Office Location: 1042 swkt office Phone: 801-422-7139 Email



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PSYCH 320 - RedShelf

Winter 2018

Section 001: 122 MARB on Tuesday, and Thursday from 12:05 pm - 1:20 pm

Instructor/TA Info

Instructor Information

Name: Dee Higley
Office Location
: 1042 SWKT
Office Phone
: 801-422-7139
Email
: james_higley@byu.edu

TA Information

Name: Nathaniel Landis
Email
: nlandis2013@gmail.com

Name: Elizabeth Passey
Email
: elizabethkpassey@gmail.com

Course Information

Description

Psychology 320, Section 001


Winter 2018
Developmental Psychology

General survey of developmental psychology from infancy through middle childhood.



Prerequisites

General Psychology, Psychology 111 or equivalent.



Materials




Item

Price (new)

Price (used)






ICLICKER+ Required
by ICLICKER














REVEL Infants and Children - Online Course Material/direct bill to student account: $76.40 Required








Grading Scale

Grades

Percent

A

92.5%

A-

90%

B+

87.5%

B

82.5%

B-

80%

C+

77.5%

C

72.5%

C-

70%

D+

65%

D

60%

D-

57%

E

0%

Learning Outcomes

1. Theories and research in human development

Students will describe current theories and research in human development from pre-natal development through late childhood, demonstrating an understanding of developmental processes that lead to normative development, including perceptual, cognitive, biological, genetic, and social domains, as well as factors that lead to psychopathology and mental illness.



Measurement: Multiple choice tests, quizzes.

2. Assess and critique a key issue

Students will assess and critique a key issue in a group format presented to the class.



Measurement: Assessment of presentation.

3. Integrate current research studies

Students will assess critical issues in early childhood development, integrating current research studies on topics in developmental psychology.



Measurement: APA style paper.

Specific Learning Outcomes

  1. To learn the developmental psychobiology, genetics, and early experiences that lead to normative brain development and subsequent physical changes, healthy relationships, normative emotional response, and problem solving.

  2. To understand the different forms of developmental research (longitudinal, cross-sectional, and others), and what each type of research can tell us about the relationship between early events and developmental outcomes.

  3. To learn how maturational and developmental changes in the brain lead to new capabilities, cognitive processes, and physical capabilities.

  4. To learn the how genetic and environmental influences interact, leading to individual differences and psychopathological outcomes.

  5. To understand the role of parents, attachment, early temperament, and intelligence, leading to developmental outcomes and to understand the difference between cause and effect relationships and correlational outcomes.

  6. To integrate personal values and belief systems with the material learned in the course and to integrate principles of psychology into our church service and interpretation of the gospel. 

  7. To develop compassion and charity for individual differences.

Grading Policy

Course Requirements and Grading:

There are 1000 total points possible in the course. The point breakdown is as follows: 

1.    Sectional Exams are worth 400 points (4 exams, 100 points each)

2.    Mini Papers are worth 150 points (3 Mini Papers, 50 points each)

3.    Online Quizzes are worth 250 points (12 online quizzes, 25 points each--the lowest two will be dropped, leaving a total of 10 quizzes)

4.    In-Class Preparation/Attendance is worth 100 points (25 class periods; beginning Tuesday, January 16. Each class has a potential of 4 points for attendance and participation.

5.    Final Exam is worth 100 points

Grades are based on the class performance. Typically the grades assigned are curved, and at least 10% of the class will receive an A- or above. All other grades are then based on those highest scores. The College does not allow exceptions to the rule of taking exam at assigned time.



Structure of the learning process – Repetition! Repetition! Repetition!

**Note: Syllabus and schedule subject to change. 



How do we learn?

Structure of the learning process – Repetition! Repetition! Repetition!
Participation Policy

Participation (4 points per class period —100 points)


During each class, a student can earn 4 possible points, based on class participation.


  • The scores for Participation are based on whether you are in class the entire time and participate using your iClicker and engage in the in-class discussions. If you are in class and answer all the questions, you receive all 4 points even if you answer all of the questions incorrectly.



  • Each of your three lowest participation points (or missing days) will be converted to +4 points. Thus, you can miss up to three classes and still receive the full participation points. After missing three days of class, additional absences result in zeros (i.e., you will not receive points).

  • If you miss the end of class, you miss the participation points because you will not be there to assign yourself a grade. There are no make-up participation points, but remember your three lowest or missing scores will be converted to full credit.

Classroom Procedures

Classroom Procedures are based on questions and preparation. Common courtesy dictates that you turn off your cell phone and that you do not surf the web, answer mail, text, play computer games, or social network during class. If you engage in any of the above, you should not give yourself credit for participation on that day.


