Panjab university, chandigarh -160014 (india) (Estd under the Panjab University Act VII of 1947—enacted by the Govt of India) faculty of education syllabi



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PANJAB UNIVERSITY,

CHANDIGARH -160014 (INDIA)

(Estd. under the Panjab University Act VII of 1947—enacted by the Govt. of India)

FACULTY OF EDUCATION

SYLLABI

FOR

BACHELOR OF EDUCATION (B.ED.) REGULAR (SEMESTER SYSTEM)

Examinations, 2015
PANJAB UNIVERSITY, CHANDIGARH

Scheme outlines of tests, syllabi and courses of Reading for Bachelor of Education (B.Ed.) Gen.(Two Semesters) Examination, 2015 .

Note:- Use of all brands of non-programmable calculators having signs of ‘+’, ‘-’, ‘’, ‘’, ‘’ Only, is allowed in the examination centre (in paper II only), but these will not be provided by the university/college. Radio, Pagers/ Mobiles are not allowed in the examination. The examination shall consist of two parts as under.

1.1 Semester-I

Part-A (Theory)

S.No.

Paper

Subject

External

Practical



Internal

Practical



Internal

Evaluation



External

Theory


Total

1.

I

Philosophical and

Sociological bases of education


-------

5


5

40

50


2.

II

The Learner Nature and Development

-------

5


5

40

50


3.

III

Teaching Learning process and Evaluation

-------

5


5


40

50


4.

IV-A

School Management

-------

5


5


40


50


5.

V-A

ICT Skill development

16

6

6

32

60


6.

VI &VII

(one and two)



Methodology of Teaching of any Two of the following

-----


5
5

5
5

40
40

50
50

Total=360

Part-B (Practical)

There will be two component of Practical work. The distribution of the Practical work shall be as under:



S.No.

Components

Practical

External

internal

total

1.

II-A

WEP

30

20

50

2.

III-A

CES

-------

10

10

3.

III-B

HSP

30

20

50

Total Marks=110

Total of Semester-I

Part-A =360

Part-B=110

Total=470


WEP : Work Experience Programme

CES: Communication and Employability Skills

HSP: Health and Sports Programme
Semester-II

Part-A (Theory)

S.No.

Paper

Subject

External

Practical



Internal

Practical



Internal

Evaluation



External

Theory


Total

1.

I

Philosophical and

Sociological bases of education


-------

5


5

40

50


2.

II

The Learner Nature and Development

-------

5


5

40

50


3.

III

Teaching Learning process and Evaluation

-------

5


5


40

50


4.

IV-B

Guidance and Counselling

-------

5


5


40


50


5.

V-B

Any One of the following options:

-------

4

4

32

40


6.

VI &VII

(one and two)



Methodology of Teaching of any Two of the following

-----


5
5

5
5

40
40

50
50

Total=340

Paper Vth (PART-B) Any One of the following options:

(i) School Library and Information Services (ix) Yoga Education

(ii) Comparative Education (x) Value Education

(iii) Life Long Learning (xi) Educational Technology

(iv) Health and Physical Education (xii) Elementary Education

(v) Education of Children with special needs (xiii) Women Education & Indian Society

(vi) Population Education (xiv) Co-Curricular Activities in Schools

(vii) Distance Education and Open Learning (xv) E-Education Resource Development

(viii) Environmental Education

1.2 PAPERS-VI & VII : Methodology of Teaching of any two of the following :

1. Teaching of English 12 Teaching of Life Science

2. Teaching of Hindi 13. Teaching of Physical Science

3. Teaching of Punjabi 14. Teaching of Home Science

4. Teaching of Sanskrit 15. Teaching of Fine Arts

5. Teaching of History 16. Teaching of Music

6. Teaching of Geography 17. Teaching of Physical Education

7. Teaching of Economics 18. Teaching of Agriculture

8. Teaching of Social Studies 19. Teaching of Computer Education

9. Teaching of Commerce 20. Teaching of Political Science

10. Teaching of Mathematics 21. Teaching of Public Administration

11. Teaching of Science 22. Teaching of Sociology




Part-B (Practical)

There will be two component of Practical work. The distribution of the Practical work shall be as under:



S. No.

Components

Marks

Internal

Total

Practicals

External

1.

I-A

Initiatory School Experiences

00

15+15=30

30

2.

I-B

School Experience Programme

70+70=140

30+30=60

200

3.

II-B

Simple Expressional Competencies

30

20

50


4.

IV

Co-Curricular, Cultural and

Community Activities



00

10

10


Total Marks=110



Total of Semester-II

Part-A =340

Part-B=290

Total=630



Total of Semester-I &II

470+630 = 1100
Guidelines:

(i) Admission to the B.Ed. course is subject based. At the time of the admission, each candidate shall opt

for two teaching subjects. A candidate can opt for only those teaching subjects, which he/she has

studied at graduation/post graduation level. The candidate must have studied the major subject of the

subject combination for at least two years at Bachelor’s level/Master’s level.

(ii) The students having honours course shall opt for major subject in which they have obtained honours,

the minor subject should have been studied at least for one year/one semester.

(iii) The candidates who have passed additional subjects at graduation level can opt for only those

teaching subjects, marks of which are taken into account for the purpose of calculating percentage of

marks at graduation level.

(iv) B.Com./B.B.A./M.Com. Graduates/Post-Graduates may opt two teaching subjects. One is Teaching

of Commerce and the other shall be Teaching of Economics or any one of the languages i.e. English,

Hindi, Punjabi and Sanskrit.
Note: Students with B.Com./B.B.A. degree shall be considered in Commerce stream only, even

though they may have passed additional Arts subjects unless they have done Masters in Arts.


(v) B.C.A. Graduates may opt for Teaching of Computer Science and Applications as one subject. The

other subject shall be Teaching of Mathematics or any one of the languages i.e. English, Hindi,

Punjabi and Sanskrit.

(vi) B.E./B.Tech. Graduates shall opt for any two subject combinations out of Mathematics, Computer

Science, Science or Language.

(vii) B.Sc. (Home Science) graduates may opt for two Teaching Subjects. One is Teaching of Home

Science and other shall be out of the subjects studied by the candidates at the Graduate level i.e.

Teaching of Science or any one of the languages i.e. English, Hindi, Punjabi and Sanskrit.

(viii) B.Sc. (Medical) graduates shall opt for two teaching subjects out of the following :

(a) Teaching of Life Science/Teaching of Science.

(b) Teaching of Physical Science.

(c) Teaching of any one of the languages i.e. English, Hindi, Punjabi and Sanskrit.

