National association for asian and pacific american education 33rd National Conference on


NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR ASIAN AND PACIFIC AMERICAN EDUCATION



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NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR ASIAN AND PACIFIC AMERICAN EDUCATION


33rd National Conference on

Critical Issues and Strategies



in Asian American and

Pacific Islander Education”




October 7-8, 2011

California State University, Long Beach, CA

Joint Sponsors

National Association for Asian and Pacific American Education

Asian Studies Graduate Society

National Association for the Education and Advancement of

Cambodian, Laotian, and Vietnamese Americans

Department of Asian and Asian American Studies,

California State University, Long Beach

NAAPAE CONFERENCE SCHEDULE

Friday, October 7, 2011
8:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. Registration University Student Union, Room 205
9:00 a.m. – 9:20 a.m. Plenary Session University Student Union, Room 205
Welcome
Dr. John N. Tsuchida, President

National Association for Asian and Pacific American Education
Teresa Zimmerman Liu, Past President

Asian Studies Graduate Society, CSULB
Jeffrey S. Zeiser, President

Asian Studies Graduate Society, CSULB
Dr. Chhany Sak-Humphry, President

National Association for the Education and

Advancement of Cambodian, Laotian, and Vietnamese Americans
Speakers
Mayor Bob Foster

Long Beach
The Honorable Bonnie Lowenthal

California State Assembly

9:30 a.m. – 10:55 a.m. First Concurrent Sessions
11:05 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Second Concurrent Sessions
12:30 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Lunch
2:00 p.m. – 3:25 p.m. Third Concurrent Sessions
3:35 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. Fourth Concurrent Sessions
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2011

CONCURRENT SESSIONS

9:30-10-55 a.m., University Student Union, Room 202
Panel: “I Left My Heart and Seoul: Teaching and Studying in Dankook’s South Korea”
This panel showcases the various insights California State University, Long Beach students experienced during their seven-week stay in Bundang, South Korea, through the lens of teaching, studying, cultural immersion, and historical perspectives.
Dr. John N. Tsuchida will present an overview of study abroad programs in Japan, Korea, Taiwan and Vietnam, which the Department of Asian and Asian American Studies has established to provide CSULB students with affordable international educational opportunities.
Andie Kim will present an overview of Korea, the Dankook University Summer Program, and teaching experience in the English Village at this university.
Veronica M. Gomez will navigate through Korea’s past and present, focusing on its music, art and historical sites.
Krystle (Ji-ae) Pleyto will talk about her own transformation through her exposure to the Korean language and pop culture.
Sopangia Tat will present “A Taste of Korea,” focusing on street food and the way Korean food is prepared and served.
Presenters:

Dr. Tsuchida is a Professor and the Chair of the Department of Asian and Asian American Studies at California State University, Long Beach. Since 2000, he has created seven study abroad programs in Japan, China, Korea, Taiwan and Vietnam, to provide CSULB students with affordable international education experience. Dr. Tsuchida is the President of the National Association for Asian and Pacific American Education (NAAPAE). He is an attorney licensed in California and Minnesota, and has served as NAAPAE’s legal counsel for the last 23 years.
Cara S. Kim, also known as Andie by many fellow peers, graduated from California State University, Long Beach, with a BA in Asian American Studies and a minor in Anthropology in the fall of 2010. She plans on pursuing a Master’s Degree in Educational Administration.
Veronica M. Gomez is currently a graduate student in the Asian Studies Program at California State University, Long Beach, researching the relationship between Asia and Latin America. She is now a die-hard lover of “kimchi.”
Krystle Pleyto graduated from California State University, Long Beach, with a BA in Asian American Studies in the fall of 2010. Through Dankook University’s Summer Program, she found her passion for teaching, especially abroad; she is currently considering the EPIK Program.
Sopangia Tat received her BA in English Literature from California State University, Long Beach in the spring of 2010. This was her first time traveling abroad while utilizing her field of interest, English, which led her to pursue a career in teaching abroad.
9:30-10:55 a.m., University Student Union, Room 204
Workshop: “NEA’s Priority Schools Campaign: Making Our Schools a Priority”
Turning around lower-performing schools is a high priority for the 3.2 million members of the National Education Association. By leading permanent changes in these Priority Schools, we will transform the lives of tens of thousands of students by significantly raising academic achievement.
Presenter: Monica Thammarath is the Senior Liaison for the Office of Minority Community Outreach at the NEA.  Prior to the NEA, she was the Education Policy Advocate for the Southeast Asia Resource Action Center, where she was the only full-time Washington-based staff focused on education advocacy for the AAPI communities. The daughter of refugees from Laos, Monica is a proud product of California’s public K-16 education system and alumna of the University of California, Berkeley.
Workshop: “Artistic Bridges for Cultural Communication”
Empower your students by integrating Art, the natural language embedded in all of us. Art provides a fascinating avenue of expression all ELL students enjoy and can use to increase vocabulary and intensify their depth of understanding. We will share and provide samples of our personalized lesson plans and activities for the novel Snow Flower and the Secret Fan and the works of contemporary Tacoma artists, such as Alfredo Arreguin.
Presenters: Bettina Stanley and Lisa Almonte are Tacoma Public Schools K-12 instructors of ESL / World Languages. They have over 20 years of experience teaching in Tacoma in the Second Language Acquisition Program. They have also taught in South Korea in an English immersion program for children. Both thrive on bringing new culturally diverse content to enrich the classroom. Tacoma Schools serve a large population of many languages and cultures with its intense network of ELL support systems.
9:30-10:55 a.m., University Student Union, Room 205
Workshop: “Making Meaning of Data: Exploring the Possibilities and Limitations of Data to Contextualize Asian and Pacific American Educational Outcomes”
The use of data for examining educational practices and policies has become a central component in current school reform efforts. Too often community and education leaders struggle with utilizing data to analyze and explore the educational outcomes of our school systems. This session will explore key public education data on Asian and Pacific American student performance in K-12 and higher education. Through this exploration participants will obtain current data on key educational benchmarks for Asian and Pacific American students and learn how to access public data for community analysis vis-à-vis our schools.
Presenter: Dr. José F. Moreno is an Associate Professor and the Chair of the Department of Chicano and Latino Studies at California State University, Long Beach. His area of emphasis is Latino/a Education and Policy Studies. Born in Guasave, Sinaloa, Mexico and raised in Oxnard, CA, he received his B.A. in Social Ecology from the University of California, Irvine; Ed.M. from Harvard University; and Ed.D. from the Harvard University Graduate School of Education in Administration, Planning, and Social Policy. He is a past Co-Chair of the Editorial Board of the Harvard Educational Review and researcher for the Harvard University Civil Rights Project.

He is a member of the Board of Education for the Anaheim City School District (ACSD).
9:30-10:55 a.m., University Student Union, Room 306
Panel: Multi-Perspective Chinese Teaching: Technology-Supported, Student Activities- Enhanced and Study Abroad-Oriented

This panel will present the current scenario of Chinese language teaching in the Department of Asian and Asian American Studies at California State University, Long Beach (CSULB). The panelists will introduce three aspects of teaching Mandarin Chinese: technology-supported, student activities-enhanced and study abroad-oriented.

The technology part will introduce how our faculty use multimedia software and web sites to support classroom teaching. The panelists will also describe the ongoing projects of long distance tutoring (by e-tutors from Beijing, Shanghai and Taipei).

Student activities include, but not limited to, skit and essay contests, newsletter and journal editing, and publications. Workshops on Asian food preparation (food and menu preparation and tasting) enhance students’ awareness of the relationship between food and culture.

Summer study abroad programs provide students with opportunities to study in Taiwan and Shanghai. The students earn CSULB credits from these international programs. They also improve their Chinese proficiency and develop cultural awareness and knowledge.
Panelists:

Dr. Tim Xie is a Professor of Chinese Studies and the Graduate Advisor in the Asian Studies Program at California State University, Long Beach.

Dr. Feng-ying Ming is an Associate Professor of Chinese Studies and the Undergraduate Advisor in the Chinese Studies Program at California State University, Long Beach.

Dr. Ruixi Ai is an Assistant Professor of Chinese Studies in the Department of Asian and Asian American Studies at California State University, Long Beach.

Jeffrey Winters is the Director of the College of Liberal Arts Language Lab and a Lecturer of Chinese Studies in the Department of Asian and Asian American Studies at California State University, Long Beach.

Xiaowen Wu and Ching-I Tsao are Lecturers of Chinese Studies in the Department of Asian and Asian American Studies at California State University, Long Beach.
11:05 a.m.-12:30 p.m., University Student Union, Room 202
Panel: “Culture and Education: Episodes from the Frontlines”
This panel will be looking at the role of culture in affecting and shaping the educational experience of both student and instructor. G. Garcia will be examining how cultural and linguistic background influences student performance in composition. L. Mandy will be discussing his experiences as an American teaching an Asian male/female relationship course in South Korea. L. Hashima will be looking at the depiction of Asian Americans in the media and literature. K. Oguri will be discussing the teaching of culture through an analysis of an exhibit in an Asian American community-based museum.
Panelists:

Gladys Garcia

Chicano and Latino Studies, CSULB
Lionel Mandy, Ph.D., Psy.D., J.D.

