Plymouth University Academic Partnerships cornwall college, Camborne Programme Quality Handbook



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Referencing Guides


https://intranet.cornwall.ac.uk/intranet/learning-services/documents/Harvard_Referencing_July13.pdf
    1. Programme Structure and Delivery


Part-time HNC

Year 1


Year 1

Module Code

Module Title

No. of Credits

Core / Optional

Term/

Semester

CORA 144

Applied Mathematics for Construction and the Built Environment

20

Core

1 & 2

CORA 146

Science & Materials for Construction and the Built Environment

20

Core

1 & 2

CORA 145

Design Principles and Application for Construction and the Built Environment

20

Core

2 & 3

Year 2

Year 2

Module Code

Module Title

No. of Credits

Core / Optional

Term/

Semester

CORA 147

Health, Safety & Welfare for Construction & the Built Environment

20

Core

1 & 2

CORA 148

An applied introduction to Site Surveying Procedures for Construction & the Built environment

20

Core

1 & 2

CORA 150

Introduction to Project Planning & Development for Construction & the Built Environment

20

Core

2 & 3


    1. Course resources



Learning Centre

CAD Suite

Basic and advanced site surveying equipment

Material Science Laboratory

Specialist software systems


  1. Assessment Schedules and Feedback


Each Programme has a designated Moodle page which houses further details of each of the modules contained with a programme. A full assessment schedule will be available via Moodle. Any changes made to the schedule will be done in consultation with the student body and will be fully communicated to the students that are affected.

The following calendar outlines your assessment schedule for the year. You should adhere to the assignments on this schedule as the definitive assignments hand-in dates for your programme. If you cannot make the deadline dates there is an extenuating circumstances process and details of this can be discussed with your personal tutor.

FdSc (HNC) Construction & Built Environment Assessment Schedule

Module


Code


Module Title



Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

CORA 144

Applied Mathematics for Construction and the Built Environment




C1




C2

C3
















CORA 146

Science & Materials for Construction and the Built Environment










C1




P1













CORA 145

Design Principles and Application for Construction and the Built Environment






















C1




C2

CORA 147

Health, Safety & Welfare for Construction & the Built Environment




T1




C1



















CORA 148

An applied introduction to Site Surveying Procedures for Construction & the Built environment













C1




P1










CORA 150

Introduction to Project Planning & Development for Construction & the Built Environment






















C1




P1

Key: C# - coursework assessment (report, essay, practical (P#), in class test (T#) etc.)

E# - examination






Examination

Coursework

Practical

MODULE CODE

Examination

Test

Coursework Type

Coursework Type

Practical Type

Practical Type

Year 1- Stage 1

CORA144 Applied mathematics for Construction and the Built Environment







Coursework 100%










CORA146 Science and Materials for Construction and the Built Environment







Assignments/Reports 100%










CORA145 Design Principles and Application for Construction and the Built Environment







Assignments/Reports 50%




Lab Practical 50%




Year 2 – Stage 1

CORA147 Health, Safety and Welfare for Construction and the Built Environment




In Class Test 50%

Assignments 50%










CORA148 An Applied introduction to Site Surveying Procedures for Construction and the Built Environment







Assignments/Reports 50%




Site work 50%




CORA150 Introduction to Project Planning and Development for Construction and the Built Environment







Assignments 50%




Assessed Group Presentation 50%






Marking stage





Student submits work / sits test / sits examination




Work collated & passed to

Module Leader

Work is marked by Module Leader

Marks collated by Module Leader & submitted to Programme Manager



Internal moderation stage





Students receive initial UNCONFIRMED mark




Internal moderation sample selected1.