(ix) B.Sc. (Non-Medical) graduates shall opt for two teaching subjects out of the following :

(a) Teaching of Science/Physical Science.

(b) Teaching of Mathematics/Teaching of Computer Science.

(c) Teaching of any one of the languages i.e. English, Hindi, Punjabi and Sanskrit.

(x) Arts Graduates may opt for any two teaching subjects selecting one each from the following (a) and (b):

(a) Teaching of Social Studies/Fine Arts/Music/Physical Education/Home Science/Economics/History/

Geography/Political Science/Sociology/Public Administration.

(b) Teaching of any one of the languages i.e. English, Hindi, Punjabi and Sanskrit provided that the

candidate has studied the subject at the graduate level.

(xi) Graduates with Fine Arts/Music/Computer Education/Home Science/Physical Education /Mathematics /

Statistics/Quantitative Techniques shall opt for any of these subjects with the other subject

combinations available in the offered college.

(xii) Teaching of Social Studies shall be opted by the graduates who have taken up any two of the

following subjects at B.A./M.A. level (In case a candidate who have done masters/higher degree with

50% each in any two of the following can also opt for teaching of Social Studies):

(i) History (ii) Geography (iii) Political Science (iv) Sociology (v) Economics (vi) Public

Administration (vii) Philosophy (viii) Psychology (ix) Education (x) Defence Studies (xi) Religious

Studies.
NOTE :

1. The subject of Teaching of Fine Arts shall be offered to a candidate who had taken up Fine Arts/Fashion

Design/Fashion Technology at his/her B.A. examination or possesses B.A. Degree with Diploma in

Drawing and Painting or Arts and Craft Teacher's course from a recognized institution.

2. The candidates should have studied the major subject for two years of Bachelor’s degree level/Master’s

Degree level. However, the minor subject should have been studied for at least one year/one semester at

the graduation level.

3. The candidates shall be given the required subject combinations depending upon their availability in the

colleges.

4. Candidates who have passed Shastri/Gyani/Prabhakar/Honors/Elective Subjects in languages can opt for

two language combinations provided they have studied the other language for at least one

year/one semester.
1.3 In the above said subject combinations, one subject should be major which the candidates have studied

for three years at graduation level/for two years at Master’s level, the other subject may be minor which

the candidate has studied for at least one year at graduation level.
Note:-

(i) Teaching of Physical Education shall be taught by an approved lecturer in Physical Education

(M.A. Physical Education/M.P.Ed.).

(ii) Teaching of Computer Education shall be taught by the Lecturer who has qualified M.C.A.,

M.Sc. (IT/CS) with B.Ed. preferably M.Ed.

(iii) Paper V-(Part B) Option (i) School Library Services and Option (iv) Health and Physical

Education shall be taught by the approved College Librarian and D.P.E./Lecturer in Physical

Education respectively.

(iv) ICT Skill Development Paper V (Part-A) and Component II (Part A) shall be taught by the

Computer Lecturer/Instructor (Graduate with PGDCA or One Year Post Graduate Diploma of



computer or higher qualification from recognized institution).


    1. For the setting of Theory Question papers, the following rules should be observed for both semesters)

  1. In paper I, II and III, 80 marks are for external theory (40 in each semester for said subjects), 10 marks are for Internal Practical work( 5 marks are for each semester in said subjects), 10 marks are for continuous Internal evaluation (5 marks are for each semester for said subjects). In paper IV (Part A in First Semester) and Paper IV (Part B) in Second semester) 40 marks are for External Theory, 5 marks are for Internal Practical work and 5 marks are for continuous internal evaluation. In paper V (Part A in First semester), 32 marks are for external Theory, 16 marks are for External Practical, 6 marks for Internal practical work and 6 marks for continuous internal evaluation. In Paper V (Part B) in Second semester), 32 marks are for external theory, 4 marks for Internal Practical work and, 4 marks for continuous internal evaluation. Two teaching methodology papers IV & VII opted by the candidate in 1.2 will be of 100 marks (50 in both semesters) each i.e. 80 marks. 40 marks in each semester for both Teaching subject for External theory, 10 marks (5 marks in both semesters) for internal preparatory file and 10 marks (5 marks in both semester) for continuous internal evaluation)

  2. The papers shall be set by external examiner, each paper will be of two hours duration. In papers I, II and III (in both semesters) the Question paper shall be divided into four parts. First three parts will pertain three units of the course content. Two question will be set from each unit of the course & candidates will be required to attempt on question from each part. Each question will carry 10 marks. Fourth part of the Question paper will be compulsory. It will consist of two short answer types’ questions and these questions will cover the entire course. Each short answer type question will be of 5 marks and answer should not exceed 90 words. Each theory paper in both semester will be of 10X3 = 30+5x2 = 10 total 40 marks ( 5marks are for continuous internal evaluation done on the basis of written assignments, snap tests, participation in discussions held in the class, term papers, attendance etc in both semesters. 5x2 = 10. 5 marks are allotted for internal evaluation of the practicals work in each paper for both semester. Total marks allotted to each paper in both semester are 100 (40+5+5, 40+5+5)

  3. Paper IV shall be divided into two semesters -paper IV - (PART A, School Management , in Sem-i) and paper IV – (PART B, Guidance and Counselling, in Sem-ii). In paper IV - (PART A) the question paper shall be divided into four parts. First three parts will pertain three units of the course content, two questions will be set from each unit of the course, in each part of the question paper. The candidate will be required to attempt one question from each part. Each question will carry 12 marks.

Fourth part of the question paper will be compulsory. It will consist of two short answer type questions and these questions will cover the entire course content uniformly. Each short type question will be of two marks and the answer should not exceed 30 words. This theory paper will be of (12 3) = 36 + (2 2 = 4)= 40 marks. In paper IV- (PART B) the question paper shall be divided into three parts. First two parts will pertain two units of the course content, two questions will be set from each unit of the course, in each part of the question paper. The candidate will be required to attempt one question from each part. Each question will carry 12 marks. Third part of the question paper will be compulsory. It will consist of four short answer type questions and these questions will cover the entire course content uniformly. Each short type question will be of four marks and the answer should not exceed 75 words. This theory paper will be of ( 12 2) = 24 + (4 4) = 16 = 40 marks. In paper IV - (PART A) and IV - (PART B) 5 marks are for continuous internal evaluation done on the basis of written assignments, snap tests, participation in the discussions held in the class, term papers, attendance etc. 5 marks are allotted for the internal evaluation of the practical work. Total marks allotted to paper IV- PART A and IV - PART B are 50 each. For external theory examination there shall be two hours for each paper i.e IV (Part –A & Part –B)

