Northwest native americans level 4 Highline School District Project G. L. A. D. Idea pages



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NORTHWEST NATIVE AMERICANS Level 4

Highline School District - Project G.L.A.D.

IDEA PAGES

  1. UNIT THEME


Students will learn about the culture of the Northwest Native Americans prior to the first explorers and how their lives were impacted as a result of the United States government and the westward movement.


  1. FOCUS/MOTIVATION

  • Anthropologist Awards

  • Teacher made big book – Coastal Indians

  • Cognitive Content dictionary with Signal Word

  • Read Alouds

  • Observation Charts

  • Inquiry Chart

  • Realia – Native American Kits from HSD

  • Poetry/Songs/Chants

  • Video Clips




  1. CLOSURE

  • Process all charts and learnings.

  • Poetry/Chants

  • Role Play Situations

  • Personal exploration – free choice writing

  • Potlatch/Pow Wow

  • Evaluation of week – letter home to parents

  • Review of home school connections




  1. STANDARDS – Washington State


HISTORY/SOCIAL STUDIES-GRADE 4

      1. Understands that governments are organized into local, state, tribal, and national levels.

      1. Understands and analyzes the costs and benefits of people’s decisions to move and relocate to meet their needs and wants

3.1.1 Constructs maps to show information about people and places in Washington State.

3.2.2 Understands the cultural universals of food, clothing, shelter, and transportation.

3.2.3 Understands that the geographic features of Washington State have influenced the movement of people.

4.1.1 Understands and creates timelines to show how historical events are organized into time periods and eras.



4.1.2 Understands how the following themes and developments help to define eras in Washington State history from time immemorial to 1889:

    • Growth of northwest coastal and plateau tribes prior to treaties (Time Immemorial to 1854)

    • Maritime and overland exploration, encounter, and trade (1774-1849)

    • Immigration and settlement (1811-1889)

    • Territory and treaty-making (1854-1889)

IDEA PAGES 2


      1. Analyzes how people from various cultural groups have shaped the history of Washington State.

      1. Understands that there are multiple perspectives regarding the interpretation of historical events and creates an historical account using multiple sources.

      2. Analyzes the multiple causes of change and conflict in Washington State history.

      1. Understands that significant historical events in Washington State have implications for current decisions.

      1. Evaluates the accuracy of one’s understanding of concepts used in documents and sources from Washington State.

      1. Revises a research question to refine research on social studies issues and historical events.

      2. Understands the main ideas from an artifact, primary source, or secondary source in order to gather accurate information on an issue or historical event.

      1. Draws clear, well-reasoned conclusions and provides explanations that are supported by artifacts and/or primary sources in a paper or presentation.


Reading—Grade 4
In fourth grade, students read skillfully with meaning and purpose using appropriate comprehension and vocabulary strategies. Students read, discuss, reflect, and respond, using evidence from text, to a wide variety of literary genres and informational text. Students read for pleasure and continue to choose books based on personal preference, topic, theme, or author.
EALR 1: The student understands and uses different skills and strategies to read.


Component 1.1 Use word recognition skills and strategies to read and comprehend text.


1.1.4 Apply understanding of phonics.

  • Use multi-syllabic decoding when reading words in all texts.




Component 1.2 Use vocabulary (word meaning) strategies to comprehend text.


1.2.1 Apply reference skills to define, clarify, and refine word meanings.

  • Use dictionaries, thesauruses, and glossaries to find or confirm word meanings, pronunciations, syllabication, synonyms, antonyms, and parts of speech of words.


1.2.2 Apply vocabulary strategies in grade-level text.

  • Use word origins to determine the meaning of unknown words.

  • Use the meanings of prefixes, suffixes, and abbreviated words to determine the meaning of unknown words in grade-level text.

  • Explain how to derive word meaning from knowledge of affixes and roots (e.g., port: transportation, porter, import, report).

  • Use prior knowledge, the text, context clues, and graphic features of text to predict, clarify, and/or expand word meanings and concepts.


Component 1.3 Build vocabulary through wide reading.

1.3.1 Understand and apply new vocabulary.

  • Use new vocabulary from informational/expository text and literary/narrative text, including text from a variety of cultures and communities, in oral and written communication.


1.3.2 Understand and apply content/academic vocabulary critical to the meaning of the text. W

  • Define words and concepts necessary for understanding math, science, social studies, literature, and other content area text.

