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History

2017 Subject Outline

Year 10


NORTHERN TERRITORY BOARD OF STUDIES


Endorsement

This subject outline was endorsed by the Northern Territory Board of Studies (NTBOS__Year_10__NTCET__Year_11_–_Stage_1__NTCET'>NTBOS) in August 2016.



Acknowledgement

Thank you to the teachers participating in the working group who consulted over an extended period of time to create this curriculum document.



This version of the Subject Outline is approved for teaching at Year 10 from 2017.



Content

Year 10 1

Learning area -Humanities and Social Sciences 4

History and senior secondary pathways 4

Background 5

Purpose 5

GENERAL Capabilities 5

Overview 7

Course Structure 8

Year 10 content descriptions 9

Year 10 achievement standard 12

Assessment scope and requirements 12

Evidence of learning 13

Assessment design criteria 13

School assessment 15

Sources Analysis 15

Support materials 20

Advice on ethical study and research 20

Glossary, student work samples and teacher resources 20

References 20


Year 10 1

Introduction 5

Learning area 5

Year 10 History 5

History and senior secondary pathways 5

Length 7

Background 7

Purpose 7

Capabilities 9

Learning scope and requirements 12

Overview 12

Course Structure 12

Year 10 content descriptions 14

Year 10 achievement standard 18

Assessment scope and requirements 20

Evidence of learning 20

Assessment design criteria 20

School assessment 22

Sources Analysis 22

Alternative Task 24

Performance standards 26

Support materials 28

Advice on ethical study and research 28

Glossary, student work samples and teacher resources 28

References 28

Introduction

Learning area -Humanities and Social Sciences

Year 10 History
LENGTH 50 hours per year
The Year 10 curriculum provides a study of the history of the modern world and Australia from 1918 to the present, with an emphasis on Australia in its global context. The twentieth century became a critical period in Australia’s social, cultural, economic and political development. The transformation of the modern world during a time of political turmoil, global conflict and international cooperation provides a necessary context for understanding Australia’s development, its place within the Asia-Pacific region and its global standing.
The content provides opportunities to develop historical understanding through key concepts, including evidence, continuity and change, cause and effect, perspectives, empathy, significance and contestability. These concepts may be investigated within a particular historical context to facilitate an understanding of the past and to provide a focus for historical inquiries.
The history content at this year level involves two strands: historical knowledge and understanding, and historical skills. These strands are interrelated and have been developed to be taught in an integrated way, and in ways that are appropriate to specific local contexts. The order and detail in which they are taught are programming decisions.

History and senior secondary pathways

Students will undertake a course which caters for their learning area development from the Year 10 Australian Curriculum: History. The Year 10 course will provide the background knowledge, skills and understandings to enable students to successfully proceed to appropriate Stage 1 NTCET Humanities and Social Sciences subjects.
Year 10 History to NTCET progression


NTBOS

Year 10

NTCET

Year 11 – Stage 1

NTCET

Year 12 – Stage 2



History

History


Ancient Studies

and


Aboriginal Studies

Australian and International Politics

Economics

Legal Studies

Philosophy

Religion Studies

Society and Culture

Tourism


Women’s Studies

Modern History

Australian History

and

Aboriginal Studies



Australian and International Politics

Classical Studies

Economics

Legal Studies

Philosophy

Religion Studies

Society and Culture

Tourism


Women’s Studies


Background

The Australian Curriculum states that:

Teachers use the Australian Curriculum content and achievement standards first to identify current levels of learning and achievement and then to select the most appropriate content (possibly from across several year levels) to teach individual students and/or groups of students. This takes into account that in each class there may be students with a range of prior achievement (below, at, and above the year level expectations) and that teachers plan to build on current learning”[Aus162].

These principles underpin the design and structure of the Northern Territory Year 10 historical skills strand but the chronological continuum in the knowledge and understanding strand should be maintained.


Students will also be provided with skills and pathways for the successful completion of the Northern Territory Certificate of Education and Training (NTCET) Stage 1 and 2 requirements.