(iv) Paper V shall be divided into two parts – Paper V - PART A (ICT Skill, in Sem-i) and Paper V - PART B (for one subject opted by the candidate from the list given, in Sem-ii. In paper V – PART A the question paper shall be divided into four parts. First three parts will pertain two units of the course content, two questions will be set from each unit of the course, in each part of the question paper. The candidate will be required to attempt one question from each part. Each question will carry 8 marks. Third part of the question paper will be compulsory. It will consist of two short answer type questions and these questions will cover the entire course content uniformly. Each short type question will be of four marks and the answer should not exceed 75 words. This theory paper will be of (8 3 = 24) + (4 2 = 8) = 32 marks. In paper V - PART B, the question paper shall be divided into three parts. First two parts will pertain two units of the course content, two questions will be set from each unit of the course, in each part of the question paper. The candidate will be required to attempt one question from each part. Each question will carry 12 marks. Third part of the question paper will be compulsory. It will consist of two short answer type questions and these questions will cover the entire course content uniformly. Each short answer type question will be of four marks and the answer should not exceed 75 words. This theory paper will be of (12 2 = 24) + (4 2 = 8) = 32 marks. For paper V - PART A, 28 marks are allotted for practical work out of which 16 marks are for external (Practical), 6 marks are for (internal) practical work and 6 marks for continuous internal evaluation. Total marks for paper V - PART A = 32 + (16 + 6 + 6) = 60, in Sem-i. In paper V - PART B, 4 marks are for (internal) practical work and 4 marks are allotted to continuous internal evaluation. Total marks for paper V- PART B = 32 +(4 + 4) = 40, in Sem-ii. For external theory examination there shall be two hours for each paper i.e V (Part –A & Part –B)


(v) Internal evaluation for practical work in the above papers shall be done by the committee consisting of atleast three members of faculty (of the particular subject) with the principal as moderator.

(vi) Papers IV- A and IV- B as well as for Papers V- A and V-B will be in separate semesters.

(vii) Papers VI and VII will comprise of Methodology of Teaching of any two teaching subjects in which the scheme of marks will be as follows : 2 x{2×(40+5+5=50)} = 200 marks,

(viii) Paper VI and VII will be of 50 marks in both semesters out of which 40 marks are for external theory in both semester, 5 marks are for internal practical work (preparation of blue print of question paper – 2½ marks and book review in the continuous internal evaluation. Each question paper shall be divided into four parts in both semester, first three parts will pertain three units of the course content in both semester. Two questions will be set from each unit of the course in each part of the question paper. The candidates will be required to attempt one questions from each part in both semester. Each question will carry 10 marks in both semester. Forth part of the question paper will be compulsory. It will consist of two short answer type questions from IV Unit of the course content in both semester. Each short answer type question will be of 5 marks and answer should not exceed 90 words in both semesters. This theory paper will be in both semester 2 x (10x3) + (5 x 2) = 80 marks. 10 marks will be in both semester, 5 marks are for continuous internal evaluation in each semester will be done on the basis of written assignment (01), snap tests, participation in the discussions held in class room ,term paper attendance etc. Total marks allotted to each paper are 100.



1.5 Each theory paper will be allotted 6 periods a week and methodology paper will be allotted 8 periods a

week.


1.6 There will be atleast two demonstration lessons in each teaching subject to be delivered by the concerned subject teachers.

To appear in the final exam., qualifying marks in each of these components is 40%.

PAPER-I

PHILOSOPHICAL AND SOCIOLOGICAL BASES OF EDUCATION
SEMESTER - I
OBJECTIVES : To enable students to

  • make student teachers understand the concept of education.

  • understand the historical background of education in India.

  • help them to know the concept of philosophy and its relationship with education.

  • enable them to know the concept of sociology and its relationship with education.

  • understand socio-cultural context of education.

  • sensitize the student teachers towards human values and teachers’ role in creation of value based system of education.

  • acquaint the student teachers with the recent trends in education.

Total Marks : 50

External Theory : 40

Internal Practical : 5

Internal Evaluation : 5

COURSE CONTENT
UNIT – I


  1. Concept of Education ; Indian and Western, Types of education; informal, formal and non-formal, role of home, school and society as agencies of education.

  2. Indian systems of Education : Ancient, medieval and modern.

  3. Factors determining aims of education : Individual, Social, cultural, political and economic.

UNIT – II

  1. Concept of Sociology, Education as an Agent of social adjustment and development: relationship between sociology and education.

  2. Culture: concept, characteristics and its interactions with education.

  3. Education for democracy, national integration, international understanding and globalization.

UNIT – III

  1. Educational Provisions in Constitution of India.

  2. National knowledge commission report: Recommendations on school education.


PRACTICAL WORK

Preparation of Report on Human Right Awareness in rural population.



SEMESTER – II

OBJECTIVES : To enable students to

  • help them to know the concept of philosophy and its relationship with education.

  • understand the educational philosophy of some reputed thinkers.

  • enable them to know the concept of sociology and its relationship with education.

  • understand socio-cultural context of education.

  • sensitize the student teachers towards human values and teachers’ role in creation of value based system of education.

  • acquaint the student teachers with the recent trends in education.

Total Marks : 50

External Theory : 40

Internal Practical : 5

Internal Evaluation : 5
COURSE CONTENT
UNIT – I


  1. Concept, nature and functions of philosophy, relationship between philosophy and education.

  2. Impact of idealism, naturalism and pragmatism on education.

  3. Contribution of Gandhi, Tagore and Aurobindo to educational thought and practice.

UNIT – II

  1. Values : Concept, types, sources and role of teacher in inculcating values.

  2. Human Resource Development : Concept, need and role of education in HRD.

  3. Human rights : Concept, role of education in promoting human rights.

UNIT - III

  1. Contemporary policy documents on education in India : NPE (1986), NCF (2005), RTE (2009) – Major suggestions and their implications.

PRACTICAL WORK

Community Work (Identification and diagnosis of the problems prevailing in the community) To be conducted under the subject teacher and project report to be submitted. Due weightage will be given to authenticated report.



BOOKS SUGGESTED:

Bhatia, K.K. (2005). Education in Emerging Indian Society. Ludhiana: Kalyani Publishers.

Bhatia, K.K. and Narang, C.L. (1992). Teacher and Education in Emerging Indian Society. Ludhiana: Tandon Publications.

