Plymouth University Academic Partnerships cornwall college, Camborne Programme Quality Handbook



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Appendix 1




      1. MODULEs


SECTION A: DEFINITIVE MODULE RECORD. Proposed changes must be submitted via Faculty Quality Procedures for approval and issue of new module code.


MODULE CODE:

CORA144

MODULE TITLE:

Applied Mathematics for Construction and the Built Environment




CREDITS: 20

FHEQ Level: 4

JACS CODE: G160










PRE-REQUISITES: None

CO-REQUISITES: None

COMPENSATABLE: Yes




SHORT MODULE DESCRIPTOR:

This module provides learners with an understanding of analytical techniques and the mathematical skills needed to solve construction and engineering problems.






ELEMENTS OF ASSESSMENT Use HESA KIS definitions]

WRITTEN EXAMINATION

COURSEWORK

PRACTICAL

E1 (Examination)

%

C1 (Coursework)

100%

P1 (Practical)

% or Pass/Fail (delete as appropriate)

E2 (Clinical Examination)

%

A1 (Generic Assessment)

%







T1 (Test)
















SUBJECT ASSESSMENT PANEL Group to which module should be linked: St Austell - Construction




Professional body minimum pass mark requirement: N/A




MODULE AIMS:

This module provides learners with an opportunity to develop skills in using analytical methods and statistics to solve construction and engineering problems






ASSESSED LEARNING OUTCOMES: (additional guidance below)

At the end of the module the learner will be expected to be able to:

Apply analytical methods to construction problems

Apply analytical methods to surveying and setting out procedures

Apply statistics to construction problems

Apply analytical methods to engineering problems.






DATE OF APPROVAL:

30 June 2016

FACULTY/OFFICE:

Academic Partnerships

DATE OF IMPLEMENTATION:

01 Sep 2016

SCHOOL/PARTNER:

Cornwall College

DATE(S) OF APPROVED CHANGE:

N/A

TERM/SEMESTER:

All Year




Additional notes (for office use only):



SECTION B: DETAILS OF TEACHING, LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT

Items in this section must be considered annually and amended as appropriate, in conjunction with the Module Review Process. Some parts of this page may be used in the KIS return and published on the extranet as a guide for prospective students. Further details for current students should be provided in module guidance notes.

ACADEMIC YEAR: 2016 – 2017

NATIONAL COST CENTRE: 115




MODULE LEADER: Mr Justin Olosunde

OTHER MODULE STAFF: None




SUMMARY of MODULE CONTENT

Analytical methods; Algebra; Graphical techniques; Laws of motion; Matrices; Application to construction problems; Trigonometry and trigonometrical techniques; Irregular areas and volumes; Applications to surveying and setting out procedures; Statistical methods; Table and graphs; Central tendency and dispersion; Distribution theory; Calculus.






SUMMARY OF TEACHING AND LEARNING [Use HESA KIS definitions]

Scheduled Activities

Hours

Comments/Additional Information

Lecture

50

Core Material

Tutorial

10

Additional one to one support

Guided Independent Study

140

Students are expected to put in additional time outside of taught sessions.

Total

200

(NB: 1 credit = 10 hours or learning; 10 credits = 100 hours, etc)




Category

Element

Component Name

Component Weighting

Comments include links to learning objectives

Written exam

E_




Total = 100%




T





Total = 100%




Coursework

C1

Coursework

100%

Total = 100%

Split into two sections of worked examples solving algebraic problem and trigonometric problems, followed by calculus and graphical problems

Practical

P_




%

Total = 100%







Updated by:

Justin Olosunde



Date:

30/06/16


Approved by:

HE Operations



Date:

30/06/16





Recommended Texts and Sources:

Bird, J. (2014). Engineering Mathematics. 7th. Ed. Abingdon: Routledge

Greer, A. and Taylor, G. (1989). Mathematics for technicians. Thornes.