Purpose

This document provides a strategy for aligning the learning requirements of the Australian Curriculum and the assessment requirements of the NTCET. The Australian Curriculum provides the content descriptions and year level achievement standards for Year 10 History. The NTCET, through assessment design criteria and performance standards provides a common standard for student achievement at Stage 1 and 2 and this will inform and shape the language and standards for achievement in Year 10 History [Gov16].
Information for this document has been modified from ACARA, the Australian Curriculum and from the SACE websites.

GENERAL Capabilities

The capabilities connect student learning within and across subjects in a range of contexts. They include essential knowledge and skills that enable people to act in effective and successful ways.
The seven capabilities are:


  • literacy

  • numeracy

  • information and communication technology (ICT) capability

  • critical and creative thinking

  • personal and social capability

  • ethical understanding

  • intercultural understanding.


Literacy

Students extend their literacy skills through accessing historical sources in print, oral, visual, spatial, and electronic forms. Historical sources include letters, speeches, biographies, photographs, films, artefacts, sites, and archived material. Students use their literacy skills to interpret meaning from a variety of documented and living sources, including those who have experienced historical events, and those who study and interpret them. Students analyse and evaluate sources, ideas, perspectives, and interpretations, and draw conclusions. They examine texts for authority, reliability, and relevance, and consider whose stories are told, not told, and why. Students create texts to communicate, explore, discuss, explain, and argue a point of view, selecting and employing appropriate text structures and language to develop reasoned historical arguments, supported by evidence.


Numeracy

Students extend their numeracy skills through the historical inquiry process, by recognising patterns and relationships chronologically and spatially, through the use of scaled timelines and maps. Students may support their views with data, some of which are numerical in nature. They further develop their numeracy capability as they analyse, interpret, and draw conclusions from statistical information; for example, in relation to change over time.


Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Capability

Through the historical inquiry process, students extend their information and communication technology capability, particularly in relation to their investigation, analysis, interpretation, and communication of historical concepts, ideas, and information. Students use digital tools to locate and access information, create multimodal texts that communicate historical information, and understand the concept of contestability. They use ICT skills and understandings to investigate and identify the source and credibility of evidence, and to consider perspectives on historical information. Students investigate digital evidence, social media, archives, and the interpretations and representations of the past they convey, including how and why these sources are constructed and the audiences they serve. They explore how the use of ICT is transforming ways in which history is made, documented, and interpreted, and creating new spaces in which histories can be told and heard. Students develop an understanding of the issues involved in the use of ICT when practising ethical scholarship as part of the historical inquiry process.


Critical and Creative Thinking

Critical and creative thinking is integral to the historical inquiry process. Students consider the implications of missing or contestable information in their investigation of historical topics. Through their historical inquiry, students extend their skills in posing thoughtful questions; selecting, interrogating, and cross-referencing sources; and developing interpretations based on an assessment of the evidence and how it was constructed, and on reasoning. Students analyse, evaluate, and synthesise alternative interpretations and representations of the past. They think critically about who wrote or recorded histories, whose histories have been told, whose histories have not been included and why, and new spaces in which histories can now be told and heard.


Personal and Social Capability

Through their study of how individuals, groups, and societies interact and influence change in history, students enhance their personal and social capability. They explore the ideas that shaped developments and movements, and the growth of modern nations, and the impact of these events, experiences, and phenomena on people’s ideas, perspectives, circumstances, and identity. Students investigate and appreciate the perspectives and experiences of others through the practice of empathy. They extend their research and presentation skills to express and justify their views to others while acknowledging the contestability of sources and conclusions. Students develop increasing social awareness and are encouraged to draw conclusions about their world.


Ethical Understanding

Students apply and extend their skills in ethical understanding when investigating the diverse perspectives and circumstances that shape the actions and possible motivations of people and groups. Students explore the values, beliefs, and principles that formed the basis of judgments and actions of people in the past. They consider ethical and safe research processes, including respecting the rights and work of others, acknowledging sources, and observing protocols when approaching people and organisations.