  • Explain that some words have a different meaning in different content areas (e.g., concept of shade in science and art).

  • Select, from multiple choices, the meaning of words necessary to understand.

  • Use new vocabulary in oral and written communication and content/academic text.

IDEA PAGES 3
Component 1.4 Apply word recognition skills and strategies to read fluently.
1.4.2 Apply fluency to enhance comprehension.

  • Read aloud grade-level informational/expository text and literary/narrative text accurately, using appropriate pacing, phrasing, and expression.

  • Read aloud unpracticed grade-level text at a fluency rate of 115–125 words correct per minute.


1.4.3 Apply different reading rates to match text.

  • Adjust reading rate to match difficulty and type of text and the purposes for reading (e.g., skimming for facts, scanning for key words, and close/careful reading for understanding new or complex ideas).


EALR 2: The student understands the meaning of what is read.

Component 2.1 Demonstrate evidence of reading comprehension.
2.1.3 Apply comprehension monitoring strategies during and after reading: determine importance using theme, main ideas, and supporting details in grade-level informational/expository text and/or literary/narrative text. W

  • State the main idea of an informational/expository text passage and provide three or more text-based details that support it.

  • State the main idea of a literary/narrative text passage and support with three details from the story.

  • Select, from multiple choices, the main/major idea of a passage, poem, or selection.

  • State the theme/message in culturally relevant literary/narrative text and support with text-based evidence.

  • Organize main ideas and supporting details in a teacher-selected graphic organizer to enhance comprehension of text.


2.1.4 Apply comprehension monitoring strategies before, during, and after reading: use prior knowledge/schema.

  • Explain connections between self and characters, events, and information occurring within a text or among multiple texts.

  • Activate prior knowledge about a topic and organize information into a graphic organizer to aid in comprehension of text


2.1.5 Apply comprehension monitoring strategies before, during, and after reading: predict and infer from grade-level informational/expository text and/or literary/narrative text. W

  • Predict text content using prior knowledge and text features.

  • Use text and prior knowledge to make, confirm, or revise inferences and predictions.

  • Select, from multiple choices, a prediction, or inference from literary/narrative text (e.g., how a poet or author feels, how a character feels, what a character will do, what is likely to happen next or at the end of the story or poem).

  • Select, from multiple choices, a prediction or inference from informational/expository text (e.g., what is likely to happen, or what will happen next).

  • Organize information that supports a prediction or inference in a graphic organizer to enhance comprehension of text.


2.1.6 Apply comprehension monitoring strategies before, during, and after reading: monitor for meaning, create mental images, and generate and answer questions in grade-level informational/expository text and/or literary/narrative text.

  • Monitor for meaning by identifying where and why comprehension was lost and use comprehension-repair strategies to regain meaning.

  • Generate and answer questions before, during, and after reading.

  • Draw, write about, or verbally describe the mental imagery that occurs while reading.

  • Organize information to monitor for meaning; generate and answer questions in a teacher-selected graphic organizer to enhance comprehension.


2.1.7 Apply comprehension strategies during and after reading: summarize grade-level informational/expository text and literary/narrative text. W

  • Summarize the events, information, or ideas in an informational/expository text (e.g., causes of an event like a war or a tornado, steps in building a snow cave).

  • Summarize culturally relevant literary/narrative text.

  • Select, from multiple choices, a sentence that best summarizes the story or informational selection.

  • Organize summary information in a teacher-selected graphic organizer to enhance comprehension.

IDEA PAGES 4
Component 2.2 Understand and apply knowledge of text components to comprehend text.

2.2.1 Understand sequence in informational/expository text and literary/narrative text. W

  • Explain ideas or events in sequential order. (Note: Differences in story telling order exist between cultures. For example, in some cultures the end of the story is told first.)

  • Recognize and explain literary/narrative text written out of sequence (e.g., flashbacks, tales from other cultures).

  • Explain steps in a process (e.g., problem solving in mathematics, life cycle of a salmon).

  • Select, from multiple choices, the order of ideas, facts or events (e.g., what happened first, next, last; the order in which ideas or facts were introduced).


2.2.2 Apply features of printed and electronic text to locate and comprehend text. W

  • Identify and use grade-level appropriate text features.

  • Explain how certain text features help you understand the selection.

  • Interpret information from graphic features.

  • Identify, from multiple choices, where certain information/ideas might be found in the text.

  • Use icons, pull-down menus, key word searches on an electronic device.