Africana Studies, CSULB
Lawrence Hashima

Asian American Studies, CSULB
Kaoru Oguri, Ph.D.

Asian American Studies, CSULB
11:05 a.m.-12:30 p.m., University Student Union, Room 204
Paper: “Unexpected Heroes with Powerful Women: Jin Yong’s Construction of a Global Chinese Identity through his Martial Arts Stories”

This presentation will examine the characteristics of the global Chinese identity constructed through the martial arts stories of Jin Yong, the most popular 20th-century Chinese martial arts novelist. It will relate various aspects of this identity to Chinese-American youth and analyze what makes these characteristics appealing to them.

Presenter: Teresa Zimmerman-Liu, an MA candidate in the Department of Asian and Asian American Studies at California State University, Long Beach, researches the construction of Chinese identity through Jin Yong’s novels. She learned Chinese in Taiwan from 1982 to1990, lived in a Chinese-speaking family in the United States from 1990 to 2010, tutors ESL, and translates/interprets Chinese-English in the Chinese-American community.

Paper: “Advising Students in American Samoa”
The University of Hawaii at Manoa has a unique program that provides the opportunity for residents in American Samoa to get a Bachelor’s Degree in Elementary Education. Because of Samoa’s remote location from most providers of university education, the University of Hawaii at Manoa and the Department of Education in American Samoa have teamed up to provide opportunities for Samoan elementary school teachers to develop further teaching skills. This program utilizes faculty in Samoa, offers distance learning courses, and sends UH Manoa faculty to the island. Due to the complexity of the educational environment, academic advising becomes even more important to student success.
Presenter: Karen Wilson has been a teacher and teacher trainer for more than 30 years. She has been an academic advisor for the past four years. Karen loves working with students from other cultures and enjoys travel.
11:05 a.m.-12:30 p.m., University Student Union, Room 205
Workshop: “A Place for Cambodian History in Long Beach: Creating CamCHAP as a University-Community Partnership”
The Cambodian Community History and Archive Project (CamCHAP) is a physical archive and a digital ethnographic website. Presenters discuss the creation of CamCHAP and invite comments on issues of culture, history, and representation.
Presenters: Dr. Karen Quintiliani is an applied anthropologist at California State University, Long Beach. Dr. Susan Needham is a linguistic anthropologist at California State University, Dominguez Hills. Both professors have been working and conducting research in the Long Beach Cambodian community since 1988. They are the co-founders of the Cambodian Community History and Archive Project (www.camchap.org), a university-community partnership.
11:05 a.m.-12:30 p.m., University Student Union, Room 306
Panel: “Relationship of Language Background to Writing Ability among Young Learners of Japanese”
Dr. Masako Douglas will relate research findings regarding the development of the narrative writing ability of young JHL (Japanese as a heritage language) learners in an immersion program, in comparison with the writing ability of JFL (Japanese as a foreign language) learners in the same program. Dr. Hiroko Kataoka will report the results of a family and home background survey at the immersion program where the narrative writing study was conducted. She will discuss how the JHL children's family backgrounds relate to their writing ability. Dr. Kiyomi Chinen will discuss the familial factors that contribute to the development of Japanese language proficiency (i.e., the narrative writing skills) of students who attend a Japanese heritage language school in Southern California.
Presenters: Drs. Hiroko Kataoka, Masako Douglas, and Kiyomi Chinen are, respectively, a Professor, an Associate Professor, and an Assistant Professor of Japanese at California State University, Long Beach. They are nationally recognized experts on Japanese Pedagogy and heritage Japanese instruction.
2:00-3:25 p.m., University Student Union, Room 204
Paper: “A Qualitative Study of Cambodian Transnational Marriages to the U.S.”
This paper analyzes the experience of Cambodian women in cross border marriages, focusing on how they negotiate space and remain resilient in their everyday lives here in the United States. The paper also discusses: (1) those factors which caused Khner women to choose to emigrate to the United States; (2) the reasons why the American Dream turned out so different from what they had thought; and (3) the social obligations these women have as daughters and/or mothers that prevent them from returning to their homeland.
Presenter: Chrysna Samel came to the United States with her family as a young refugee from Cambodia. She is currently a Math teacher at the Long Beach School for Adults and graduate student in the Anthropology Department at California State University, Long Beach.

Paper: “Advantages and Challenges of ESL Teaching in Japan”

This presentation will discuss the presenter’s personal experiences teaching English in Japan for two years and the specific methods used, difficulties encountered, and the rewarding aspects of ESL education in a Japanese context.