Stroud, K. and Booth, D. (2007). Engineering mathematics. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Virdi, S., Baker, R. (2007). Construction Mathematics. Oxford: Butterworth-Heinemann




SECTION A: DEFINITIVE MODULE RECORD. Proposed changes must be submitted via Faculty Quality Procedures for approval and issue of new module code.


MODULE CODE:

CORA145

MODULE TITLE:

Design Principles and Application for Construction and the Built Environment




CREDITS: 20

FHEQ Level: 4

JACS CODE: K200










PRE-REQUISITES: None

CO-REQUISITES: None

COMPENSATABLE: Yes




SHORT MODULE DESCRIPTOR:

This module enables learners to gain an underpinning knowledge of design considerations and the design process. Learners will develop their ability to evaluate the planning and design phases and consider the environmental impact of construction projects. Learners will explore the roles and legal responsibilities of parties involved in construction projects. Learners will gain an understanding of how emerging technologies (BIM) affect the design and production phases of construction projects






ELEMENTS OF ASSESSMENT Use HESA KIS definitions]

WRITTEN EXAMINATION

COURSEWORK

PRACTICAL

E1 (Examination)

%

C1 (Coursework)

100%


P1 (Practical)

% or Pass/Fail (delete as appropriate)

E2 (Clinical Examination)

%

A1 (Generic Assessment)









T1 (Test)

















SUBJECT ASSESSMENT PANEL Group to which module should be linked: St Austell – Construction




Professional body minimum pass mark requirement: N/A




MODULE AIMS:

This module provides learners with an ability to understand the planning and design phases of the construction process and the factors that affect the specification of materials and building services







ASSESSED LEARNING OUTCOMES: (additional guidance below)

At the end of the module the learner will be expected to be able to:

Describe the planning and design phase of construction projects within the contextual requirement for BIM Level 2

Explain how the planning and design phases are coordinated and managed

Examine the factors that affect the specification of materials and building services

Explain the financial implications of specifying materials and building services






DATE OF APPROVAL:

30 June 2016

FACULTY/OFFICE:

Academic Partnerships

DATE OF IMPLEMENTATION:

01 Sept 2016

SCHOOL/PARTNER:

Cornwall College

DATE(S) OF APPROVED CHANGE:

N/A

TERM/SEMESTER:

All Year




Additional notes (for office use only):


SECTION B: DETAILS OF TEACHING, LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT

Items in this section must be considered annually and amended as appropriate, in conjunction with the Module Review Process. Some parts of this page may be used in the KIS return and published on the extranet as a guide for prospective students. Further details for current students should be provided in module guidance notes.

ACADEMIC YEAR: 2016 – 2017

NATIONAL COST CENTRE: 123




MODULE LEADER: Mr Carl Moyle

OTHER MODULE STAFF: None




SUMMARY of MODULE CONTENT

  • The planning and design phase factors: client requirements; constraints; financial implications

  • The contextual requirement for BIM Level 2 and its connection to the Government Construction Strategy and Industrial Strategy 2025

  • Specification of materials

  • Specification of building services

  • Environmental factors

  • Roles and responsibilities

  • Technologies




SUMMARY OF TEACHING AND LEARNING [Use HESA KIS definitions]

Scheduled Activities

Hours

Comments/Additional Information

Lecture

50

Core material delivery. These assignments will require practical work. The college will support practical work opportunities and arranged facilities for practical work with the learner.

Tutorial

10

The final assessment for each module will include an interview with the individual learner and Personal Tutor.

Guided Independent Study

140

Students are expected to carry out research and development activities outside taught sessions

Total

200

(NB: 1 credit = 10 hours or learning; 10 credits = 100 hours, etc)




Category

Element

Component Name

Component Weighting

Comments include links to learning objectives

Written exam

E_




Total = 100%




T_




Total = 100%




Coursework

C1

Assignments/ Reports

100%

Total = 100%

Integrated assignments (maximum 2) within a student project work will help to link this to other modules.