2.2.3 Understand and analyze story elements. W

  • Use knowledge of situation and characters’ actions, motivations, feelings, and physical attributes to determine characters’ traits.

  • Identify the main events in a plot, including the cause and effect relationship in problem solving.

  • Describe the components of setting and explain how and why setting is important to the story.

  • Differentiate between first and third person point of view in a selection and explain the difference.

  • Select, from multiple choices, the best description of a character or setting in a story or poem (e.g., character traits, feelings, character’s problem, or importance of character).


2.2.4 Apply understanding of text organizational structures.

  • Recognize and use previously learned text organizational structures (simple listing, sequential order, description, compare and contrast) to aid comprehension.

  • Identify and use text written in the text organizational structure of chronological order to find and organize information and comprehend text.


Component 2.3 Expand comprehension by analyzing, interpreting, and synthesizing information and ideas in literary and informational text.

2.3.1 Understand and analyze the relationship between and among informational/expository text and literary/narrative text. W

  • Compare and contrast plots, characters, and settings in multiple texts.

  • Compare and contrast information (e.g., similar topics written in different genres such as a short story and a poem or magazine article and encyclopedia).

  • Select, from multiple choices, a sentence that describes how specific literary/narrative elements are alike or different in a poem or story (e.g., two characters and/or their feelings, a character and the author, two events, two selections).

  • Select, from multiple choices, a sentence that describes how information is alike or different (e.g., information from two selections).

  • Recognize and explain cause and effect relationships in informational/expository text and literary/narrative text, using evidence from the text.

  • Select, from multiple choices, a sentence that explains the cause of events or the effects of actions.


2.3.2 Apply understanding of systems for organizing information and analyze appropriate sources.

  • Use multiple organizational systems to locate information from reference and content area materials.

  • Select appropriate resources for locating information (e.g., thesaurus, website, directory) on a specific topic or for a specific purpose.


2.3.3 Understand literary/narrative devices. W

  • Explain the meaning of simile, personification, metaphor, idiom, and humor in literary/narrative passages.

IDEA PAGES 2
Component 2.4 Think critically and analyze author’s use of language, style, purpose, and perspective in literary and informational text.

2.4.1 Apply the skills of drawing conclusions, providing a response, and expressing insights to informational/expository text and literary/narrative text. W

  • Give a personal response that demonstrates insight about text, using a teacher-generated prompt (e.g., what would be the best/worst part of an event or situation).

  • Draw conclusions from text, citing text-based information to support the conclusion (e.g., how the story or information might be useful; to whom a story or information might be useful).


2.4.2 Analyze the author’s purpose for and style of writing in both informational/expository text and literary/narrative text. W

  • Determine the author’s purpose and support decision with evidence/details from text.

  • Identify and explain how the author’s use of word choice, sentence structure and length, and/or literary/narrative devices affects the reader, using a variety of texts.


2.4.3 Understand the difference between fact and opinion. W

  • Identify facts and opinions; provide evidence from the text to support your answer.

  • Select, from multiple choices, a statement that is a fact or an opinion.


2.4.4 Evaluate author’s effectiveness for a chosen audience. W

  • Read an article and decide if a chosen audience (e.g., teachers, parents, classmates) would agree or disagree with what the author says.


2.4.5 Understand how to generalize from text. W

  • Generalize about a topic after reading more than one text (e.g., make generalizations about life on the prairie after reading several informational/expository and literary/narrative accounts of the migration west).

  • Generalize about characters and characteristics in similar stories from different cultures (e.g., the “trickster” type tales such as Coyote in Native American literature; animals in African folk tales like Ananzi (the spider); and Br’er Rabbit stories of the Deep South).


EALR 3: The student reads different materials for a variety of purposes.

Component 3.1 Read to learn new information.

3.1.1 Understand how to select and use appropriate resources.

  • Collect and use information from a variety of resources to solve a problem or answer a question.


Component 3.2 Read to perform a task.

3.2.1 Understand information gained from reading to perform a specific task.

  • Interpret information from common environmental print to solve a problem or perform a task (e.g., use a catalog to choose items within a budget).


3.2.2 Understand a variety of functional documents.

  • Explain the information in functional documents related to hobbies or interests (e.g., skate boarding magazines, books about animals, e-mail, and letters from friends).


Component 3.4 Read for literary experience in a variety of genres.

3.4.2 Understand contemporary and traditional literature written in a variety of genres.

  • Explain the characteristics of a variety of genres.