Intercultural Understanding

Students consider the different beliefs and values of a range of groups across languages, cultures, and nations, and develop an appreciation of the diversity in the modern period. They study the interactions of modern nations and develop an understanding of the nature, causes, and consequences of conflict, dispossession, and interdependence. Students examine different contemporary perspectives on historical experiences, events, ideas, and phenomena. They explore the relationships between different groups within society and their historical contexts, and consider how these contribute to individual and group actions in the contemporary world.

Learning scope and requirements

Overview

Teachers should use the content descriptions of the Australian Curriculum to develop a program for their students. There are 42 content descriptions for History that are organised into two strands: historical knowledge and understanding, and historical skills. These strands are interrelated and have been developed to be taught in an integrated way, and in ways that are appropriate to specific local contexts.
The Year 10 achievement standard is aligned with the performance standards for Year 10 History. The performance standards are to be used for the assessment of student learning.
Content ‘elaborations’ (identified by ‘blue codes’ on the electronic version of the curriculum) are provided to illustrate and exemplify content and assist teachers to develop a common understanding of the content descriptions. They are intended as suggestions and are not mandated.
Teachers may elect to teach aspects of the curriculum relevant to their local area or context.

Course Structure

The following is a structural overview of the content of the Year 10 History course.




Year 10 History


Historical Knowledge and Understanding


Historical Skills


Teachers may integrate teaching of Overview and Depth Study



Course Overview: 10% of teaching time – Approximately 5 hours

(The broad narrative of the historical period 1919-present day: it makes links to and between depth studies and assists in consolidating understanding)





3 x Depth Studies: approximately 30% or 15 hours each


  1. WWII (1939-45)

  1. Rights and Freedoms (1945-present)

  1. Globalising World

Select ONE of the following electives




Popular culture

(1945 – present)



Migration experiences

(1945 – present)



The environment movement

(1960s – present)


Year 10 content descriptions



Historical Knowledge and Understanding

Overview content for the Modern World and Australia includes the following:



  1. the inter-war years between World War I and World War II, including the Treaty of Versailles, the Roaring Twenties and the Great Depression (ACOKFH018)

  2. continuing efforts post-World War II to achieve lasting peace and security in the world, including Australia’s involvement in UN peacekeeping (ACOKFH021)

  3. the major movements for rights and freedom in the world and the achievement of independence by former colonies (ACOKFH022)

  4. the nature of the Cold War and Australia’s involvement in Cold War and post-Cold War conflicts (Korea, Vietnam, The Gulf Wars, Afghanistan), including the rising influence of Asian nations since the end of the Cold War (ACOKFH023)

  5. developments in technology, public health, longevity and standard of living during the twentieth century, and concern for the environment and sustainability (ACOKFH024)


DEPTH STUDIES - There are three depth studies for this historical period

Depth Study 1 World War II (1939-45)

Students investigate wartime experiences through a study of World War II in depth. This includes a study of the causes, events, outcome and broader impact of the conflict as an episode in world history, and the nature of Australia’s involvement.




  1. Overview of the causes and course of World War II (ACDSEH024)

  2. Examination of significant events of World War II, including the Holocaust and use of the atomic bomb (ACDSEH107)

  3. Experiences of Australians during World War II (such as Prisoners of War (POWs), the Battle of Britain, Kokoda, the Fall of Singapore) (ACDSEH108)

  4. The impact of World War II, with a particular emphasis on the Australian home front, including the changing roles of women and use of wartime government controls (conscription, manpower controls, rationing and censorship) (ACDSEH109)

  5. The significance of World War II to Australia’s international relationships in the twentieth century, with particular reference to the United Nations, Britain, the USA and Asia (ACDSEH110)


Depth Study 2 Rights and freedoms (1945 – the present)

Students investigate struggles for human rights in depth. This will include how rights and freedoms have been ignored, demanded or achieved in Australia and in the broader world context.