Practical

P_




%

Total = 100%







Updated by:

Justin Olosunde



Date:

30/06/16


Approved by:

HE Operations



Date:

30/06/16





Recommended Texts and Sources:

R.J.W. Milne (1997) Structural Engineering:

Chudley, R., 2008. Construction Technology. 4th Edition. Prentice Hall

Chudley, R., 2008. Building Construction Handbook. 7th Edition. Oxford. Butterworth-Heineman

Ashworth, A . Pre-Contract Studies: Development Economics, Estimating and Tendering (Longman, 1996)

Everett, A . Materials 5th Edition . (Longman, 1994)

McMullan, R . Environmental Science in Building 5th Edition . (Palgrave, 2001)

Other publications

BRE Digests

Guidance notes on Town and Country Planning Act, Health and Safety at Work Act, CDM Regulations, and other relevant legislation

Papers from ABE, ASHRAE, BRE, CIBSE, CIOB, ICE, RICS, BCIS, VALUER

Papers from BIAT, RIBA and RTPI

Papers from Cement and Concrete Association

Papers from TRADA Architects Journal

Web Based Resources

http://www.bimtaskgroup.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/BIS-BIM-strategy-Report.pdf

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/61152/Government-Construction-Strategy_0.pdf

https://www.thenbs.com/knowledge/nbs-national-bim-report-2014


SECTION A: DEFINITIVE MODULE RECORD. Proposed changes must be submitted via Faculty Quality Procedures for approval and issue of new module code.


MODULE CODE:

CORA146

MODULE TITLE:

Science and Materials for Construction and the Built Environment




CREDITS: 20

FHEQ Level: 4

JACS CODE: K200










PRE-REQUISITES: None

CO-REQUISITES: None

COMPENSATABLE: Yes




SHORT MODULE DESCRIPTOR:

This module introduces scientific principles relevant to the study of construction and civil engineering and provides students with a fundamental understanding of the properties and use of construction materials. It has been designed to enable students to explore scientific principles and the behaviour of materials used in the civil engineering and built environment sector.






ELEMENTS OF ASSESSMENT Use HESA KIS definitions]

WRITTEN EXAMINATION

COURSEWORK

PRACTICAL

E1 (Examination)

%

C1 (Coursework)

50%

P1 (Practical)

50%

E2 (Clinical Examination)

%

A1 (Generic Assessment)

%







T1 (Test)

















SUBJECT ASSESSMENT PANEL Group to which module should be linked: St Austell – Construction




Professional body minimum pass mark requirement: N/A




MODULE AIMS:

This module aims to provide students with an understanding of the properties, structural behaviour and use of construction materials, and develops the skills needed to use scientific principles to solve construction problems.







ASSESSED LEARNING OUTCOMES: (additional guidance below)

At the end of the module the learner will be expected to be able to:



  1. Describe the properties and use of construction materials whilst explaining the structural behaviour of construction materials

  2. Apply scientific principles to the design and use of buildings

  3. Solve scientific problems in construction and civil engineering







DATE OF APPROVAL:




FACULTY/OFFICE:

Academic Partnerships

DATE OF IMPLEMENTATION:




SCHOOL/PARTNER:

Cornwall College

DATE(S) OF APPROVED CHANGE:




TERM/SEMESTER:

All Year




Additional notes (for office use only):


SECTION B: DETAILS OF TEACHING, LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT

Items in this section must be considered annually and amended as appropriate, in conjunction with the Module Review Process. Some parts of this page may be used in the KIS return and published on the extranet as a guide for prospective students. Further details for current students should be provided in module guidance notes.

ACADEMIC YEAR: 2016 - 2017

NATIONAL COST CENTRE: 123




MODULE LEADER: Mr John Betts

OTHER MODULE STAFF: None




SUMMARY of MODULE CONTENT

• Properties and use of construction materials

• Structural behaviour of construction materials

• Design and use of buildings

• Factors affecting human comfort

• Building services

• Thermal performance levels

• Scientific problems






SUMMARY OF TEACHING AND LEARNING [Use HESA KIS definitions]

Scheduled Activities

Hours

Comments/Additional Information

Lecture

40

Core material delivery.