Bhatia, K.K. and Narang, C.L. (2008). Philosophical and Sociological Bases of Education. Ludhiana: Tandon Publications.

Biswal, U.N. (2005). Philosophy of Education. New Delhi: Dominant Publishers and Distributors.

Blake, N.; Smeyers, P.; Smith, R. and Standish, P. (2003). The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Education. USA: Blackwell Publishing.

Brubacher, John S. (1969). Modern Philosophies of Education. New Delhi: Tata McGraw Hill.

Chaube, S.P. (1981). Philosophical and Sociological Foundations of Education. Agra: Ravi, Noudarnalya.

Dash, B.N. (2004). Theories of Education & Education in the Emerging Indian Society. New Delhi: Dominant Publishers and Distributors.

Dewey, John (1961). Democracy and Education. New York: Macmillan Company.

Goel, A. and Goel, S.L. (2005). Human Values and Education. New Delhi: Deep & Deep Publications Pvt. Ltd.

Goff, Phil (2001). Test your E-Sills. London : Hobler & Stoughton.

Halsey, A.H.; Lander, H.; Brown, P. and Nells, A.S. (1997). Education: Culture, Economy and Society. New York: Oxford University Press.

Howard, Om on and Sam, Carner (1976). Philosophical Foundation of Education. Columbus: Charles E., Merril.

Joshi, Kireet (2000). A National Agenda for Education. Delhi: The Mothersd’ Institute of Research.

Joshi, Kireet (2000). Education at Corssroads. Delhi: The Mother’s Institute of Rersearch.

Kabir, Humayun (1961). Indian Philosophy of Education. Bombay: Asia Publishing House.

Lynch, Marguerita, Mc Vay (2002). The Online Educator. London: Routledge Falmer, Taylor and Fancis Group.

Madhukar, Indira (2005). Internet-based Distance Learning. New Delhi: Authorspress.

Mathur, S.S. (1997). Philosophical and Sociological Foundations of Education. Agra: Vinod Pustak Mandir. Mathur, S.S. (1985). Sociological Approach to Indian Education. Agra: Vinod Pustak Mandir.

Mohanty, J. (1994). Indian Education in the Emerging Society. New Delhi: Sterling Pvt. Ltd.

Naseema, C. & Alam, M.A., From Blackboard to the Web, New Delhi: Kanishka Publishers, Distributors, 2004.

Nathan, Dev; Kelkar, Govind and Walter, Pierre (Eds.) (2004). Globalization and Indigenous People in Asia. New Delhi : Sage Publishers.

National Council of Teacher Education (1999). Gandhi on Education. New Delhi: NCERT.



National Curriculum Framework. (2005). www.ncert.nic.in

National Knowledge Commission (2007). Recommendations on School Education. Government of India. www.knowledgecommission.gov.in

National Policy on Education. (1986). Ministry of Human Resource Development. Government of India.

PAPER-II

THE LEARNER : NATURE AND DEVELOPMENT

Objectives:

  • To understand the learner and his abilities.

  • To understand the process of human development with special reference to adolescence.



  • To understand the process of learning and the factors influencing it.




  • To understand the psychology of learners with special needs and teach them accordingly.

  • To make the students familiar with administration and interpretation of psychological tests.


SEMESTER- I

Total Marks : 50

External Theory : 40

Internal Practical : 5

Internal Evaluation : 5

COURSE CONTENT
UNIT-I

(a) Educational Psychology – Concept, Nature, Scope and Importance.

(b) Growth and Development – Concept, Principles, stage of adolescence period with special reference to issues of stress and strain.

(c) Heredity and Environment - Concepts, Laws and relative role of Heredity and Environment in the development of learner.



UNIT-II

(a) Nature of Learning – Learning as a process and as an outcome, Factors affecting learning.

(b) Theories of Learning – Trial and Error theory, Classical Conditioning, Kohler's Insight theory.

(c) Creativity – Concept, dimensions and identification of creative potential, educational programmes for developing creativity.



UNIT-III

(a) Children with special needs: Meaning, Types: Gifted, Delinquents, Educationally Backward Children and their educational programmes.



INTERNAL PRACTICAL
Administration and interpretation of any one psychological tests, selecting one from each group mentioned below :

  1. Learning

  2. Creativity.


SEMESTER-II

Objectives:

  1. To understand the learner and his abilities.

  2. To understand the nature of personality, intelligence and its assessment.

  3. To make the student teacher familiar with the concept and implications of emotional

intelligence.

  1. To understand and promote the process of healthy adjustment.

  2. To understand the basic concepts of elementary statistics.

  3. To make the students familiar with administration and interpretation of psychological tests.

Total Marks : 50

External Theory : 40

Internal Practical : 5

Internal Evaluation : 5

COURSE CONTENT

UNIT-I

(a) Intelligence – Meaning, theories of intelligence (Spearman, Thurstone, Gardner and Guilford’s), measurement of intelligence : (Verbal, Non-Verbal, Performance tests), uses and limitations of intelligence tests.

(b) Emotional Intelligence : Concept, dimensions, role of teacher in promoting emotional intelligence.

(c) Motivation – Concept, types and techniques for enhancing motivation.



UNIT-II

(a) Personality – Concept, determinants, assessment.

(b) Individual differences - Concept, Areas and Educational Implications.

(c) Stress: Meaning, Types and Coping Strategies.



UNIT-III
(a) Elementary Educational Statistics – Meaning, uses and computation of measures central tendency (mean, median and mode), measure of variability (standard deviation), measurement of correlation by rank difference method.

PRACTICAL WORK

Administration and interpretation of any one psychological tests, selecting one from each group mentioned below :

(a) Intelligence.

(b) Personality.



BOOKS SUGGESTED :

Bhatia, K.K. (2008). Bases of Educational psychology. Ludhiana: Kalyani Publishers.

Chauhan, S.S. (2002). Advanced Educational Psychology. New Delhi: Vikas Publishing House.

Dandapani, S. (2000). A Textbook of Advanced Educational Psychology.New Delhi: Anmol Publications.

Dash, M. (2000). Education of Exceptional Children. New Delhi: Atlantic Publishers and Distributors.

De, Ceco & Crawford, L. (1988). The Psychology of Learning and Instruction. New Delhi: Prentice Hall

Garret, H.E. (1981). Statistics in Psychology and Education. Bombay: Vakils, Feffer and Simons.

Goleman, Daniel (1996). Emotional Intelligence. Bantam Books.

Heward and Orlansky (1992). Exceptional Children. New York: Maxwell Macmillan International.

Kakkar, S.B. (2001). Educational Psychology. New Delhi: Prentice Hall of India.