Teaching Philosophy

  • The structure of the learning process is Repetition! Repetition! Repetition! Students are expected to come to each class having done the readings that will be discussed that day. The readings are then covered in lecture/discussion. Each step of the class builds on past learning with quizzes and exams formulated to precipitate learning via review and rehearsal.

  • A class goal is to for each student to think critically, look outside the cookie cutter answers and see the world differently than in the past.




  • Discussion is a fundamental aspect of each class. It is the basis of critical thinking and continued rehearsal of the material. Students are expected to come to class prepared to participate and contribute. Questions form the basis of the discussion and lectures, leading to critical reevaluation of how knowledge is interpreted and integrated into one's world view.




  • Lectures are oriented around the readings from the text, with more recent research findings and supplemental material. 






  • Lectures typically ask you to integrate the academic material with your own personal beliefs and to critically evaluate the material presented.



  • Course material will be viewed in terms of LDS theology and personal belief. 

Assignments

Assignment Description

Quiz 1 - Chapter 2

Due: Thursday, Jan 18 at 12:05 pm



Class 1 - The first day that iClicker scores are recorded

Due: Thursday, Jan 18 at 3:00 pm



Class 2 - iClicker scores

Due: Tuesday, Jan 23 at 3:00 pm



Class 3 - iClicker scores

Due: Thursday, Jan 25 at 3:00 pm



Quiz 2 - Chapter 3

Due: Tuesday, Jan 30 at 12:05 pm



Class 4 - iClicker scores

Due: Tuesday, Jan 30 at 3:00 pm



Class 5 - iClicker scores

Due: Thursday, Feb 01 at 3:00 pm



Exam 1 Combined

Due: Friday, Feb 02 at 9:00 pm



Exam 1 Essay

Due: Friday, Feb 02 at 9:00 pm



Quiz 3 - Chapter 4

Due: Tuesday, Feb 06 at 12:05 pm



Class 6 - iClicker scores

Due: Tuesday, Feb 06 at 3:00 pm



Exam 1

Due: Wednesday, Feb 07 at 9:00 pm



Class 7 - iClicker scores

Due: Thursday, Feb 08 at 3:00 pm



Quiz 4 - Chapter 5

Due: Tuesday, Feb 13 at 12:05 pm



Class 8 - iClicker scores

Due: Tuesday, Feb 13 at 3:00 pm



Class 9 - iClicker scores

Due: Thursday, Feb 15 at 3:00 pm



Quiz 5 - Chapter 6

Due: Thursday, Feb 22 at 1:35 pm



Class 10 - iClicker scores

Due: Thursday, Feb 22 at 3:00 pm



Class 11 - iClicker scores

Due: Tuesday, Feb 27 at 3:00 pm



Quiz 6 - Chapter 7

Due: Thursday, Mar 01 at 1:35 pm



Class 12 - iClicker scores

Due: Thursday, Mar 01 at 3:00 pm



Class 13 - iClicker scores

Due: Tuesday, Mar 06 at 3:00 pm



Mini Paper 1

Due: Thursday, Mar 08 at 1:35 pm

An electronic copy of your paper should be turned in on Learning Suite and a hard copy of your paper should be turned in at the beginning of class.

Quiz 7 - Chapter 8

Due: Thursday, Mar 08 at 1:35 pm



Class 14 - iClicker scores

Due: Thursday, Mar 08 at 3:00 pm



Exam 2 Combined

Due: Thursday, Mar 08 at 9:00 pm



Exam 2 Essay

Due: Thursday, Mar 08 at 9:00 pm



Exam 2

Due: Monday, Mar 12 at 6:00 pm



Class 15 - iClicker scores

Due: Tuesday, Mar 13 at 3:00 pm



Quiz 8 - Chapter 9

Due: Thursday, Mar 15 at 1:35 pm



Class 16 - iClicker scores

Due: Thursday, Mar 15 at 3:00 pm



Class 17 - iClicker scores

Due: Tuesday, Mar 20 at 3:00 pm



Quiz 9 - Chapter 10

Due: Thursday, Mar 22 at 1:35 pm



Class 18 - iClicker scores

Due: Thursday, Mar 22 at 3:00 pm



Exam 3 Essay

Due: Saturday, Mar 24 at 3:00 pm

Exam 3 essay. Worth 15 points. Essay to be administered at the Testing Center with the Multiple Choice portion.

Exam 3 Combined

Due: Saturday, Mar 24 at 3:00 pm

Sum of the essay portion and the multiple choice portions of the exam.