  • Respond to literature from a variety of genres using teacher or self-generated prompts appropriate to the text and content.

IDEA PAGES 6


3.4.3 Analyze a variety of literature representing different cultures and traditions.

  • Compare and contrast cultures and traditions from a variety of literature.

  • Generalize about traditions after reading literature from various cultures (e.g., customs, ceremonies, celebrations).


EALR 4: The student sets goals and evaluates progress to improve reading.

Component 4.1 Assess reading strengths and need for improvement.

4.1.1 Apply strategies to monitor reading progress.

  • Identify reading strengths and weaknesses and select targets on which to work.

  • Track progress in reading achievement with graphs, charts, and checklists.


4.1.2 Apply strategies for setting grade-level appropriate reading goals.

  • Set reading goals, create a plan to meet those goals, and monitor progress toward implementing the plan with teacher assistance.


Component 4.2 Develop interests and share reading experiences.
4.2.1 Evaluate authors, books, and genres to select favorites.

  • Discuss and share favorite authors, books, and genres with others. Explain reason for choices.

WASHINGTON STATE ELD STANDARDS LISTENING AND SPEAKING



EALR 1: The student uses listening and observation skills to gain understanding.

Component 1.1 – The student will focus attention.




Notes about 1.1 – Focus attention - Physical behaviors may look different from culture to culture. Focus for the teacher should be on student’s recall and comprehension of information.

Component 1.2 – The student will listen and observe to gain and interpret information.



Proficiency

Level

GLE

3-5

Beginning

(EALR 1


Comp. 1.2)

1.2

  • Use physical actions and/or words to respond to simple directions and questions.

Advanced Beginning

1.2
1.2

  • Respond to directions and questions.




  • Use phrases to identify main points of simple conversations and stories.

Intermediate



1.2


  • Respond to directions, questions, and some idiomatic expressions.

  • Use simple sentences to retell or state main point and details of conversations and stories.

  • Recognize inappropriate use of register.

  • Recognize that words may have different meanings in different contexts.

Advanced


1.2


  • Respond to multi-step directions and to questions.

  • Use descriptive sentences to retell stories in detail including characters, setting, and plot.

  • Independently recognize inappropriate use of register.

  • Use context to determine appropriate meaning of multiple meaning words.

Transitional

1.2

  • Respond to multi-step directions and to questions.

  • Use descriptive sentences to retell or state main point and supporting details of conversations, oral presentations and familiar literature and subject area content.

  • Recognize inappropriate use of register and suggest alternatives.

  • Use context to determine appropriate meaning of multiple meaning words.

Component 1.3 – The student will check for understanding by asking questions and paraphrasing.



Proficiency

Levels

GLE

3-5

Beginning

(EALR 1


Comp. 1.3)

1.3



  • Use classroom norms to signal to ask a question.

  • Use single word/gestures to ask for repetition in order to clarify.

Advanced Beginning

1.3


  • Use words and/or phrases, intonation to ask simple questions.

  • Use words/phrases in a frame to paraphrase.

Intermediate

1.3


  • Use simple forms* to ask questions about content.

  • Use simple sentences to paraphrase.

Advanced

1.3


  • Use simple forms* to probe for details about content.

  • Use descriptive sentences with some content vocabulary to paraphrase.

Transitional

1.3

1.3


  • Use more extensive supporting details and content area vocabulary to ask questions in a variety of contexts and situations.

  • Use descriptive sentences with content vocabulary to paraphrase.

*Simple forms are defined as Who, What, Where, When questions as well as subject/verb inversions e.g. “Is the dog big?” which would elicit Yes/No answer




EALR 2: The student communicates ideas clearly and effectively.

Component 2.1 – The student will communicate clearly to a range of audiences for different purposes.




Proficiency

Level

GLE

3-5

Beginning

(EALR 2


Comp. 2.1)


2.1



  • Use words to participate in social conversations using informal language.

  • Use, through repetition, common social greetings, simple repetitive phrases, and state basic needs using informal language.

  • Use gestures and/or words to participate in group discussion or activity which involve concrete objects.

  • Use words to tell a story from a familiar picture book.

  • Use gestures and/or words to role-play an action or event.

  • Repeat words which are part of the frozen register (i.e. Pledge of Allegiance).




Advanced Beginning


2.1



  • Use phrases and/or simple sentences to participate in social conversations with peers using informal language.