Moderation by second academic

Unconfirmed mark & feedback back to students within 20 working days

Marks collated by Module Leader & submitted to Programme Manager



External moderation stage








External moderation samples selected and moderated by External Examiners

Marks collated by Module Leader & submitted to Programme Manager



Subject Assessment Panel (SAP) (ratification) stage





CONFIRMED marks issued to students




Marks approved by SAP and forwarded to College Award Assessment Board


Marks submitted to SAP for consideration and approval

Marks collated by Module Leader & submitted to Programme Manager



1The sample for the internal moderation comprises 20% or 10 assessment pieces minimum. The sample should include a range of assessment pieces including borderlines and fails. For more guidance see the Plymouth University Marking and Moderation policy 2015
      1. Assignment Feedback form




Lecturer




Module




Student Name






General Comments




Strength of Assignment




Areas of Improvement






Second Marking:

Grade: %

Comments:

Grade agreed
%

Change recommended



%



      1. Harvard Reference guide


Indirect Referencing

As the verb in the main clause, followed by a ‘that’ clause

Rees (2004) argues that …

Rees (2004) observes that …
as the verb in a ‘comment’ clause, followed by the main clause:

As Rees (2004) argues, …

As Rees (2004) observes, …
as a noun in the main clause

Rees (2004) uses the argument that …

Rees (2004) makes the observation that …


Direct Referencing

For quotation only

In the words of Rees (2004:6), ‘…’.
To quote Rees (2004:6), ‘…’.
With regard to … , Rees (2004:6) has the following to say: ‘…’.
If the suggestion that ‘…’ (Rees, 2004:6), then a question must be asked about…
As noted by Weare (2005:3), 'the phenomenon observed is dramatic', which suggests that…


More Than Two Authors

On the first occurrence all authors should be listed. After that…
If there are more than two authors, the surname of the first author only should be given, followed by ‘et al.’ (Latin for 'and others', preferably in italics and followed by a full stop as it is an abbreviation), for example:
Chavez et al. (1997) conclude that the solution lies in improved education to promote sustainability literacy...


Secondary Sources

For a secondary source (i.e. if you refer to a source quoted in another work) ideally you should aim to trace the original source. If you are unable to check it, you need to cite both in the text, for example:



A study by French (1984, cited in Saunders, 1995:24) showed that...
(Note that you need to list the work you have used, i.e. Saunders, in the list of references section at the end of the essay and in the bibliography)


Repitition of Findings

If a number of different authors are essentially saying the same thing or agree on a particular issue, you can include all the different authors in one reference for example:
Many studies suggest (Smith and Stafford, 2006; Hassan, 2005; George, 1999; Bertelli, 1997) that...


Reference List (Books)

If you are referring to a book, you should give the following information:
Surname, Initials. (year of publication). Title. Edition (if not the first). Place of publication: Name of publisher.
Soper, K. (1995). What is nature? Culture, politics and the non-human (2nd edn). Oxford: Blackwell.

Reference List (Articles)

If you are referring to an article, you should give the following information:
Surname, Initials. (year). 'Title of article', Name of Journal (with capitals as they appear in the journal), volume number (part number), pages.


Reference List (Websites)

What you need in order to use a website:
Author of the information (a person, group or organisation), if there is one

Year (most web pages have a date at the bottom of the page)

Title

URL (i.e. whole web address including numbers, slashes etc.)

The date you accessed the web page.
Hayes, M. J. (2001). Intellectual property rights. Available at: www.jisclegal.ac.uk/ipr/IntellectualProperty.htm (Accessed: 8 June 2004).

      1. Assessment Criteria


Essays Should:

70-100%

60-69%

50-59%

40-49%

30-39%

Use a wide range of material, the relevance of which is immediately apparent;

Include a fairly wide range of material, which is relevant to the specified topic area;

Include a range of material which is predominantly relevant to the specified topic area;

Include a range of material which has some relevance to the specified topic area;

Have little or no material relevant to the specified topic area;

Demonstrate an excellent understanding of the topic area;

Demonstrate a good understanding of that area;

Demonstrate a reasonable understanding of that area;

Demonstrate some understanding of that area;

Demonstrate a limited understanding of the area;

Present a clear and consistent argument, producing policy-based and/or theoretical recommendations where appropriate;

Present a coherent argument, with evidence of policy-based and/or theoretical recommendations where appropriate;

Present an identifiable argument, with some evidence of policy-based and/or theoretical recommendations where appropriate;

Present an identifiable argument, but may provide no evidence of policy-based and/or theoretical recommendations where that is appropriate;

Present no discernible argument;

Have an excellent structure, with a directive introduction and a clear conclusion, which have provided a vehicle for the central argument presented;

Have a very good structure, which might have an introduction or a conclusion that is not entirely definitive, but notwithstanding will provide a reliable vehicle for the central argument presented;

Have a good structure which might have a non-directive introduction or fairly weak conclusion, providing something of a framework for the central argument presented;

Have a recognisable structure, though the introduction and the conclusion may be weak, but which nevertheless provides a framework, albeit shaky, for the central argument presented;

Have a weak, almost non-existent structure

Have no significant stylistic shortcomings, in relations to spelling, grammar etc.