Kirk Samuel (1997). Educating Exceptional Children. New York: Houghton Mifflin Company.

Mangal, S.K. (2002). Advanced Educational Psychology. New Delhi: Prentice Hall of India.

Maslow, A.H. (1970). Motivation and Personality. 2nd Ed., New York: Harper & Row.

Morgan, Clifford; Kind, R.R. and Weise, John (1999). Introduction to Psychology. New Delhi: Tata McGraw Hill.

Panda, K.C. (2001). Education of Exceptional Children. New Delhi: Vikas Publishing House Pvt. Ltd.

Sahu, Binod Kumar (2002). Education of Exceptional Children. Ludhiana: Kalyani Publishers.

Sidhu, Kulbir Singh (1998). Statistics in Education and Psychology. Jalandhar: International Publishers.

Singh, Dalip. (2006). Emotional Intelligence At Work : A Professional Guide. New Delhi: Response Books.

Tiwari, Govind and Pal Rama (1997). Experimental Psychology: A Dynamic Approach. Agra: Vinod Pustak Mandir.

Verma, Preeti and Srivastava, D. N. (1996). Modern Experiment of Psychology. Agra: Vinod Pustak Mandir.

Wheldall, Kevin (2006). Developments in Educational Psychology. New York: Routledge

Woolfork, Anita (2004). Educational Psychology: Reason Education (Singapore). New Delhi: Indian Branch.


B2-(Paper III)

TEACHING LEARNING : PROCESS AND EVALUATION

SEMESTET- I

Objectives:

After this course, pupil teachers will be able to :



    • Explain the concept & relation of teaching and learning & describe the principles of teaching.

    • Explain the concept of Educational technology and models of teaching.

    • Explain the innovations in Educational technology with special reference to Micro teaching and Programmed Instructions.

Total Marks : 50

External Theory : 40

Internal Practical : 5

Internal Evaluation : 5

COURSE CONTENT

SEMESTR- I
UNIT-I

(a) Concept of teaching and learning, relationship between teaching and learning.

(b) Maxims and Principles of teaching.

(c) Phases of teaching and Levels of learning.

(d) Instructional objectives in terms of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

UNIT-II

(a) Meaning, importance and Approaches of Educational Technology.

(b) Models of teaching: Meaning, Assumptions and Fundamental Elements of a Model of Teaching.

(c) Suchman's Inquiry Training Model.

(d) Flander's Interactional Analysis System.

UNIT-III


  1. Programmed Learning — Concept, Principles and Types of Programmed Learning (Linear, Branching, Mathetics and CAI ).

(b) Class Communication – Concept, process and types.

(c) Barriers and Remedial measures of class room communication

– Types of Classroom problems.

– Solutions of Classroom Problems.


INTERNAL PRACTICAL

Preparation of Programmed Instruction Material (linear programme of 30 frames)




SEMESTER-II

Objectives:

After this course, pupil teachers will be able to :



    • Explain the concept of Educational technology and models of teaching.

    • Explain the concept of class room problems and solve them through Action Research.

    • Explain the recent trends in evaluation.

Total Marks : 50

External Theory : 40

Internal Practical : 5

Internal Evaluation : 5

COURSE CONTENT

UNIT-I

(c) Role of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in teaching and learning.

(a) Concept and principles of selection and utilization of learning resources.

(b) Online learning resources : e-journals and e-books.



UNIT-II

(a) Action Research – Meaning, goals and steps in action research.

(b) Concept and Principles of Measurement and Evaluation.

(c) Types of Evaluation – Diagnostic, Formative and Summative.



UNIT-III

(c) Continuous Comprehensive Evaluation – Concept and techniques (Observation, assignment and project)

(d) Recent trends in Examination Reforms

- Semester System : Concept and application

- Grading System : Concept and application

INTERNAL PRACTICAL

Action Research


BOOKS SUGGESTED :
Aggarwal, R.N. and Bipin Asthana (1983). Educational Measurement & Evaluation. Agra: Vinod Pustak Mandir.

Apter, Michel, J. (1968). The New Technology of Education. London: MacMillan.

Bhatia, K.K. & Sidhu, H.S. (1994). Foundations of Teaching Learning Process, Ludhiana: Tandon Publication.

Bhushan, A. and Ahuja, M. (1992). Educational Technology. Patiala: Bawa Publishers.

Chauhan, S.S. (1978). A Textbook of Programmed Instruction. New Delhi: Sterling.

Dececco, John, P. (1964). Educational Technology, Reading in Programmed Instruction. Holt Rinehart and Winston.

Joyce, Bruce and Marsha Wali. (1985). Model of Teaching. New Delhi: Prentice Hall of India.

Mangal, S.K. (2002). Fundamental of Educational Technology. Ludhiana: Parkash Brothers.

Richmond, Menneth (1969). The Teaching Revolution, London : Methuen & Co.

Ruheia, S.P. (1973). Educational Technology. New Delhi: Raj Prakashan.

Sampath, K. ; Panneerselvam A. and Santhanam, S. (1984). Introduction to Educational Technology. New Delhi: Sterling Publishers.

Sharma, R.A. (2005). Educational Technology. Meerut: Modern Publishers.

Sharma, R.A. (1977). Shikshan Takniki. Meerut: Modern Publishers.

Singh, L.C. and Sharma, R.D. (2002). Micro Teaching. Agra : Bhargwa Book House.


SEM -I

Paper-IV

Paper IV-(PART-A): SCHOOL MANAGEMENT

Total Marks : 50

External Theory : 40

Internal Practical : 05

Internal Evaluation : 05

Objectives:

After the course, pupil teachers will be able to :



  • Understand the Concept and operational aspects of school management.

  • Enlist the physical resources of the school and their maintenance.

  • Understand the importance of social life in school and the role of administrators and the teachers in it.

  • Become successful teachers in future.

  • Develop practical skills in organizing school programmes and activities.


COURSE CONTENTS

UNIT-I: ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT

(a) School as Organization: Meaning, objectives, need, scope, types and principles of school organization, administration and management.

(b) School Plant: importance, Essential characteristics, selection of site and Maintenance of different School Components.

(c) Institutional Planning: Meaning, objectives, advantages and characteristics of Institutional planning. Preparation of an institutional plan.



UNIT-II : ESSENTIAL FACETS OF SCHOOL ORGANIZATION

(a) Leadership: Concept, Need & Development of Leadership Qualities among teachers and students.

(b) School Time Table: Importance, types and principles of time table construction.

