World (2012) by David Miller

  • Smarter Than You Think (2013) by Clive Thompson


  • The Glass Cage : Automation and Us (2014) by Nicholas Carr

  • We, Robots : Staying Human in the Age of Big Data (2015) by Curtis White



Part 5: The Complete Annotated Bibliography (worth 40 points)

Compile all eight sources into one cohesive document. Citations should be listed alphabetically by author’s name. Use 1 inch margins and Times New Roman (12 pt) font. Credit will not be given for descriptive information taken from another source. In other words, if you find a review and copy this review to serve as your annotation, you will not receive credit. This is plagiarism. Direct quotes may be included, but you should put them in quotes and cite appropriately. Your complete annotated bibliography should look like this:


Your Name

INT 101


November 28th, 2017

Your Topic

Annotated Bibliography

Annotation (annotation is single spaced)




  • Citation in MLA format

Annotation (annotation is single spaced)




  • Citation in MLA format

Annotation (annotation is single spaced)




  • Citation in MLA format

Annotation (annotation is single spaced)




  • Citation in MLA format

Annotation (annotation is single spaced)




  • Citation in MLA format

Annotation (annotation is single spaced)




  • Citation in MLA format

Annotation (annotation is single spaced)




  • Citation in MLA format


Annotation (annotation is single spaced)
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