Presenter: After graduation from the University of California, Riverside, Jeffrey Scott Zeiser spent over two years living and working in Japan. Upon return he entered the Asian Studies Graduate Program at California State University, Long Beach. His current studies focus on Japanese history and culture in the post-World War II period.


2:00-3:25 p.m., University Student Union, Room 205
Paper: “From Enemies to Saviors? Mexican Workers and American Unions”

This paper examines why American unions are now organizing immigrants as well as native-born and permanent legal residents after decades of hostility toward immigrants, especially the undocumented. Mexican workers entered a new era with American unions in the late 1970s. American unions have apparently accepted the inevitability of organizing the Mexicans and admitting them into membership. In 2000, the unions also reversed their long-standing policy that the U.S. Congress restrict immigration from south of the border. ‘Mexicanos’ have since emerged as important union leaders in their own right. In spite of these achievements, it’s still evident that many union members still remain, nevertheless, hostile or ambivalent at best toward Mexican and Latino workers, especially illegal immigrants. To what extent, then, have American unions truly embraced ‘mexicanos’ as fellow workers and members -- from enemies to saviors?
Presenter: Dr. Arroyo is a Professor, and former Chair, of Chicano and Latino Studies at CSULB. He earned his Ph.D. in U.S. History at UCLA; his research focuses on the incorporation of workers of color into American industries and unions from 1850 to the present. He is completing a book manuscript tentatively entitled “The Rise and Fall of a Communist-Led Local: United Furniture Workers of America, Local 576, Los Angeles, 1931-1960.”
2:00-3:25 p.m., University Student Union, Room 306
Workshop: “21st Century Education — Framing a New Vision and Its Impact on APIs”
State and national policy makers are debating the direction and purpose of k-16 education. What do we mean when we say we are preparing students for college and careers? What content do we teach and how do we assess student learning?  The new "Common Core" standards in Reading and Math could change the way teaching, learning and assessments are implemented, yet there has been little attention paid to how this will impact a large proportion of the "achievement gap" students—namely the "Long Term English Learners."   This presentation examines the P21 (Partnership for 21st Century) Framework" and how it can support English Learners and APIs and frame the issues of multicultural education and bilingualism as a national education priority.

 

Presenter: Michael Matsuda is the Coordinator for Teacher Support and Professional Development for the Anaheim Union High School District. He is additionally a Trustee for the North Orange County Community College District, Chair of the Orange County Asian Pacific Islander Community Alliance, Vice-President of Californians Together (a statewide English Learner consortium), and Co-Chair of P21 California.


3:35-5:00 p.m., University Student Union, Room 204
Workshop: "Current Issues of Asian Canadian Students in Toronto"

 

This workshop will provide participants with an overview of current educational and social issues surrounding the Asian Canadian community in Toronto. The session will be interactive and participants will be encouraged to respond to questions and engage in a dialogue with the presenter.



Presenter: Gary Kamino is the President of the Canadian Chapter of the National Association for Asian and Pacific American Education.

Panel: “Service Learning Innovations at California State University, Long Beach”
Focusing on the crossroads of business, nonprofit, and government, service learning innovations at California State University, Long Beach blends business models and cultural principles to engage in public and private business projects to bring about economic empowerment and positive social change in ethnic communities.
Presenters:

Dr. Juan M. Benitez is the Executive Director of the Center for Community Engagement (CCE) at California State University, Long Beach (CSULB). As Executive Director of the CCE, Dr. Benitez heads university-wide community engagement projects, programs, activities, and initiatives.
Dr. Lynn V. Dymally is a Faculty Fellow from the College of Business Administration to the Center for Community Engagement at California State University, Long Beach. Her Fellowship responsibilities include the identification of community engagement opportunities together with the development of service learning projects associated with economic development in ethnic communities for ethnic studies students at CSULB.
3:35-5:00 p.m., University Student Union, Room 205
Paper: “Looking Back, Looking Forward: Cambodian Families Fifteen Years after Welfare Reform”
Based upon ethnographic research that began when welfare reform was implemented in Los Angeles County, this paper looks back at how welfare reform changed the lives of Cambodian adults and youth and discusses 1) the type of programs that made a difference to families in poverty; 2) the current implications of the economic downturn; and 3) the need for continued applied research in this area.
Presenter: Dr. Karen Quintiliani is an Associate Professor of Anthropology at California State University, Long Beach. She has conducted research in the Long Beach Cambodian community since 1988. Her research and teaching interest focuses on applied anthropology. She is the co-founder with Dr. Susan Needham of the Cambodian Community History and Archive Project (www.camchap.org).
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