  1. The origins and significance of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, including Australia’s involvement in the development of the declaration (ACDSEH023)

  2. Background to the struggle of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples for rights and freedoms before 1965, including the 1938 Day of Mourning and the Stolen Generations (ACDSEH104)

  3. The US civil rights movement and its influence on Australia (ACDSEH105)

  4. The significance of the following for the civil rights of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples: 1962 right to vote federally; 1967 Referendum; Reconciliation; Mabo decision; Bringing Them Home Report (the Stolen Generations), the Apology (ACDSEH106)

  5. Methods used by civil rights activists to achieve change for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, and the role of ONE individual or group in the struggle (ACDSEH134)

  6. The continuing nature of efforts to secure civil rights and freedoms in Australia and throughout the world, such as the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (2007) (ACDSEH143)


Depth Study 3 The globalising world
Students investigate one major global influence that has shaped Australian society in depth, including the development of the global influence during the twentieth century.
Select ONE elective: Popular culture  Migration experiences  The environment movement.



Popular culture

(1945 – Present)

  1. The nature of popular culture in Australia at the end of World War II, including music, film and sport (ACDSEH027)

  2. Developments in popular culture in post-war Australia and their impact on society, including the introduction of television and rock ’n’ roll (ACDSEH121)

  3. Changing nature of the music, film and television industry in Australia during the post-war period, including the influence of overseas developments (such as Hollywood, Bollywood and the animation film industry in China and Japan) (ACDSEH122)

  4. Australia’s contribution to international popular culture (music, film, television, sport) (ACDSEH123)

  5. Continuity and change in beliefs and values that have influenced the Australian way of life (ACDSEH149)


Migration experiences

(1945 – Present)

  1. The waves of post-World War II migration to Australia, including the influence of significant world events (ACDSEH144)

  2. The impact of changing government policies on Australia’s migration patterns, including abolition of the White Australia Policy, ‘Populate or Perish’ (ACDSEH145)

  3. The impact of at least ONE world event or development and its significance for Australia, such as the Vietnam War and Indochinese refugees (ACDSEH146)

  4. The contribution of migration to Australia’s changing identity as a nation and to its international relationships (ACDSEH147)


The environment movement (1960s – Present)

  1. The background to environmental awareness, including the nineteenth century National Parks movement in America and Australia (ACDSEH028)

  2. The intensification of environmental effects in the twentieth century as a result of population increase, urbanisation, increasing industrial production and trade (ACDSEH125)

  3. The growth and influence of the environment movement within Australia and overseas, and developments in ideas about the environment including the concept of ‘sustainability’ (ACDSEH126)

  4. Significant events and campaigns that contributed to popular awareness of environmental issues, such as the campaign to prevent the damming of Australia’s Gordon River, the nuclear accident at Chernobyl and the Jabiluka mine controversy in 1998 (ACDSEH127)

  5. Responses of governments, including the Australian Government, and international organisations to environmental threats since the 1960s, including deforestation and climate change (ACDSEH128)


Historical Skills
Chronology, terms and concepts

  1. Use chronological sequencing to demonstrate the relationship between events and developments in different periods and places (ACHHS182)

  2. Use historical terms and concepts (ACHHS183)

Historical questions and research



  1. Identify and select different kinds of questions about the past to inform historical inquiry (ACHHS184)

  2. Evaluate and enhance these questions (ACHHS185)

  3. Identify and locate relevant sources, using ICT and other methods (ACHHS186)

Analysis and use of sources



  1. Identify the origin, purpose and context of primary and secondary sources (ACHHS187)

  2. Process and synthesise information from a range of sources for use as evidence in an historical argument (ACHHS188)

  3. Evaluate the reliability and usefulness of primary and secondary sources (ACHHS189)

Perspectives and interpretations



  1. Identify and analyse the perspectives of people from the past (ACHHS190)

  2. Identify and analyse different historical interpretations (including their own) (ACHHS191)

Explanation and communication



  1. Develop texts, particularly descriptions and discussions that use evidence from a range of sources that are referenced (ACHHS192)

  2. Select and use a range of communication forms (oral, graphic, written) and digital technologies (ACHHS193)


Year 10 achievement standard

By the end of Year 10, students refer to key events, the actions of individuals and groups, and beliefs and values to explain patterns of change and continuity over time. They analyse the causes and effects of events and developments and explain their relative importance. They explain the context for people’s actions in the past. Students explain the significance of events and developments from a range of perspectives. They explain different interpretations of the past and recognise the evidence used to support these interpretations.