(c) Discipline, Concept, Bases of Discipline, Causes of indiscipline and its remedial measures. Rewards and punishment as techniques of maintaining discipline.



UNIT-III: QUALITY ENHANCEMENT AND MANAGEMENT IN SCHOOLS

(a) Supervision : Meaning, aims, principles, areas, types and procedures of supervision, modern trends in supervision.

(b) School Records and Registers: Importance, types and essential requirements and maintenance of school records.

(c) Co-curricular Activities: Meaning, importance, principles of organizing co-curricular activities- Morning Assembly, NSS/NCC, Field trips.



PRACTICAL WORK

Total Marks: : (05)

Construction of Time Table : (03)

Maintenance of Attendance Registers. : (02)


BOOKS SUGGESTED :

Bhatia, K.K. and Singh, Jaswant (2002). Principles & Practice of School Management. Ludhiana: Tandon Publication.

Bhatnagar, R.P. and Verma, I.B. (1978). Educational Administration at College Level. Meerut: Loyal Book.

Dash, B.N. (1996). School Organisation Administration & Management. Hyderabad: Neel Kamal Publications Pvt. Ltd.

Sachdeva, M.S. (2001). School Management. Ludhiana: Bharat Book Centres.

Sarkaria, M.S.; Singh, Jaspal and Gera, Manju (2008). Modern School Management. Ludhiana: Kalyani Publishers.

Sodhi, T.S. and Suri, Anaina (2002). Management of School Education. Patiala: Bawa Publication.

Sharma, T.S. (2005). School Management and Administration. Patiala: Shaheed-E-Azam Printing Press.



SEMESTER- II

PAPER IV-(PART-B) : GUIDANCE AND COUNSELLING

Total Marks : 50

External Theory : 40

Internal Practical : 05

Internal Evaluation : 05
Objectives:


  • To help the student teachers to understand the meaning, aims, objectives and need of Guidance.

  • To acquaint the students with various types of Guidance.

  • To develop skills in administering and interpreting testing and non-testing tools of data collection and to understand the potential of students.

  • To enable the student teachers to organize guidance programme in the secondary schools.

COURSE CONTENTS

Unit-I

  1. Historical Perspective of Guidance & Counseling in Indian context.

  2. Guidance- Meaning, Need, Aims & Objectives, Principles and Scope.

  3. Counseling- Meaning, Need, Aims & Objectives, Principles, Difference between Guidance & Counseling.

  4. Organization of Guidance Programme at Secondary Level, Guidance Programme for Dropouts and Drug Abused.

Unit-II

  1. Tool and Techniques of Data Collection:

Testing Techniques (Interest Inventories, Aptitude and Achievement Tests)

Non-Testing Techniques (Interview, Rating Scale, Cumulative Record)



  1. Educational and Information Service (Techniques of Dissemination), Placement Services.

  2. Counseling Service- Meaning, Purpose & Approaches (Directive, Non-Directive and Eclectic counseling), Role of Counselor.

  3. Recent Trends in Guidance

Practical Work:

  1. Group Guidance-One career Talk

  2. Make a study of Guidance Centre-Prepare a report

  3. Practical related to career counseling

SUGGESTED BOOKS:

Aggarwal, J.C., Educational & Vocational Guidance and Counseling, Jalandhar: Doaba House

Asch, M. (2000). Principles of Guidance and Counseling. New Delhi: Sarup and Sons.

Bhatia, K.K. (2002). Principles of Guidance & counseling. Ludhiana: Kalyani Publishers.

Gibson, R.L. and Mitchell, M.H. (2003). Introduction to Counseling and Guidance. New Delhi: Pearson Education. 

Jonse, R.N. (2000). Introduction to Counseling skills: Text and Activities. New Delhi, Sage Publications

Linda Seligman (1994). Developmental Career Counseling and Assessment. (2nd Ed.) London: Sage Publications.

Pandey, K. P. (2000). Educational and Vocational Guidance in India. Varanasi: VishwaVidyalaya Prakashan.

Rathus, S. A. & Nevied, J. S. (1980). Adjustment and Growth: The challenges of life. New York: Rinehart and Winston.

Robinson (2005). Principles and Procedures in Student Counselling. New York: Harper & Row.

Safaya, B.N. (2002). Guidance & Counseling. Chandugarh: Abhishek Publications.

Sharma, R.A. (2008). Fundamentals of Guidance and Counseling. Meerut: R Lall Book Depot.

Sharma, Tara Chand (2002). Modern Methods of Guidance and Counseling. New Delhi: Sarup and Sons.

Shertzer, Bruce and Stone, Shelly C. (1974). Fundamentals of Counseling. London: Houghton Missli.

Sidhu, H.S. (2005). Guidance and Counseling. Patiala: Twenty First Century.

Sodhi, T.S. and Suri, S.P. (1999). Guidance & Counseling. Patiala: Bawa Publication.

Strang, R. (2005). Counselling Techniques in Colleges and Secondary Schools. New York: Harper.

SEMESTER-I

Paper V

Paper V-(PART A) ICT Skill Development

Total Marks

:60

External Theory

: 32

Internal Evaluation

:06

External Practical

:16

Internal Practical

:06

COURSE CONTENTS

Unit I


  1. ICT: Meaning, importance and tools of ICT

  2. Classification of Computers

  3. Generations of computers

  4. Computer Hardware: Input-Output Devices

Unit II

  1. Memory of computers: Primary and Secondary

  2. Introduction to Operating System

    1. Features of GUI (MS-Windows) and CLI (MS-DOS)

    2. Files and directory operations

    3. Windows Explorer and desktop

  3. Introduction to Application Software

    1. Word Processor

    2. Spreadsheets

    3. Presentations

    4. Database Management System

Unit III

  1. Applications of computers in various fields and specifically in education

  2. Characteristics of a good computerized lesson plan

  3. Application of computer in Teaching Learning Process (Attendance, Evaluation, eContent, daily planner etc.)

  4. Internet: Introduction, advantages and disadvantages

Practical

  1. Windows, DOS, and Presentation

Suggestive Readings

Kumar, Khushvinder and Kumar, Sunil (2004). Computer Education. Gurusar Sadhar: GBD Publications.

Kumar, Khushvinder and Kumar, Sunil (2004). ICT Skill Development. Gurusar Sadhar: GBD Publications.

Rajaraman, V. (2004). Fundamental of Computers. New Delhi: Prentice Hall of India Pvt. Ltd.

Sharma, Lalit (2006). Computer Education. Ferozpur Cantt: Wintech Publications.

Sinha, P.K. (1992). Computer Fundamentals. New Delhi: BPB Publications.