Tutorial

20

Workshop and laboratory work

Guided Independent Study

140

Students are expected to carry out research and development activities outside taught sessions

Total

200

(NB: 1 credit = 10 hours or learning; 10 credits = 100 hours, etc)




Category

Element

Component Name

Component Weighting

Comments include links to learning objectives

Written exam

E_




Total = 100%




T_




Total = 100%




Coursework

C1

Assignments/ Reports

100%

Total = 100%

Assignment on properties and use of construction materials and their impact on building performance

Practical

P1

Lab Practical

Graded

Total = 100%

Laboratory assessment




Updated by:

Justin Olosunde



Date:

30/06/16


Approved by:

HE Operations



Date:

30/06/16





Recommended Texts and Sources:

Waters, J. R. (2003). Energy Conservation in Buildings: A Guide to Part L of the Building Regulations: Blackwell Publishing.



Recommended Texts and Sources:

Ahmed, A. and Sturges, J. (2015). Materials science in construction. Abingdon: Routledge.

Anderson, J., Shiers, D. and Steele, K. (2009). The green guide to specification. Bracknell [England]: IHS BRE Press.

Ashby, M. and Jones, D. (2012). Engineering materials 1. Oxford: Butterworth-Heinemann.

Calkins, M. (2009). Materials for sustainable sites. Hoboken, N.J.: Wiley.

Domone, P. and Illston, J. (2010). Construction Materials Their Nature and Behaviour. 4th ed. London: Spon Press.

Goodhew, S. (n.d.). Sustainable construction processes. Taylor, G. (2014). Materials in construction. 3rd ed. Harlow: Routledge.

Nicholls, R. and Hall, K. (2008). The green building bible volume 1. Llandysul (Royaume-Uni): Green Building Press.

Nicholls, R. and Hall, K. (2008). The green building bible volume 2. Llandysul (Royaume-Uni): Green Building Press.

McMullan, R. (2012). Environmental science in building. 7th ed. Basingstoke, England: Macmillan.




SECTION A: DEFINITIVE MODULE RECORD. Proposed changes must be submitted via Faculty Quality Procedures for approval and issue of new module code.


MODULE CODE:

CORA147

MODULE TITLE:

Health, Safety & Welfare for Construction and the Built Environment




CREDITS: 20

FHEQ Level: 4

JACS CODE: H123










PRE-REQUISITES: None

CO-REQUISITES: None

COMPENSATABLE: Y




SHORT MODULE DESCRIPTOR:

This module covers current health, safety and welfare legislation applicable to the construction and civil engineering sectors including the main requirements of an effective health and safety policy and its successful implementation in the workplace. Students will gain an understanding of how to identify and record hazards, assess risks and select appropriate control measures to prevent or mitigate ill health and injuries on site.






ELEMENTS OF ASSESSMENT Use HESA KIS definitions]

WRITTEN EXAMINATION

COURSEWORK

PRACTICAL

E1 (Examination)

%

C1 (Coursework)

50%

P1 (Practical)

% or Pass/Fail (delete as appropriate)

E2 (Clinical Examination)

%

A1 (Generic Assessment)

%







T1 (Test)

50%















SUBJECT ASSESSMENT PANEL Group to which module should be linked: St Austell – Construction




Professional body minimum pass mark requirement: N/A




MODULE AIMS:

To enable students to develop an understanding of health, safety and welfare legislation and effective health and safety policies.

