Plymouth University Academic Partnerships cornwall college, Rosewarne Programme Quality Handbook



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Understanding the client (BACP)



The practitioner will have relevant knowledge to inform his or her ability to:
Devise a strategy for conducting assessment interviews with potential clients.

Devise and use a comprehensive risk assessment strategy.

Use all available information including pre-assessment information; client presentation; therapist response to the client and quantitative or qualitative measures or assessment tools to make a collaborative decision with clients regarding an appropriate therapeutic contract.

Reflect on, and synthesise complex and sometimes contradictory information in order to facilitate an understanding of underlying psychological difficulties.

Access and interpret research evidence and organisational guidance about appropriate and effective interventions for particular presentations of personal difficulties.

Demonstrate awareness of diversity and the rights and responsibilities of all clients, regardless of their gender, age, ethnicity, culture, class, ability, sexuality, religion and belief.

Openly and freely discuss sexual matters, when appropriate with a client, whatever the client’s sexual orientation or the nature of the client’s problem.

Make informed decisions about referral and the compatibility of counselling/psychotherapy and psychopharmacological interventions in conjunction with other professionals.

Recognise the signs and symptoms associated with mental distress and regularly update knowledge about mental health and wellbeing.

Identify ethical and legal responsibilities with regard to potential risk including critical decision making with respect to autonomy of the client and potential harm to self or others.

Recognise physical signs and symptoms that may accompany, mimic or be indicative of severe forms of psychological distress.

Understand the inter-relatedness of social and psychological factors.

Understand the inter-relatedness of psychological and physical illness and recognise that symptoms of physical illness may be indicative of the mental pain/distress/state of the client and vice versa.

Critically appraise conceptualisations of the nature of severe psychological distress.

Draw on empirical and theoretical sources to make an initial estimation of the number of sessions that may be most appropriate for clients with particular presenting difficulties.

Apply consistently a comprehensive, in-depth and research-informed body of knowledge in their practice.

Critically appraise theoretical frameworks which underpin therapeutic practice.


Lectures and tutorials
Directed independent study

Workshop


group tasks
Seminar
Use of Virtual

Learning Environ

(VLE)
Group tutorials

Reading – both

directed and

self-directed


Personal

self-directed study




Personal and professional Development
CORC 2217
Counselling psychology
CORC 2218

1, 3,6, 7

4, 5,7,8

Assessed seminar


Essay
























Counselling practice 1 and 2







An explanation for embedding Maintaining a framework for practice through Teaching & Learning and Assessment at this level of the programme:

The nature of the curriculum, the learning outcomes, content of the modules and the assessment process embed the

QAA Benchmark Statements for Counselling and Psychotherapy and the BACP core curriculum. .
These are:


  • Knowledge based learning

  • Therapeutic competencies

  • Development of self-awareness

  • Professional development

  • Skills work

  • Practice placements

The teaching, learning and assessment strategies are designed to enable achievement of intended learning outcomes

A range of approaches are therefore employed to ensure that:


  • Students with different learning styles experience a diversity of learning methods

  • Students experience learning methods appropriate to the learning outcomes

  • There is parity in the students’ experiences of learning methods

  • Students learn to maximise their own learning even when the method is not their favoured one.




The therapeutic process (QAA)

By the end of this level of this programme the students will be able to demonstrate for a threshold pass:

demonstrate familiarity with a model of assessment compatible with their core theoretical model in order to determine the client's therapeutic needs

assess the components which underpin therapeutic alliances, which may include client motivation, commitment to the therapeutic process and contractual arrangements

be able to communicate the scope and limits of confidentiality clearly and ethically to clients

set and maintain appropriate professional boundaries

establish and sustain a therapeutic alliance

understand and manage the impact of diversity and difference on the therapeutic relationship

use research literature on the impact of the therapeutic alliance to enhance relationships with clients

recognise ways in which the relationship is conceptualised in a range of different theoretical models

recognise and manage difficulties and ruptures in the therapeutic alliance

recognise and manage distortions in the client's perception of the therapist and of their experience of therapy

draw on a range of therapeutic responses, strategies and interventions to inform practice

manage problematic situations, including violation of the therapeutic contract

adapt responses and strategies to open-ended or time-limited contracts

apply appropriate strategies and interventions in work with specific client populations and client issues


      1. The therapeutic process (BACP)


The practitioner will have relevant knowledge to inform his or her ability to:

Establish and maintain an effective, collaborative therapeutic alliance with the client, with due regard to the physical, contractual and ethical framework.

Manage the beginning, middle and end of a therapeutic relationship according to their theoretical perspective of practice.

Develop and sustain a relationship with the client that offers sufficient safety and security, understanding and warmth to explore complex emotional concerns and clearly defines the boundaries of the relationship.

Clearly agree roles and responsibilities with the client whilst in a therapeutic relationship.

Negotiate and agree with clients’ appropriate and achievable therapeutic goals or outcomes and the process by which these can be achieved.

Demonstrate awareness of theoretical and research literature regarding the provision of a secure frame for therapy, including physical environment, contractual arrangements and ethics.

Apply and monitor a range of appropriate therapeutic interventions and strategies.

Acknowledge diversity relating to gender, age, ethnicity, culture, ability, religion, spirituality and sexuality as it impacts on the therapeutic relationship or the process of therapy.

Acknowledge changes that have occurred for the client during the course of therapy whether they be practical, behavioural, emotional or relational.

Acknowledge difficulties and ruptures encountered as part of the therapeutic process in order to find ways of making progress and re-establishing a positive therapeutic alliance.

Recognise and work with distortions in the client’s perception of the therapist or of their experience in therapy.

Support clients when in crisis by providing information about self-care strategies and making clear arrangements for future meetings or contact.