Singh, Tarsem (2009). Basic Computer Education. Ludhiana: Tandon Brothers.

Singh, Tarsem (2009).ICT Skill Development. Ludhiana: Tandon Brothers.


SEM-II

Paper V- (PART B)
(i) SCHOOL LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SERVICES

Total Marks : 40

External Theory : 32

Internal Evaluation : 04

Internal Practical : 04

Objectives:


  • To enable the student- teachers to develop an understanding of meaning, concept and nature of school library services.

  • To impart knowledge to student teachers about the need and importance of library services in the present school education.

  • To acquaint them with basic principles of school libraries.

  • To acquaint and prepare student-teachers for the application of information technologies in school libraries.

Unit-I

  1. Meaning, aims & Objectives, Need and Importance of School Library in Education.

  2. Specific problems of School Library and their solutions

  3. Five laws of Library science and their solutions

  4. Open and Close access system, Library-rules and regulations

Unit-II

  1. Cataloguing and Classification

  2. Circulation Service: charging and discharging system (Ledger, Newark & Browne)

  3. Library Centered Teaching and role of Library teacher/Student in developing and making use of a School Library, Library period.

  4. Reference books, E-Library, Library Softwares.

Practical Work:

Any two from the following:



  1. To prepare entries of 10 titles in the Accession Register.

  2. Classification of at least 10 books at 3 digits level according to DDC.

  3. Important web sites for E-Books, E-Journals and other study material for Schools.

Books Recommended:

Devi, Savitri and Johri, Nutan (1986). Bibliographic Reprints: Library Science and Informatics. New Delhi: NASSDOC

Kaur, Sumeet School Library and Information Services. Ludhiana: Tandon Publications.

Kumar, Krishana (1997). Library Organisation. Vikas Publishing House Pvt Ltd.

Singh, Sewa (1985-1990). Indian Library and Information Science Literature. New Delhi: Ess Ess Publications.

Singh, Sewa; Vir Malhan, Inder and Arora, R.L. (1971-1980). Indian Library Literature. New Delhi: Today and Tomorrow's.

Upneja, Sunil K. (2007). School Libray Services. Ludhiana: Tandon Publishers.

Wadhawan, Rajan (2009). School Library Services. Ludhiana: Tandon Publications.



(ii) COMPARATIVE EDUCATION

Total Marks : 40

External Theory : 32

Internal Evaluation : 04

Internal Practical : 04

Objectives :-

After completing the course, the teachers shall be able to :



  • Describe the meaning, concept, aims, scope and limitations of comparative education.

  • Compare and contrast foundations of education in U.S.A., Australia and India.

  • Discuss new trends, innovations and expenditure in education.

  • Compare and contrast primary and secondary education.

  • Acquaint the students with universalization of elementary education.

  • Compare and contrast distance education, educational administration and its different agencies.

  • Acquaint the students with vocationalization.

COURSE CONTENTS :

UNIT – I

  1. Meaning, Concept, Aims, Scope with special reference to comparative education and factors influencing education system in India.

  2. Foundation of education with special reference to Social, cultural, Economical, Political and Geographical areas in U.S.A., Australia and India.

  3. New trends, Innovations and Expenditure in education with special reference to India.

UNIT - II

  1. Primary education (Aims, Content, Methods of instruction and Evaluation system) in Australia, U.S.A., and India. Concept of universalization of Elementary education and its implications in India.

  2. Secondary education and its vocationalization in Australia, U.S.A. and India.

  3. Distance education (Meaning, Scope and its Structure), Educational Administration and agencies in U.S.A., Australia and India.

PRACTICAL WORK:

Visit to a Secondary School or Centre of Higher Education to review course study, Institutional Practices and the Examination System and write its report. It will be compulsory for all the students.



SELECTED READINGS:

Bexday, G.Z.L. (1964). Comparative Methods in Education. : New Delhi Oxford and IBH Publishing Co.

Chaube, S.P. (1985). Features of Comparative Education. Agra: Vindo Pustak Mandir.

Chaube, S.P. and Chaube, A. (2001). Comparative Education. New Delhi: Vikas Publishing House, Pvt Ltd.

Dutt, B. Surya, Venkata and Rao, D.B. (2004). Comparative Education. New Delhi: Saujanya Books.

Hans, Nicholas (1961). Comparative Education. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul.

Kandel, L.L. (1959). Studies in Comparative Eduaction. New York: George Harrup.

Kubow, Patrica K. and Fossum, Paul R. (2002). Comparative Education Exploring issues in International Context. New Jersey: Prentice Hall, United State.

Mishra, B.K. and Mohanty, R.K. (2000). Trends and Issues in Indian Education. Meerut: Surya Publication.

Rai, B.C. (2005). Comparative Education. Lucknow: Prakashan Kendra.

Sharma, Y.K. (2004). Comparative Education. Delhi: Kanishaka Publisher.

Shrivastva, S.K. (2006). Comparative Education. New Delhi: Vedams Books Pvt. Ltd.

Sodhi, T.S. (2003). Text Book of comparative Education. New Delhi: Vikas Publishing House, Pvt., Ltd.

(iii) LIFE LONG LEARNING

Total Marks : 40

External Theory : 32

Internal Evaluation : 04

Internal Practical : 04
Objectives:


  • To enable the student teachers to develop an understanding of the meaning and concept of Life Long Learning.

  • To impart knowledge to student teachers about the problems and difficulties coming in the way of achieving full literacy in the country.

  • To prepare them to create awareness among illiterate adults for their development.

  • To acquaint the student teachers with chief characteristics of an adult learner, different methods and evaluation of Life Long Learning.

  • To enlighten the student teachers about the Life Long Learning policies of the country.

COURSE CONTENTS

Unit-I

  1. Meaning and concept of Life Long Learning.

  2. Aims and Objectives of Life Long Learning

  3. Need and Importance of Life Long Learning for the development of an individual for social change

  4. Problems and suggestive measures for Life Long Learning.

Unit-II

  1. Various programmes of Life Long Learning in India with special reference to ; NAEP, NPE & NLM

  2. Adult learner- characteristics, problems and motivation

  3. Life long teaching- Different methods, Role of Mass Media.

  4. Evaluation of Life Long Learning.

Practical Work:

  • Field based project work

  • Assignment, seminar and over all performance

Books Suggested:

Chopra, Rita (1993). Adult Education. Bombay: Himalaya Publishing House.

Kundu, C.L. (1987). Adult Education Principles: Practice & Prospects. New Delhi: Sterling Publishers Pvt. Ltd.