  • Independently use common social greetings, simple repetitive phrases, and state basic needs using informal language.

  • Use words and/or phrases to role-play an action or event.

  • Use words and/or phrases to tell a familiar story, or recount scenes from a film, video or drama.

  • Use words and/or phrases to inform, and entertain.

  • Use words and/or phrases to participate in group discussion or activity which involves concrete objects.

  • Repeat phrases which are part of the frozen register (i.e. Pledge of Allegiance, poems, favorite stories).




Intermediate


2.1



  • Use simple sentences to participate in social conversations on familiar topic with peers and adults.

  • Use simple sentences to tell a story, inform, explain and entertain.

  • Begin to use appropriate language registers for speaking to different audiences with teacher support.

  • Give instructions for a familiar process; process may be out of sequence and/or steps may be skipped.

  • Repeat sentences which are part of the frozen register (i.e. Pledge of Allegiance, poems, favorite stories).

Advanced

(EALR 2


Comp. 2.1)

2.1



  • Use descriptive sentences to participate in social conversations with peers and adults.

  • Use descriptive sentences to tell a story, inform, explain, entertain, and persuade.

  • Begin to use appropriate language registers, with occasional lapses.

  • Give instructions for a familiar process in an understandable manner.

  • Use appropriate body language and eye contact when delivering oral presentations, with occasional lapses.

  • Independently recite language used in frozen register i.e. Pledge of Allegiance, poems, favorite stories).




Transitional


2.1



  • Independently participate in social conversations with peers and adults.

  • Apply communication skills to narrate, inform, explain, entertain, and persuade in a variety of contexts.

  • Use different language registers in situations as appropriate.

  • Give instructions in a precise and understandable manner.

  • Use appropriate body language and eye contact when delivering oral presentations.



EALR 2: The student communicates ideas clearly and effectively.

Component 2.2 – The student will develop content and ideas. Develop a topic or theme; organize thoughts around a clear beginning, middle, and end; use transitional sentences and phrases to connect related ideas; and speak coherently and compellingly.



Proficiency

Level

GLE

3-5

Beginning

(EALR 2


Comp. 2.2)








Advanced Beginning

2.2
2.2

  • Connect words and phases using the conjunction and.

  • Begin to sequence words and/or phrases related to familiar topic using a picture prompt.




Intermediate

2.2



  • Connect sentences using the words and, and then, after and but.

  • Organize a simple oral presentation in a logical order with a clear beginning, middle and end, with teacher support.

  • Select and narrow a topic from a teacher-provided list, with teacher support.

  • Choose examples to support ideas from list, with teacher support.

Advanced



2.2



  • Connect sentences using the words and, and then, after, if and but.

  • Organize an oral presentation in a logical order, ie. beginning, middle and end, with minimal teacher support.

  • Select and narrow a topic from a teacher-provided list, with minimal teacher support.

  • Use examples and details to support ideas with teacher support.




Transitional


2.2



  • Connect sentences using the words and, and then, after, if and but to sustain a topic.

  • Organize an oral presentation in a logical order, ie. beginning, middle and end.

  • Select and narrow a topic from a teacher-provided list

  • Use examples and descriptive details to support ideas.





EALR 2: The student communicates ideas clearly and effectively.

Component 2.3 – The student will use effective delivery. Adjust speaking strategies for a variety of audiences and purposes by varying intonation, pitch, and pace of speech to create effect and aid communication.

Component 2.4 – The student will use effective language and style. Use language that is grammatically correct, precise, engaging and well-suited to topic, audience, and purpose.

Proficiency Level

GLE

Grades 3-5

Beginning

(EALR 2


Comp. 2.3, 2.4)

2.3

2.4


  • Use gestures and/or words to participate in group discussion or activity.

  • Use gestures and/or words to communicate needs and role-play an action or event.

Advanced Beginning

2.3

2.4


  • Use words and/or phrases to participate in group discussion or activity while beginning to use appropriate eye contact and volume.

  • Use words and/or phrases to tell a story, inform, and entertain.

Intermediate


2.3

2.3


2.4

  • Distinguish between appropriate ways of speaking to different audiences (register).

  • Use simple sentences to share information with class, using appropriate volume.

  • Use simple sentences with inconsistent use of syntax, tense, plurals, and subject/verb agreement.




Advanced



2.3

2.3


2.4


  • Use appropriate ways of speaking that vary based on audience and subject matter.