To develop the skills needed to undertake risk assessments





ASSESSED LEARNING OUTCOMES: (additional guidance below)

At the end of the module the learner will be expected to be able to:



  1. Describe the health, safety and welfare legislation applicable to the construction and civil engineering sectors

  2. Explain the main requirements of an effective health and safety policy

  3. Illustrate the hazards and the risk identification in design and construction, highlighting the need to review, revise and monitor risk assessments, including the production of relevant risk assessments




DATE OF APPROVAL:

30 June 2016

FACULTY/OFFICE:

Academic Partnerships

DATE OF IMPLEMENTATION:

01 Sept 2016

SCHOOL/PARTNER:

Cornwall College

DATE(S) OF APPROVED CHANGE:

N/A

TERM/SEMESTER:

All Year




Additional notes (for office use only):


SECTION B: DETAILS OF TEACHING, LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT

Items in this section must be considered annually and amended as appropriate, in conjunction with the Module Review Process. Some parts of this page may be used in the KIS return and published on the extranet as a guide for prospective students. Further details for current students should be provided in module guidance notes.

ACADEMIC YEAR: 2016-2017

NATIONAL COST CENTRE: 118




MODULE LEADER: Andrew Price

OTHER MODULE STAFF: None




SUMMARY of MODULE CONTENT

Current relevant legislation and codes of practice; Implications of legislation; Health and safety policy statement; Health and safety organisation and arrangements; Hazard identification; Hazard ratings; Recording of hazards and risks; Chronic occupational health risks; Reasons to review, revise and monitor risk assessments; Recording and implementation of reviews, revisions and monitoring; Types of risk assessment; Assessment of specific risks; Undertaking of risk assessment; Reviewing preventative and protective measures






SUMMARY OF TEACHING AND LEARNING [Use HESA KIS definitions]

Scheduled Activities

Hours

Comments/Additional Information

Lecture

60

Core developmental work

Guided independent Study

140

Students are expected to carry out research and development activities outside taught sessions. These assignments will require practical work in the form of the production of risk assessments

Total

200

(NB: 1 credit = 10 hours or learning; 10 credits = 100 hours, etc)




Category

Element

Component Name

Component Weighting

Comments include links to learning objectives

Written exam

E_




%

Total = 100%




T1

In class tests

100%

Total = 100%

Understanding the various Health, Safety and welfare legislation; Hazard identification


Coursework

C1

Assignments

100%

Total = 100%

Method statements and risk assessment for differing scenarios

Practical

P_




%

Total = 100%







Updated by:

Justin Olosunde



Date:

30/06/16


Approved by:

HE Operations



Date:

30/06/16





Recommended Texts and Sources:

BRE Digests

Guidance notes on Town and Country Planning Act, Health and Safety at Work Act, CDM Regulations, and other relevant legislation

Health and Safety Commission. A Guide to the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974

Health and Safety Commission. Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1992

Health and Safety Commission. Successful Health and Safety Management





SECTION A: DEFINITIVE MODULE RECORD. Proposed changes must be submitted via Faculty Quality Procedures for approval and issue of new module code.


MODULE CODE:

CORA148

MODULE TITLE:

An Applied Introduction to Site Surveying Procedures for Construction and the Built Environment




CREDITS: 20

FHEQ Level: 4

JACS CODE: H242










PRE-REQUISITES: None

CO-REQUISITES: None

COMPENSATABLE: Y




SHORT MODULE DESCRIPTOR:

This module develops an understanding of the principles of site surveying and cartographic detailing of construction works and the skills to use site surveying instruments, alongside an understanding of the software available.






ELEMENTS OF ASSESSMENT Use HESA KIS definitions]

WRITTEN EXAMINATION

COURSEWORK

PRACTICAL

E1 (Examination)

%

C1 (Coursework)

50%


P1 (Practical)

50%

E2 (Clinical Examination)

%

A1 (Generic Assessment)

%







T1 (Test)

%















SUBJECT ASSESSMENT PANEL Group to which module should be linked: St Austell – Construction




Professional body minimum pass mark requirement: Not Applicable




MODULE AIMS:

To develop an understanding of the principles of site surveying and cartographic detailing of construction works and the skills to use site surveying instruments, alongside an understanding of the software available.