Class 19 - iClicker scores

Due: Tuesday, Mar 27 at 3:00 pm



Mini Paper 2

Due: Thursday, Mar 29 at 1:35 pm



Class 20 - iClicker scores

Due: Thursday, Mar 29 at 3:00 pm



Exam 3

Due: Monday, Apr 02 at 6:00 pm

Exam 3 for psychology 320. 60 Multiple choice questions. Worth 85 points (1.2 points per question). There is an essay included that can be written on the back of the Scantron answer sheet.

Quiz 10 - ADHD Quiz

Due: Tuesday, Apr 03 at 1:35 pm

Take this quiz AFTER you complete the 35 Myths About ADHD reading found under the Content tab.

Class 21 - iClicker scores

Due: Tuesday, Apr 03 at 3:00 pm



Quiz 11 - Chapter 12

Due: Thursday, Apr 05 at 1:35 pm



Class 22 - iClicker scores

Due: Thursday, Apr 05 at 3:00 pm



Class 23 - iClicker scores

Due: Tuesday, Apr 10 at 3:00 pm



Quiz 12 - Chapter 13

Due: Thursday, Apr 12 at 1:35 pm



Mini Paper 3

Due: Thursday, Apr 12 at 1:35 pm



Class 24 - iClicker scores

Due: Thursday, Apr 12 at 3:00 pm



Class 25 - iClicker scores

Due: Tuesday, Apr 17 at 3:00 pm



Class Evaluation

Due: Tuesday, Apr 17 at 11:59 pm



iClicker Freebie 2

Due: Tuesday, Apr 17 at 11:59 pm



iClicker Freebie 3

Due: Tuesday, Apr 17 at 11:59 pm



iClicker Freebie 1

Due: Tuesday, Apr 17 at 11:59 pm



Exam 4/Final

Due: Wednesday, Apr 18 at 1:00 pm



Questions 1-60 cover material from Chapters 11, 12 & 13. Questions 61-120 are comprehensive from the first 3 exams. 

Schedule

Date

Lecture

Assignments

T Jan 09 Tuesday

Overview and introduction to the course




Th Jan 11 Thursday

History, Theory, & Research Strategies

Chapter 1

M Jan 15 Monday

Martin Luther King Jr Day




T Jan 16 Tuesday

History, Theory, & Research Strategies

Chapter 1-Continued

Th Jan 18 Thursday

Genetic & Environmental Foundations

Chapter 2

Quiz 1: Chapter 2, due prior to the start of class

T Jan 23 Tuesday

Genetic & Environmental Foundations

Epigenetic readings and the first part of the Carleson reading (p. 331-332)

Th Jan 25 Thursday

Genetic & Environmental Foundations

Chapter 2-Continued

T Jan 30 Tuesday

Prenatal Development

Chapter 3

Quiz 2: Chapter 3, due prior to the start of class

Th Feb 01 Thursday

Prenatal Development

Chapter 3-Continued

Exam 1: Chapters 1, 2, & 3

Exam 1 will be administered in the Testing Center and will open at 1:30pm on Thursday, February 1st and will be available through Wednesday, February 7th when the Testing Center closes. A $5.00 late fee will be required for all tests taken on Wednesday, February 7th. 

T Feb 06 Tuesday

Birth & The Newborn Baby

My Virtual Child assignment explained

Chapter 4

Quiz 3: Chapter 4, due prior to the start of class

Th Feb 08 Thursday

Birth & The Newborn Baby

Chapter 4-Continued

T Feb 13 Tuesday

Physical Development & Learning

Chapter 5

 

Quiz 4: Chapter 5, due prior to the start of class



Th Feb 15 Thursday

Physical Development and Learning

Chapter 5-Continued

M Feb 19 Monday

Presidents Day




T Feb 20 Tuesday

Monday Instruction




Th Feb 22 Thursday

Cognitive Development – Infancy, Toddlerhood

Mini Paper 1 Prompt Distributed 

**FHSS Writing Center TA Visit**



Chapter 6

Quiz 5: Chapter 6, due prior to the start of class

T Feb 27 Tuesday

Cognitive Development – Infancy, Toddlerhood

Chapter 6-Continued

Th Mar 01 Thursday

Emotional & Social Devel – Infancy, Toddlerhood

Chapter 7

Quiz 6: Chapter 7, due prior to the start of class

T Mar 06 Tuesday

Emotional & Social Devel – Infancy, Toddlerhood

Exam 2: Chapters 4, 5, 6, & 7

Exam 2 will be administered in the Testing Center and will open at 1:30pm on Tuesday, March 6th and will be available through Monday, March 12th when the Testing Center closes. A $5.00 late fee will be required for all tests taken on Monday, March 12th. 