Students sequence events and developments within a chronological framework, and identify relationships between events across different places and periods of time. When researching, students develop, evaluate and modify questions to frame a historical inquiry. They process, analyse and synthesise information from a range of primary and secondary sources and use it as evidence to answer inquiry questions. Students analyse sources to identify motivations, values and attitudes. When evaluating these sources, they analyse and draw conclusions about their usefulness, taking into account their origin, purpose and context. They develop and justify their own interpretations about the past. Students develop texts, particularly explanations and discussions, incorporating historical argument. In developing these texts and organising and presenting their arguments, they use historical terms and concepts, evidence identified in sources, and they reference these sources. [Australian Curriculum]

Assessment scope and requirements

Evidence of learning

The following assessment types enable students to demonstrate their learning in History at Year 10.



  • Assessment Type 1: Historical Skills

  • Assessment Type 2: Historical Study

At Year 10, students provide evidence of their learning through FOUR assessments. Each assessment type should have a weighting of at least 20%.


Students undertake:

  • three historical skills assessments

  • one historical study.

Assessment design criteria

The assessment design criteria are based on the ACARA achievement standard and are used by teachers to:



  • clarify for the student what he or she needs to learn

  • design assessment tasks that allow students to achieve at the highest level.

The assessment design criteria consist of specific features that:



  • students need to demonstrate in their evidence of learning

  • teachers look for as evidence that students have met the achievement standards

For Year 10 History, the assessment design criteria are:



  • Understanding and Exploration

  • Application and Evaluation

  • Analysis

The specific features of these criteria are described below.


NB -Teachers please note:

  • Students must be assessed against the selected specific features within the assessment design criteria

  • each specific feature must be assessed at least once.

The set of assessments, as a whole, gives students opportunities to demonstrate each of the specific features by the completion of study of the subject.

YEAR 10 HISTORY ASSESSMENT DESIGN CRITERIA


Understanding and Exploration


Application and Evaluation

Analysis


UE1 Understanding and exploration of historical concepts.

UE2 Understanding and exploration of the role of ideas, people, and events in history.

AE1 Application of the skills of historical inquiry.

AE2 Examination and evaluation of sources and interpretations.

AE3 Use of evidence to support arguments and draw conclusions.

AE4 Communication of reasoned historical arguments, with acknowledgment of sources.



A1 Analysis of short-term and long-term impacts of developments and/or movements in the modern world.

A2 Analysis of ways in which societies in the modern world have been shaped by both internal and external forces and challenges.



YEAR 10 HISTORY ASSESSMENT OVERVIEW




NTBOS

Year 10 Subject

List of Australian Curriculum Content Strands and Descriptions

Summary of Assessment Types,

Tasks and Weighting


List of Performance Standards for Assessment


History


Knowledge and Understanding

1-5

World War II



1 – 8

Rights and Freedoms

1-6

The Globalising World



1-4/5

Historical Skills

1 - 12


Assessment types:

1: HISTORICAL SKILLS



  • at least one sources analysis

  • at least one argument

  • one alternative task

2: HISTORICAL STUDY

  • one historical study

Tasks and Weighting:




  • students provide evidence of their learning through four assessment tasks

  • each assessment type should have a weighting of at least 20%.

  • each assessment task should be no more than 800 words, or 5 minutes, or the equivalent presented in multimodal



Understanding and Exploration (UE)

1 – 2

Application and Evaluation (AE)



1 – 4

Analysis (A)

1 - 2


School assessment



Assessment Type 1: Historical Skills

Students complete 3 historical skills assessments.