ASSESSED LEARNING OUTCOMES: (additional guidance below)

At the end of the module the learner will be expected to be able to:



  1. Understand the principles of site surveying

  2. Be able to use site surveying instruments

  3. Understand cartographic detailing of construction works

  4. Understand the software available for site surveying







DATE OF APPROVAL:

30 June 2016

FACULTY/OFFICE:

Academic Partnerships

DATE OF IMPLEMENTATION:

01 Sept 2016

SCHOOL/PARTNER:

Cornwall College

DATE(S) OF APPROVED CHANGE:

N/A

TERM/SEMESTER:

All Year




Additional notes (for office use only):


SECTION B: DETAILS OF TEACHING, LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT

Items in this section must be considered annually and amended as appropriate, in conjunction with the Module Review Process. Some parts of this page may be used in the KIS return and published on the extranet as a guide for prospective students. Further details for current students should be provided in module guidance notes.

ACADEMIC YEAR: 2016-2017

NATIONAL COST CENTRE: 123




MODULE LEADER: Mr John Betts

OTHER MODULE STAFF: None




SUMMARY of MODULE CONTENT

  • Principles of site surveying – Linear measurement; levelling; angular; distinction between open, link and closed traverse; setting out

  • Introduction to site surveying instruments – Appropriate instruments; Levels; Electronic and laser instruments

  • Cartographic detailing – Raw data and translation for cartographic detail/setting out; Angular measurement; Setting out

  • Introduction to surveying computer software




SUMMARY OF TEACHING AND LEARNING [Use HESA KIS definitions]

Scheduled Activities

Hours

Comments/Additional Information

Demonstration

10

Use of core equipment

Fieldwork

20

The college will support practical work opportunities and arrange facilities for practical work with the learner. The college has industry recognised surveying equipment which will be used with the learners to demonstrate surveying knowledge, skill and competence in application.

Lectures

30

Introduction to the CAD suite

Guided independent Study

140

Students are expected to carry out research and development activities outside taught sessions.

Total

200

(NB: 1 credit = 10 hours or learning; 10 credits = 100 hours, etc)




Category

Element

Component Name

Component Weighting

Comments include links to learning objectives

Coursework

C1

Assignment / Report

100%

Total = 100%

Using given examples produce and interpret technical information to an industry level

In a report critically evaluate the process of a building survey



Practical

P1

Site work

Graded

Total = 100%

Demonstrate a clear understanding of surveying methods and calculations. Using a basic given example, demonstrate surveying practice




Updated by:

Justin Olosunde



Date:

30/06/16


Approved by:

HE Operations



Date:

30/06/16





Recommended Texts and Sources:
Brighty, S. and  Stirling, D., (1988), Setting Out. 2nd ed.  Oxford: Blackwell Science.

Galliford & Sons Ltd., (1976), The CIRIA Manual of Setting Out Procedures, London: Pitman.

Clancy, J., (1991), Site Surveying and Levelling. 2nd ed. London: Edward Arnold.

Irvine, W., (2006), Surveying for Construction. 5th ed. London: McGraw-Hill.

Muskett, J., (1995), Site Surveying. 2nd ed.  Oxford: Blackwell.

Thompson, A., (1993), An Introduction to Construction Drawing.  London: Edward Arnold.


PERIODICALS

Architects’ Journal

Surveyor
ELECTRONIC RESOURCES
http:www.ajplus.co.uk Architects’ Journal on-line

Chudley and Greeno Building Construction Handbook




SECTION A: DEFINITIVE MODULE RECORD. Proposed changes must be submitted via Faculty Quality Procedures for approval and issue of new module code.


MODULE CODE:

CORA150

MODULE TITLE:

Introduction to Project Planning and Development for Construction and the Built Environment




CREDITS: 20

FHEQ Level: 4

JACS CODE: K220










PRE-REQUISITES: None

CO-REQUISITES: None

COMPENSATABLE: Y




SHORT MODULE DESCRIPTOR:

This module introduces learners to the principles and application of management as they relate to the technical and professional disciplines of construction. It is based on the principles of the Latham Report of 1994, which advocated non-adversarial, multi-disciplinary team-working. The module contextualizes the principles and application of management with respect to a learners own personal and professional practice within a group project scenario setting.