  • Use descriptive sentences to share information with class, while beginning to use appropriate volume, intonation, and expression.

  • Use descriptive sentences with common grammatical forms, with some errors.

Transitional


2.3

2.3


2.4

  • Use appropriate ways of speaking that vary based on audience and subject matter.

  • Make oral presentation to class, using appropriate volume, intonation, eye contact, and expression.

  • Speak clearly and comprehensibly using academic English with occasional errors.





Communication is a cultural process. In order to work together effectively and be culturally responsive, teachers and students in all classrooms need to be able to:


  • Recognize and adjust behavior appropriately to nonverbal communication

  • Recognize body language norms among various cultures represented in the classroom

  • Determine the culturally appropriate distance to maintain while communicating with someone

  • Recognize and appropriately use formal and informal gestures and body language

  • Identify nonverbal cues that cause misunderstanding



EALR 3: The student uses communication strategies and skills to work effectively with others.

Component 3.1 – The student will use language to interact effectively and responsibly with others.

Component 3.2 – The student will work cooperatively as a member of a group.

Component 3.3 – The student will seek agreement and solutions through discussion.




Proficiency Level

GLE

3-5

Beginning

(EALR 3


Comp. 3.1, 3.2, 3.3)

3.1

3.2


3.3

  • Independently use common social greetings, simple repetitive phrases, and state basic needs

  • Use words or gestures to contribute to group discussions, including personal experiences.




Advanced Beginning


3.1

3.1


3.2

3.3




  • Use words and/or phrases to actively participate in social and academic conversations on familiar topics.

  • Demonstrate turn-taking in a conversation and a group discussion.

  • Use words and/or phrases to contribute to group discussions, including personal experiences.

  • Use words and/or phrases to suggest a solution to a problem.




Intermediate

3.1

3.1


3.2

  • Use simple sentences to actively participate in social and academic conversations on familiar topics.

  • Demonstrate turn-taking in a conversation and a group discussion, responding appropriately to nonverbal cues.

  • Use simple sentences to explain ideas clearly in group discussions, including personal experiences.







3.2

3.3


  • Begin to use established group rules and assume various assigned roles to further progress of group.

  • Use simple sentences to brainstorm solutions to problems




Advanced


3.1

3.1


3.2

3.2


3.2

3.3


  • Initiate and actively participate in social and academic conversations on unfamiliar topics.

  • Demonstrate turn-taking in a conversation and a group discussion, responding appropriately to nonverbal cues.

  • Use descriptive sentences to explain ideas clearly in group discussions, helping group move toward consensus.

  • Use descriptive sentences to offer personal opinion based on what has already been said.

  • Articulate and use established group rules and assume various assigned roles to further progress of a group.

  • Use descriptive sentences to contribute and prioritize possible solutions to a problem.




Transitional


3.1

3.2


3.2

3.2




  • Respond actively and appropriately both in group work and in informal interactions.

  • Explain ideas clearly in group discussions and elaborate on the contributions of other group members.

  • Contribute to group with examples and suggestions and assume various assigned roles to further the progress of the group.

  • Contribute and prioritize multiple solutions to problems.





EALR 4: The student analyzes and evaluates the effectiveness of formal and informal communication.

Component 4.1 – The student will assess strengths and needs for improvement. Assess own and others’ communication strengths and needs and set goals for improvement.

Component 4.2 – The student will seek and offer feedback. Seek and use feedback to improve communication; offer suggestions and comments to others.



Proficiency Level

GLE

3-5

Beginning

(EALR 4,


Comp. 4.1, 4.2)

4.1

4.2


  • Attend to speakers in informal conversations and formal presentations.

Advanced Beginning

4.1

4.2


  • Use words and phrases to respond to speakers in informal conversations and formal presentations.

Intermediate

4.1

4.2



  • Use simple sentences to offer feedback in response to speakers in conversations and formal presentations.

Advanced

4.1

4.2


4.2


  • Use a rubric of effective traits to evaluate and to improve one’s own presentations and conversations.

  • Use a rubric to offer specific feedback on presentations with regard to delivery skills, conventions and cultural norms.

  • Seek, accept and apply feedback about presentations.

Transitional


4.1

4.2


4.2

  • Use criteria to evaluate and improve one’s own and others’ presentations.

  • Seek, accept and apply feedback.

  • Use a rubric to offer specific feedback on presentations with regard to delivery skills, word choice and grammar.





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