Students apply their skills of historical inquiry to research, explore, interpret, and communicate their understanding of ideas, people, and events in history. They develop their historical literacy skills, including by exploring short-term and long-term impacts of ideas, people, groups, and events; analysing and evaluating historical sources; interpreting historical texts; and developing their own perspectives on historical questions.
These assessments will include:

  • at least one sources analysis

  • at least one argument (usually an essay)

  • one alternative assessment


Sources Analysis

Students undertake at least one sources analysis assessment.

In the sources analysis task, students use, interpret, evaluate, and reflect on a selection of different historical sources. Sources may include letters, photographs, film, cartoons, statistics, graphs, maps, journals, newspapers, official reports, oral histories, and books.

Teachers are encouraged to use a range of questions and techniques suitable for the examination of historical sources.

A suitable sources analysis task may include questions that assess a student’s ability to:


  • comprehend information from sources

  • interpret / draw conclusions from sources

  • cross reference material from sources

  • analyse the limitations and usefulness of sources to the historian in terms of authenticity, bias, reliability and audience

  • analyse a proposition or question, using sources as evidence in an historical argument.

A selection of three to six sources for any one assessment should be sufficient. The sources may be selected by the teacher or by students in negotiation with their teacher.
Argument Task

Students undertake at least one argumentative task. Most students should have the opportunity to complete an argumentative essay. As with the historical study task, a historical argument essay requires students to:



  • apply the skills of historical inquiry to select and evaluate sources

  • develop a reasoned historical argument, based on analysis and interpretation of evidence from sources

  • draw conclusions supported by evidence

  • use subject-specific language

  • employ appropriate argument structure: introduction, main body paragraphs including turn of argument, and conclusion

  • appropriately acknowledge the sources used.


Alternative Task
The third assessment task may be written, oral or multi-modal. Options for this task include, but are not limited to the following assessment tasks/types:


  • essay

  • sources analysis

  • oral/ multimodal presentation

  • research assignment

  • an interview

  • debate

  • empathetic piece

  • historical report

  • time capsule

  • an obituary

  • a primary source trail

  • a webpage

  • historical media study

  • historical atlas

Historical skills tasks should be a maximum of 800 words, or 5 minutes, or the equivalent in multimodal form.
For this assessment type, students provide evidence of their learning in relation to the following assessment design criteria:

  • Understanding and Exploration

  • Application and Evaluation

  • Analysis


Assessment Type 2: Historical Study

Students complete one historical study in which they inquire into, interpret and research a historical topic in depth. The investigation should be on a topic linked to the material covered in class.


Students inquire into, explore, interpret and research a historical idea, event, person or group in depth.
The focus of the historical study may be chosen by the teacher or negotiated by the student.

The historical study may be presented in written, oral, or multimodal form. In whichever form, the historical study must enable students to:



  • apply the skills of historical inquiry to evaluate sources

  • develop a reasoned historical argument, based on analysis and interpretation of evidence from sources

  • draw conclusions supported by evidence

  • use subject-specific language

  • appropriately acknowledge the sources used.

The Historical Study should be a maximum of 800 words, or 5 minutes, or the equivalent in multimodal form.


For this assessment type, students provide evidence of their learning in relation to the following assessment design criteria:

  • Understanding and Exploration

  • Application and Evaluation

  • Analysis


Performance standards

The performance standards describe five levels of achievement, A to E. Each level of achievement describes the knowledge, skills and understanding that teachers refer to in deciding how well a student has demonstrated his or her learning on the basis of the evidence provided.

During the teaching and learning program the teacher gives students feedback on their learning, with reference to the performance standards.

At the student’s completion of study of a subject, the teacher makes a decision about the quality of the student’s learning by:


PERFORMANCE STANDARDS FOR YEAR 10 HISTORY







Understanding and Exploration

Application and Evaluation

Analysis

A

In-depth understanding and exploration of historical concepts.