Chapter 7-Continued

Th Mar 08 Thursday

Physical Development-Early Childhood

Chapter 8

Quiz 7: Chapter 8, due prior to the start of class

Mini Paper 1

T Mar 13 Tuesday

Physical Development-Early Childhood

Chapter 8-Continued

Th Mar 15 Thursday

Cognitive Development – Early Childhood

Mini Paper 2 Prompt Distributed

Chapter 9

Quiz 8: Chapter 9, due prior to the start of class

T Mar 20 Tuesday

Cognitive Development – Early Childhood

Chapter 9-Continued

 

Th Mar 22 Thursday

Finish Cognitive Development, Begin Emotional & Social Development - Early Childhood

Chapter 10

Quiz 9: Chapter 10, due prior to the start of class

Complete the Carleson reading (p.332 - End)



T Mar 27 Tuesday

Emotional & Social Development - Early Childhood

Chapter 10-Continued

Exam 3: Chapters 8, 9, & 10

Exam 3 will be administered in the Testing Center and will open at 1:30pm on Tuesday, March 27th and will be available through Monday, April 2nd when the Testing Center closes. A $5.00 late fee will be required for all tests taken on Monday, April 2nd. 

Th Mar 29 Thursday

Early Childhood Demonstrations

Mini Paper 2

T Apr 03 Tuesday

Obesity-ADHD lecture

Mini Paper 3 prompt distributed.

ADHD Reading

Quiz 10: ADHD Quiz--On Learning Suite, due prior to the start of class

Th Apr 05 Thursday

Cognitive Development – Middle Childhood

Chapter 12

Quiz 11: Chapter 12, due prior to the start of class

T Apr 10 Tuesday

Cognitive Development – Middle Childhood

Chapter 12-Continued

Th Apr 12 Thursday

Emotional & Social Development – Middle Childhood

Chapter 13

Quiz 12: Chapter 13, due prior to the start of class

Mini Paper 3

T Apr 17 Tuesday

Emotional & Social Development – Middle Childhood

Last Day of Class

Chapter 13-Continued

Same-Sex Parenting and Children's Outcomes article (found under the Content tab)

Th Apr 19 Thursday

Winter Exam Preparation (04/19/2018 - 04/19/2018)




T Apr 24 Tuesday

Exam 4 & Final Exam:

122 MARB

11:00am - 2:00pm

Exam 4/Final Exam: Chapter 11, 12, & 13

The Final Exam will be administered at the same time as Exam 4. Plan on taking twice as long as usual for this exam. The test will be administered in 122 MARB from 11:00am-2:00pm. University policy does not allow us to give exceptions to taking the exam at that time.

University Policies

Honor Code

In keeping with the principles of the BYU Honor Code, students are expected to be honest in all of their academic work. Academic honesty means, most fundamentally, that any work you present as your own must in fact be your own work and not that of another. Violations of this principle may result in a failing grade in the course and additional disciplinary action by the university. Students are also expected to adhere to the Dress and Grooming Standards. Adherence demonstrates respect for yourself and others and ensures an effective learning and working environment. It is the university's expectation, and every instructor's expectation in class, that each student will abide by all Honor Code standards. Please call the Honor Code Office at 422-2847 if you have questions about those standards.



Academic Honesty

The first injunction of the Honor Code is the call to "be honest." Students come to the university not only to improve their minds, gain knowledge, and develop skills that will assist them in their life's work, but also to build character. "President David O. McKay taught that character is the highest aim of education" (The Aims of a BYU Education, p.6). It is the purpose of the BYU Academic Honesty Policy to assist in fulfilling that aim. BYU students should seek to be totally honest in their dealings with others. They should complete their own work and be evaluated based upon that work. They should avoid academic dishonesty and misconduct in all its forms, including but not limited to plagiarism, fabrication or falsification, cheating, and other academic misconduct.