Have a few stylistic problems in relation to spelling, grammar etc.

No major stylistic problems in relation to spelling, grammar etc.

Has stylistic problems, in terms of spelling, grammar etc, but not to the extent that they serve to obscure the argument presented

Have major stylistic problems which impact upon the argument and focus of the essay

Conform to the bibliographic and referencing standards specified.

Conform to the bibliographic and referencing standards specified.

Mainly conform to the bibliographic and referencing standards specified.

Meets to some extent the bibliographic and referencing standards specified.

Fail to conform to the bibliographic and referencing standards specified

Presentations should:

70-100%

60-69%

50-59%

40-49%

30-39%

Demonstrate excellent and extensive knowledge of the specific area;

Demonstrate an extensive knowledge of the specific area

Demonstrate sufficient knowledge of the specified area

Demonstrate limited knowledge of the specified area

Demonstrate little or no knowledge of the specified area

Provide evidence of a highly developed presentation plan

Provide evidence of a well-developed presentation plan

Provide evidence of a presentation plan

Provide limited evidence of a presentation plan

Provide no evidence of a presentation plan

Be coherent and have excellent structure and, where relevant show strong evidence of co-operation

Be coherent and have a good structure and, where relevant, show evidence of co-operation

Be mostly coherent and have a reasonable structure and, where relevant, show some evidence of co-operation

Demonstrate limited levels of coherency and structure and, where relevant, show limited evidence of co-operation

Be largely incoherent and have a weak or non-existent structure and, where relevant, have no evidence of co-operation

Altogether effective in avoiding simply reading from notes and in encouraging wider group participation

Be effective, though presenters may read from notes and show evidence of encouraging wider group participation

Be adequately effective, though the presenters may directly read from notes and make little effort to encourage wider group participation

The presenters directly read from notes and make little to no effort to encourage wider group participation

Be ineffective, read entirely from notes and show no evidence of efforts to encourage wider group participation

Make excellent use of presentation aids

Make good use of presentation aids

Make use of presentation aids

Make limited of presentation aids

Make no use of presentation aids of any kind

Descriptor for a Higher Education Qualification at Level 4

The descriptor provided for this level is for any Certificate of Higher Education which should meet the descriptor in full. This qualification descriptor can also be used as a reference point for other level 4 qualifications (adapted from the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications).
Level 4 is achieved by students who have demonstrated:

  • Knowledge of the underlying concepts and principles associated with their area(s) of study, and an ability to evaluate and interpret these within the context of that area of study.

  • an ability to present, evaluate and interpret qualitative and quantitative data, in order to develop lines of argument and make sound judgements in accordance with basic theories and concepts of their subject(s) of study.


Students who achieve at Level 4 will be able to:

  • Evaluate the appropriateness of different approaches to solving problems related to their area(s) of study and/or work.

  • Communicate the results of their study/work accurately and reliably, and with structured and coherent arguments

  • Undertake further training and develop new skills within a structured and managed environment.


Students who achieve at Level 4 will have:

  • The qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment requiring the exercise of some personal responsibility.

  • Students who achieve at Level 4 will have a sound knowledge of the basic concepts of a subject, and will have learned how to take different approaches to solving problems.

  • They will be able to communicate accurately and will have the qualities needed for employment requiring the exercise of some personal responsibility.

  • Students who achieve at Level 4 should have the ability to progress to Level 5 study.


Generic Assessment Criteria at Level 4

The criteria set out here in relation to essays and oral presentations are in accordance with the requirements of Level 4 study at Cornwall College. Students successfully completing their course of study at Level 4 should have knowledge of the underlying concepts and principles in relation to their areas of study, and an ability to evaluate and interpret these within context.
Students should also display the ability to present, evaluate, and interpret data in order to develop coherent argument and make sound judgements in accordance with theories and concepts of their subject of study.


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