Comprehensive understanding and insightful exploration of the role of ideas, people, and events in history.



Perceptive application of the skills of historical inquiry to identify and locate the most relevant sources.

Critical examination and evaluation of sources and interpretations.

Discerning use of relevant evidence to support arguments and draw insightful and relevant conclusions.

Precise communication of well-reasoned, coherent, and insightful historical arguments, with appropriate acknowledgment of sources.



Critical analysis of short-term and long-term impacts of developments and/or movements in the modern world.

Insightful and critical analysis of ways in which societies in the modern world have been shaped by both internal and external forces and challenges.



B

Some depth in understanding and exploration of historical concepts.

Some depth of understanding and thoughtful exploration of the role of ideas, people, and events in history.



Thoughtful application of the skills of historical inquiry to identify and locate a range of relevant sources.

Well-considered examination and evaluation of sources and interpretations.

Well-considered use of mostly relevant evidence to support arguments, and draw mostly relevant conclusions.

Clear communication of reasoned and coherent historical arguments, with some insights, and with appropriate acknowledgment of sources.



Some depth in analysis of
short-term and long-term impacts of developments and/or movements in the modern world.

Well-considered analysis of ways in which societies in the modern world have been shaped by both internal and external forces and challenges.



C

Understanding and exploration of historical concepts.

Understanding and considered exploration of the role of ideas, people, and events in history.



Application of the skills of historical inquiry to identify and select some relevant sources.

Examination of sources and interpretations, with some evaluation.

Use of generally relevant evidence to support arguments, and draw some relevant conclusions.

Mostly clear communication of generally reasoned and coherent historical arguments, with acknowledgment of sources.



Description, with some analysis, of short-term and long-term impacts of developments and/or movements in the modern world.

Description, with some analysis, of ways in which societies in the modern world have been shaped by both internal and external forces and challenges.



D

Some recognition of historical concepts.

Recognition and basic understanding of the role of ideas, people, and events in history.



Basic application of some skills of historical inquiry to identify and select sources.

Limited examination of some sources and interpretations, without evaluation.

Use of some information with partial relevance to support an argument, and draw basic conclusions.

Partial communication of a historical argument, with attempted acknowledgment of sources.



Description of basic short-term and/or long-term impacts of a development and/or movement in the modern world.

Superficial description of one or more ways in which societies in the modern world have been shaped by an internal or external force or challenge.



E

Attempted engagement with one or more historical concepts.

Awareness of one or more ideas, people, or events in history.



Attempted application of the skills of historical inquiry.

Attempted use of one or more sources or interpretations.

Attempted use of information of limited relevance.

Attempted description of a historical event, with limited or no acknowledgment of sources.



Attempted description of a
short-term or long-term impact of a development or movement in the modern world.

Attempted description of one way in which a society in the modern world has been shaped by an internal or external force.




Support materials

Advice on ethical study and research

Advice for students and teachers on ethical study and research practices is available in the Ethical Conduct of Research Policy and Procedures on the SACE website.


Glossary, student work samples and teacher resources
Australian Curriculum: History

  • Glossary

Australian Curriculum: History Year 10 Work Sample Portfolios




  • Year 10 History portfolio – Satisfactory

  • Year 10 History portfolio – Above Satisfactory

  • Year 10 History portfolio – Below Satisfactory

Australian Curriculum: History – Resource for Year 10 teachers from the Leading Learning Series – Making the Australian Curriculum Work for us.




  • History: what is it for?

https://www.sace.sa.edu.au/about/policies/research




References

Australian Curriculum and Assessment Authority. (2017, Jan 3). Implications for teaching, assessing and reporting. Retrieved from Australian Curriculum: http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au


Australian Curriculum and Reporting Authority. (2017, Jan 3). Australian Curriculum. Retrieved from www.australiancurriculum.edu.au
NTCET. (2017, Jan 3). Department of Education. Retrieved from www.nt.gov.au

Senior Years Curriculum www.nt.gov.au



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