ELEMENTS OF ASSESSMENT Use HESA KIS definitions]

WRITTEN EXAMINATION

COURSEWORK

PRACTICAL

E1 (Examination)

%

C1 (Coursework)

50%


P1 (Practical)


50%

E2 (Clinical Examination)

%

A1 (Generic Assessment)

%







T1 (Test)

%















SUBJECT ASSESSMENT PANEL Group to which module should be linked: St Austell – Construction




Professional body minimum pass mark requirement: Not Applicable




MODULE AIMS:

To provide students with an understanding of management principles and their practical application to the construction and built environment sector.






ASSESSED LEARNING OUTCOMES: (additional guidance below)

At the end of the module the learner will be expected to be able to:



  1. Identify and explain the evolution of management principles and scope their application in a group project scenario and implement in a scheme of work

  2. Apply understanding of concepts relating to personal employability skills and work related skills and reflect upon how these relate to personal and professional practice within the group project setting

  3. Evaluate and present a group project on an agreed project scenario







DATE OF APPROVAL:

30 June 2016

FACULTY/OFFICE:

Academic Partnerships

DATE OF IMPLEMENTATION:

01 Sept 2016

SCHOOL/PARTNER:

Cornwall College

DATE(S) OF APPROVED CHANGE:

N/A

TERM/SEMESTER:

All Year




Additional notes (for office use only):


SECTION B: DETAILS OF TEACHING, LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT

Items in this section must be considered annually and amended as appropriate, in conjunction with the Module Review Process. Some parts of this page may be used in the KIS return and published on the extranet as a guide for prospective students. Further details for current students should be provided in module guidance notes.

ACADEMIC YEAR: 2016-2017

NATIONAL COST CENTRE: 123




MODULE LEADER: John Betts

OTHER MODULE STAFF: None




SUMMARY of MODULE CONTENT

Principles of management; Human resources management; Structure and activities; Organisational structures and approaches; Influence of size and scale of contracts; Planning ( Project scoping); Procurement scheduling and control; Quality control; Risk management; Procurement methods; Contracts; Practice of procurement






SUMMARY OF TEACHING AND LEARNING [Use HESA KIS definitions]

Scheduled Activities

Hours

Comments/Additional Information

Lectures

40

Core delivery

Tutorial

20

Professional discussion and role play activities to review the role of management in project planning and development

Guided independent Study

140

Students are expected to carry out research and development activities outside taught sessions to enable them to present their findings for academic and peer review.










Total

200

(NB: 1 credit = 10 hours or learning; 10 credits = 100 hours, etc)




Category

Element

Component Name

Component Weighting

Comments include links to learning objectives

Written exam

E_




%

Total = 100%




T_




Total = 100%




Coursework

C1

Assignment

100%


Total = 100%

Management principles and application - Performance within this module will be assessed throughout the programme, through a combination of coursework (project scoping) and group work culminating in an assessed group presentation.

Practical

P1




Graded

Total = 100%

Assessed Group presentation to peers




Updated by:

Justin Olosunde



Date:

30/06/16


Approved by:

HE Operations



Date:

30/06/16





Recommended Texts and Sources:
Keoki Sears, S., Sears, G. A., and Clough, R., (2008) Construction Project Management, Wiley Blackwell.

Dallas, M., (2006) Value & Risk Management. Wiley Blackwell

R Mo ledge, R., Smith, A. and Kashiwag, D. T., (2006) Building Procurement. Wiley Blackwell

Smith, N., Jobling, P. and Merna, T., (2006) Managing Risk in Construction. Wiley Blackwell

Fryer, B. and Ellis, R., (2004) The Practice of Construction Management. Wiley Blackwell

Lock, D., (2004) Project Management in Construction. Gower.