Plagiarism

Intentional plagiarism is a form of intellectual theft that violates widely recognized principles of academic integrity as well as the Honor Code. Such plagiarism may subject the student to appropriate disciplinary action administered through the university Honor Code Office, in addition to academic sanctions that may be applied by an instructor. Inadvertent plagiarism, which may not be a violation of the Honor Code, is nevertheless a form of intellectual carelessness that is unacceptable in the academic community. Plagiarism of any kind is completely contrary to the established practices of higher education where all members of the university are expected to acknowledge the original intellectual work of others that is included in their own work. In some cases, plagiarism may also involve violations of copyright law. Intentional Plagiarism-Intentional plagiarism is the deliberate act of representing the words, ideas, or data of another as one's own without providing proper attribution to the author through quotation, reference, or footnote. Inadvertent Plagiarism-Inadvertent plagiarism involves the inappropriate, but non-deliberate, use of another's words, ideas, or data without proper attribution. Inadvertent plagiarism usually results from an ignorant failure to follow established rules for documenting sources or from simply not being sufficiently careful in research and writing. Although not a violation of the Honor Code, inadvertent plagiarism is a form of academic misconduct for which an instructor can impose appropriate academic sanctions. Students who are in doubt as to whether they are providing proper attribution have the responsibility to consult with their instructor and obtain guidance. Examples of plagiarism include: Direct Plagiarism-The verbatim copying of an original source without acknowledging the source. Paraphrased Plagiarism-The paraphrasing, without acknowledgement, of ideas from another that the reader might mistake for the author's own. Plagiarism Mosaic-The borrowing of words, ideas, or data from an original source and blending this original material with one's own without acknowledging the source. Insufficient Acknowledgement-The partial or incomplete attribution of words, ideas, or data from an original source. Plagiarism may occur with respect to unpublished as well as published material. Copying another student's work and submitting it as one's own individual work without proper attribution is a serious form of plagiarism.



Respectful Environment

Sexual Misconduct

In accordance with Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Brigham Young University prohibits unlawful sex discrimination against any participant in its education programs or activities. The university also prohibits sexual harassment-including sexual violence-committed by or against students, university employees, and visitors to campus. As outlined in university policy, sexual harassment, dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking are considered forms of "Sexual Misconduct" prohibited by the university.

University policy requires all university employees in a teaching, managerial, or supervisory role to report all incidents of Sexual Misconduct that come to their attention in any way, including but not limited to face-to-face conversations, a written class assignment or paper, class discussion, email, text, or social media post. Incidents of Sexual Misconduct should be reported to the Title IX Coordinator at t9coordinator@byu.edu or (801) 422-8692. Reports may also be submitted through EthicsPoint at https://titleix.byu.edu/report or 1-888-238-1062 (24-hours a day).

BYU offers confidential resources for those affected by Sexual Misconduct, including the university's Victim Advocate, as well as a number of non-confidential resources and services that may be helpful. Additional information about Title IX, the university's Sexual Misconduct Policy, reporting requirements, and resources can be found at http://titleix.byu.edu or by contacting the university's Title IX Coordinator.



Student Disability

Brigham Young University is committed to providing a working and learning atmosphere that reasonably accommodates qualified persons with disabilities. If you have any disability which may impair your ability to complete this course successfully, please contact the University Accessibility Center (UAC), 2170 WSC or 422-2767. Reasonable academic accommodations are reviewed for all students who have qualified, documented disabilities. The UAC can also assess students for learning, attention, and emotional concerns. Services are coordinated with the student and instructor by the UAC. If you need assistance or if you feel you have been unlawfully discriminated against on the basis of disability, you may seek resolution through established grievance policy and procedures by contacting the Equal Employment Office at 422-5895, D-285 ASB.



Mental Health Concerns

Mental health concerns and stressful life events can affect students’ academic performance and quality of life. BYU Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS, 1500 WSC, 801-422-3035, caps.byu.edu) provides individual, couples, and group counseling, as well as stress management services. These services are confidential and are provided by the university at no cost for full-time students. For general information please visit https://caps.byu.edu; for more immediate concerns please visit http://help.byu.edu.



"Sadly, from time to time, we do hear reports of those who are at best insensitive and at worst insulting in their comments to and about others... We hear derogatory and sometimes even defamatory comments about those with different political, athletic, or ethnic views or experiences. Such behavior is completely out of place at BYU, and I enlist the aid of all to monitor carefully and, if necessary, correct any such that might occur here, however inadvertent or unintentional. "I worry particularly about demeaning comments made about the career or major choices of women or men either directly or about members of the BYU community generally. We must remember that personal agency is a fundamental principle and that none of us has the right or option to criticize the lawful choices of another." President Cecil O. Samuelson, Annual University Conference, August 24, 2010 "Occasionally, we ... hear reports that our female faculty feel disrespected, especially by students, for choosing to work at BYU, even though each one has been approved by the BYU Board of Trustees. Brothers and sisters, these things ought not to be. Not here. Not at a university that shares a constitution with the School of the Prophets." Vice President John S. Tanner, Annual University Conference, August 24, 2010

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