Anticipate the types of ‘out of session’ communication that clients might use, such as email, letters, text, telephone and visits, and determine an appropriate policy for managing and responding.

Recognise ways in which breaks and holidays may affect the therapeutic relationship or therapeutic process and make appropriate arrangements for clients to seek support in case of emergency.

Apply a theoretically and empirically informed body of knowledge consistently and effectively during the therapeutic process.

Clearly communicate imminent endings for the client and work to ensure these are managed safely and appropriately.

Negotiate an end date with the client allowing sufficient time to process the ending in accordance with a consistent, coherent and in-depth perspective.




Lectures and tutorials
Directed independent study
Learning from work experience
Enquiry based learning including problem based learning – for example ethical dilemmas

Workshop


group tasks
Seminar
Use of Virtual

Learning Environ

(VLE)
Group tutorials

Reading – both

directed and

self-directed


Personal

self-directed study


Case studies


Skills Practice
Self and peer assessment

Counselling Practice
CORC 2216
Counselling psychology
CORC 2218

1,2,6,7

1,2,3,7

DVD and critique

Essay



































An explanation for embedding The therapeutic process through Teaching & Learning and Assessment at this level of the programme

The nature of the curriculum, the learning outcomes, content of the modules and the assessment process embed the

QAA Benchmark Statements for Counselling and Psychotherapy and the BACP core curriculum. .
These are:


  • Knowledge based learning

  • Therapeutic competencies

  • Development of self-awareness

  • Professional development

  • Skills work

  • Practice placements

The teaching, learning and assessment strategies are designed to enable achievement of intended learning outcomes

A range of approaches are therefore employed to ensure that:


  • Students with different learning styles experience a diversity of learning methods

  • Students experience learning methods appropriate to the learning outcomes

  • There is parity in the students’ experiences of learning methods

  • Students learn to maximise their own learning even when the method is not their favoured one.




The social, professional and organisational context for therapy (QAA)

By the end of this level of this programme the students will be able to demonstrate for a threshold pass:

identify some of the philosophical assumptions underpinning the practice of counselling and psychotherapy

appraise the interrelatedness of truth claims, belief and ideology, and their influence on professional practice

interpret and apply relevant policies and codes of the employing organisation, including equal opportunities statements, disability statements and widening participation strategies

appraise the range of psychological services and interventions available to clients

recognise the potential importance of diversity in the therapeutic relationship

reflect on the role and function of counselling and psychotherapy in society

recognise ways in which government policies and recommendations such as those in the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (N.I.C.E.) guidelines may impact on mental health service provision and client well-being

recognise that power relationships and dynamics within groups and organisations have the potential to impact on therapy

critically appraise published research on counselling and psychotherapy and integrate relevant research findings into practice

implement methodologies to audit and evaluate the process and outcome of therapy

be familiar with the legal and ethical framework in which the therapy takes place

deliver the counselling/psychotherapy services with due regard to the practice setting.

.

      1. The social, professional and organisational context for therapy (BACP)


The practitioner will have relevant knowledge to inform his or her ability to:

Take an active role as a member of a professional community.

Show a critical awareness of the history of ideas, the cultural context and social and political theories that inform and influence the practice of counselling and psychotherapy.

Identify and critique the philosophical assumptions underpinning the practice of counselling and psychotherapy.

Understand the inter-relatedness of truth claims, belief and ideology and their influence on professional practice.

Interpret and apply relevant policies and codes of the employing organisation, including equal opportunities statements, disability statements and widening participation strategies.

Explore sensitively and respectfully with clients their culture and associated values recognising cultural differences, for example, in terms of predispositions to individualism and collectivism, emotional involvement and detachment.

Reflect on the role and function of counselling and psychotherapy in society and understand national politics in relation to mental health service provision and client wellbeing.

Demonstrate a clear commitment to best practice and work within an ethical framework for professional practice.

Demonstrate understanding of the relevant legislation that affects the practice of counselling and psychotherapy.

Make a contract with the appropriate organisation for the provision of therapy, including the extent of the provision with regard to time, place and resources.

Demonstrate an awareness of power relationships and dynamics within groups and organisations and their potential impact on therapy.

Work in multidisciplinary teams with other professionals and participate effectively to maximise therapeutic outcomes as appropriate.

Critically appraise published research on counselling and psychotherapy and integrate relevant research findings into practice.

Understand methodologies to evaluate the process and outcome of therapy.

Monitor and review the effectiveness of own practice.

Participate in therapeutic practice audit and other quality assurance procedures.


Lectures and tutorials
Directed independent study
Learning from work experience

Workshop


group tasks
Seminar
Use of Virtual

Learning Environ

(VLE)
Group tutorials

Reading – both

directed and

self-directed


Personal

self-directed study




Personal and Professional Development


CORC 2217

4,5,7

5,6,8

Assessed Seminar




























Counselling psychology 1 and 2


Personal and professional development 1 and 2
Counselling practice 1 and 2







The social, professional and organisational context for therapy

The nature of the curriculum, the learning outcomes, content of the modules and the assessment process embed the

QAA Benchmark Statements for Counselling and Psychotherapy and the BACP core curriculum. .
These are:


  • Knowledge based learning

  • Therapeutic competencies

  • Development of self-awareness

  • Professional development

  • Skills work

  • Practice placements

The teaching, learning and assessment strategies are designed to enable achievement of intended learning outcomes



A range of approaches are therefore employed to ensure that:


  • Students with different learning styles experience a diversity of learning methods

  • Students experience learning methods appropriate to the learning outcomes

  • There is parity in the students’ experiences of learning methods

  • Students learn to maximise their own learning even when the method is not their favoured one.







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