Ashworth, A. Pre-Contract Studies: Development Economics, Estimating and Tendering. (Longman, 1996)

Cooke, B and Williams, P. Construction Planning, Programming and Control. (Macmillan, 1997)

Fryer, B. The Practice of Construction Management. (Blackwell, 1997)

Harvey, R and Ashworth, A. The Construction Industry of Great Britain. (Oxford, 1997)

Oxley, R and Poskitt, J. Management Techniques Applied to the Construction Industry. (Blackwell Science, 1996)
Other publications

Egan, J. Rethinking Construction-A Consultation paper by the Strategic Forum for Construction. (DETR, 2002)

Egan, J. Rethinking Construction. (DETR, 1998)

Joint Contracts Tribunal.

Joint Contracts Tribunal Forms of Contract

Latham, M. Constructing the Team. (The Stationary Office Books, 1994)



Appendix 2

CONSTRUCTION TECHNICIAN Trailblazer Apprenticeship Standard

July 2014



1. Occupation(s)

The occupations covered by this standard are associated with the control of construction projects. They are based on sites or in offices and have the following options (professional body in brackets):

Construction Site Supervisor (Chartered Institute of Building): supervise specialist contractors working on a construction site.

Construction Site Engineer (Institution of Civil Engineers): control dimensions of construction activities and assist in engineering solutions

Quantity Surveying Technician (Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors): assist with financial control of spending on a construction project

Building Services Site Technician (Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers): supervise the installation of mechanical and electrical services in a construction project

Construction Design Co-ordinator (Chartered Institute of Architectural Technicians): assist with control of design information and electronic data on a construction project

2. Occupational profile

The main duties and tasks of a Construction Technician are:

To assist with implementing safe systems of work and supervising operatives on their site

To monitor progress so that the project is completed on time

To inspect and record end products to contribute to the quality demanded by the client

To measure and cost construction activity against financial plans

To measure and record environmental impact of construction projects

To assist in communicating progress and activities



Each optional occupation will have duties associated with their professional body requirements.

3. Requirements: Knowledge, Skills (and behaviours) Knowledge

What is required

Health and Safety

Understand risk assessment of activities and the importance of behaviours in safety-critical environments

Sustainability

Understand the sustainability issues in projects across economic, social and environmental aspects

Construction Management

Understand management principles and the project management lifecycle

Construction Technology

Understand different construction techniques and materials

Planning and Organising Work

Understand the importance of project planning and resourcing and be able to analyse different techniques

Monitor Quality

Define the level of quality required on finished construction project.

Monitor financial and legal issues

Understand financial and legal constraints for all stakeholders in construction projects

Skills

What is required

Health and Safety

Identify risk of activities and encourage all employees to demonstrate safety-conscious behaviours

Sustainability

Assess, identify and record the environmental impact of projects

Construction Management

Use effective management principles and be able to supervise construction workers

Construction Technology

Assist in the implementation of the most appropriate solutions for construction projects

Planning and Organising Work

Understand overall plan for project and measure and record progress against plan.

Monitor Quality

Assess and report on quality standards of finished construction projects

Monitor financial and legal issues

Understand financial and legal constraints and measure and record progress against budget.

© Crown copyright 2014 You may re-use this information (not including logos) free of charge in any format or medium, under the terms of the Open Government Licence. Visit www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/doc/open-government-licence

1 This Programme Specification contains no information pertaining and/or referring to any individual and is therefore appropriate for dissemination as a public document.

2QAA, 2011, Chapter A3: The Programme Level, UK Quality Code for Higher Education: http://www.qaa.ac.uk/en/Publications/Documents/quality-code-A3.pdf , last accessed 28th July 2014 [n.b. this includes ‘Appendix 2: Working with programme specifications: A leaflet for further education colleges’]

3 If required please contact Academic Partnerships Programme Administration for assistance.

4 Accredited Prior Experiential Learning and Accredited Prior Certificated Learning

5.

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