Ministry of Education (1987). Adult Education Research- Future Directions.

Prasad, Rajinder (2008). Adult Education. New Delhi: APH Publishing Corporation.

Singh, A.K. (1988). A Micro Analysis of Adult Education in India. New Delhi: National Book Organisation.

Sodhi, T.S. and Multani (1989). Comparative Studies in Adult Education. Ambala: The Association Publishers.

Thakur, Devendra (1980). Adult Education and Mass Literacy. New Delhi: Deep & Deep Publications.

Thrope, Mary & Grangeon, David (1987). Open Learning for Adults. U.K. : Longman Groups.

Tiwari, B.N. (1980). Adult Education and Libraries. Allahabad: Vohra Publishers and Distributors.



( iv) HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION
Total Marks : 40

External Theory : 32

Internal Evaluation : 04

Internal Practical : 04


Objectives:

  • To enable the student teachers to develop an understanding of the importance, meaning, concept, aims and objectives of Health and Physical Education.

  • To enlighten the student teachers about infectious diseases and their control.

  • To aware the students teachers about balanced diet.

  • To impart knowledge to use good posters for various purposes and First Aid.


COURSE CONTENT

UNIT-I

(a) Physical Education: Definition, its Aims and Objectives.

(b) Importance of Physical Education Programmes in Schools.

(c) Health : Definition, Concept of Health.

(d) Health Education: Definition, Aims and Objectives.

(e) School Health Programme: Health Services, Health Supervisions and Health Instructions.

(f) Common Health Problems and Preventions: Accidents, Environmental Pollution,

Overpopulation, Alcoholism, Smoking, Drug Abuses.

(g) Diet: Functions of Food, Elements of Balanced diet, Food Habits and Malnutrition.

UNIT-II

(a) Communicable Diseases: Mode of Transmission, Methods of Prevention and Control.

(b) Posture: Importance of Good Posture, Common Postural Defects and Remedial Exercises.

(c) Recreation: Meaning, Significance and Recreational Programmes in Schools.

(d) Layout of the Grounds and Rules and Regulations of the following games: Badminton,

Volleyball and Kho-Kho.

(e) Yoga: Meaning, Need, Importance and Benefits of Yoga asanas.

(f) Athletic meet – Meaning, Need and Importance, How to organize athletic meet at school level.



PRACTICAL REPORTS

Prepare a Project Report on:



  1. Three types of Sports Ground.

  2. Annual Athletic Meet

BOOKS SUGGESTED :

Atwal & Kansal (2003). A Textbook of Health, Physical Education and Sports. Jalandhar: A.P. Publisher.

Bucher, C.A. (1979). Foundations of Physical Education and Sports. St. Louis: C.V. Mosby & Co.

Kamlesh, M.L. and Sangral, M.S. (1986). Methods in Physical Education. Ludhiana: Prakash Brothers.

Kaur, Manjeet (2003). Health and Physical Education. Ludhiana: Tandon Publications.

Kaur, Nirmaljit (2003). Essentials of Physical Education. Ludhiana: Kalyani Publishers.

Malik, Neeru and Malik, Rakesh (2005). Health and Physical Education. Gurusar Sadhar: GBD Publications.

Sandhu, S.S. (2008). Health and Physical Education. Ludhiana: Chetna Parkashan.

Singh, Ajmer. (2003). Essentials of Physical Education. Ludhiana: Kalyani publishers.

Singh, Ajmer; Gill, Jagtar Singh; Brar, Racchpal Singh; Bains, Jagdish; Rathee, Sonia Kanwar; Gill, Manmeet Kaur and Brar, R.S. Teaching Methodology and Educational Technology in Physical Education. Ludhiana: Kalyani Publishers.

Syedentop, Daryl (1994). Introduction to physical education, fitness and sports (2nd ed.). London: Mayfield publishing company.

Uppal, A.K. & Gautam, G. P. (2004). Physical Education and Health. Delhi: Friends publisher.


(v) EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS
Total Marks : 40

External Theory : 32

Internal Evaluation : 04

Internal Practical : 04


Objectives :

  • To acquaint the student teachers with the concept of exceptionality and exceptional children.

  • To equip the students with latest trends in the education of exceptional children.

  • To develop an awareness and skill in identifying the exceptional children.

  • To understand the special needs and problems of exceptional children.

  • To inculcate healthy attitude towards exceptional children.

  • To impart practical knowledge and experience about the functioning of special schools.

COURSE CONTENTS :

UNIT-I

(a) Concept of Exceptional Children — Meaning, Need and Classification.

(b) Special Needs of Exceptional Children.

(c) Trends in the Education of Exceptional Children viz. Inclusion, Deinstitutionalization,

Mainstreaming, Community Based Rehabilitation, and Individualized Education Programme.

UNIT-II

Identification, Characteristics, Causes and Education of the following Categories of Exceptional Children :

(a) Learning Disabled.

(b) Mentally Retarded Children.

(c) Orthopedically Handicapped Children.

(d) Speech Handicapped Children.


PRACTICAL WORK :

i. A report based on actual visit to school for exceptional children.

ii. Case study of a child with any of the disability mentioned in Unit II.
BOOKS SUGGESTED :

Dash, M. (2000). Education of Exceptional Children. New Delhi: Atlantic Publisher and Distributors.

Mangal, S.K. (2007). Education of Exceptional Children. New Delhi: Printice Hall of India.

Panda, K.C. (2003). Education of Exceptional Children. New Delhi: Vikas Publishing House.

Sahu, Binod Kumar (2002). Education of Exceptional Children. Ludhiana: Kalyani Publishers.

Samuel, A. Kirk. (1997). Educating Exceptional Children. 8th Edition, New York: Houghton.

Sharma, R.A. (2006). Fundamentals of Special Education. Meerut: R. Lall Book Depot.

Singh, Agyajit. Education of Exceptional Children. Patiala: 21st Century Publication.

Singh, Agyajit; Kharab, Pratibha and Arora, Alka. (2008). Vishisht Balkon Kee Shiksha. Patiala: 21st Century Publication.

(vi) Population Education

Total Marks : 40

External Theory : 32

Internal Evaluation : 04

Internal Practical : 04
Objectives:


  • To be aware of population trends in the world

  • To understand that population becomes stable when there is little difference between birth and death rates.

  • To develop among themselves a health, rational and scientific attitude toward the natural phenomena of the birth and death

  • To realize that the solution to the problem lies in the acceptance of small family norms.

  • To develop an attitude that would promote living in peace and harmony along the nature



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