Muslims in America: Beyond Stereotypes



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Muslims in America: Beyond Stereotypes
Lesson Author: Suzy Anderson, Lesson Advisor Dr. Edward Curtis IV

Date: July 2018


This lesson was created as part of the NEH Seminar Muslim American History and Life, a 2018 National Endowment for the Humanities program for k-12 teachers, led by Dr. Edward Curtis IV at Indiana University—Purdue University Indianapolis. The seminar focused on understanding what it means to be both Muslim and American. Participants explored this topic through analysis of primary source documents, academic monographs, fieldtrips, seminar discussions and group collaboration.

Table of Contents

Overview …. 2.
Standards … 8.
Bibliography … 10.
Lesson One … 13.
Lesson Two … 35
Lesson Three … 81.
Assessment … 85.

Mini-Unit Overview
Context:

This is a three-lesson mini-unit for seventh grade English that immediately follows two History units: the Islamic Civilizations and Empires Unit (pre-Islamic Arabia until 1750) and an independent research unit on a current events issue in a Muslim majority country. The goal is for students to be able to connect what they know about Islam and Muslims, both historically and currently, throughout the world, to Muslims in America, both historically and currently. By drawing on their knowledge of Islam and Muslims in world history, they will be able to deepen their understanding of Islam and Muslims in US History and be able to draw upon this knowledge as they focus on US History in eighth grade. The mini-unit begins with Lesson One: Muslim American Demographics that introduces students to current demographic data about Muslim Americans, answering questions such as: How many Muslims are there in America? When did they come? Where do they live? Lesson Two: Muslim American Voices during which students will explore the concept of identity and deepen their understanding of how people create their own identities and also how people impose stereotyped identities on groups. Students will read poems, memoirs, and interviews of Muslim Americans. While reading these texts, students will deepen their understanding of the complexity and diversity of Muslim Americans both historically and today, begin to understand how Muslim Americans view themselves and how non-Muslims view them, and be able to recognize stereotypes of Muslim Americans, and the Islamophobia they create that has increased in post 9/11 U.S. society. Students will participate in small group and whole group discussions in order to deepen their understanding. A written reflection of how their understanding end the lesson and then students will view Being Muslim in America, an 18-minute video, documenting the stories and views of Muslim Americans which serves as a transition to Lesson 3: Religious Pluralism. This last lesson begins with asking students what freedoms groups in society have. Students are asked to compose a list of what freedoms they think certain groups have. Then students view Fremont, U.S.A. in order to understand the concept of religious pluralism in the United States, to understand first amendment rights, and to explore the idea of what freedoms minority groups have in majority dominated societies. Although this mini-unit has a specific context, many parts could be easily adapted for other purposes.



Mini-Unit Topic: Muslims in America: Beyond Stereotypes
Mini-Unit Lessons:

1. Muslim American Demographics

2. Muslim American Voices

3. Religious Pluralism, Fremont, U.S.A.

4. Assessment

Lesson 1: Focus Question

How does exploring basic demographic data of Muslim Americans contribute to our understanding of the diversity and complexity of the Muslim American population? What do we learn from the “numbers” that help us dispel stereotypes of Muslim Americans?


Lesson 2: Focus Question

How do our understandings of Muslim Americans change by hearing their voices? What do we learn from these voices that deepen our understanding of the complex and diverse identities of Muslim Americans? What do we learn from these voices that contribute to our understanding of the freedoms that groups have in society? What do we learn from these voices that help us to understand the gap between how people perceive their own identity and how people in society impose identities, and stereotypes, both positive and negative, upon them.


Lesson 3: Focus Question

What freedoms do groups in societies possess? What is religious pluralism? What promotes freedom? What limits freedom?


Assessment Question:

How has your understanding of Muslim Americans changed during this mini-unit?


Course Level Question:

What are the relationships—social, legal, economic, cultural, religious—between dominant groups in society and those they dominate?


Lesson 1. Teaching Thesis

Too often, facts are distorted to support political agendas. It is important to have a basic understanding of Muslim American demographics, to free these numbers from hyperbolic speech, and allow students to view these facts objectively. Students will develop a basic understanding of Muslim American demographics to better understand this group.


Lesson 2. Teaching Thesis

It is not enough to provide opportunities for those whose histories have been “written out of history” to have voice, those voices must be heard. If they are not heard, a dominant narrative of stereotyped identities are imposed on these people and groups. This imposition of stereotyped identities upon Muslim American men and women in post 9/11 has led to Islamophobia, and has resulted in discrimination against Muslims carried out both by individuals and the state. Understanding structural and institutional causes of Islamophobia, which in some cases, have also led to hate crimes, is critical to understanding the relationships between the dominant groups and those they dominate. In asking students to hear multiple Muslim American voices, they will be able to begin to construct their understanding of the complexity of what it means to be both Muslim and American in America, while at the same time, understanding the process Muslim Americans go through to construct their own identities.


Lesson 3. Teaching Thesis

The narratives deepen our understanding of the complexity of identity in America, especially religious identity. We begin to understand that all groups in society do not share the same freedoms, despite constitutional rights to these freedoms. Students reflect on the concept of freedom. What limits freedom? What promotes freedom? In exploring the idea of religious pluralism, students will be able to deepen their understanding of the relationships between dominant groups in society and those they dominate.


Assessment Teaching Thesis

Asking students to reflect on how their understanding has changed during this mini-unit, specifically in terms of understanding the complexity and diversity of Muslim American identity, is necessary to understand the relationships of what freedoms different groups in society.




Mini-Unit Components

Lesson 1: Muslim American Demographics
Time: Two—sixty minute sessions
Contents:

—using knowledge from the last two units, students will brainstorm answers to questions about current Muslim American demographics and complete a brief think write

—students will discuss and justify their guesses in their small groups

—students will share-out answers in “fun” game (Jeopardy) format

—teacher will review and give “correct” answers

—students will write down correct answers

—teacher will lead an appropriate discussion and answer questions that arise

—students will view the video from Pew Research Center: Being Muslim in America (18:18) from April 17, 2018. http://www.pewforum.org/2018/04/17/video-being-muslim-in-the-u-s/

—students will write a brief reflection: How did your understanding of Muslim Americans change

during this activity



Summary Question:

How does exploring basic demographic data of Muslim American contribute to our understanding of the diversity and complexity of the Muslim American population? What do we learn from the “numbers” that help us to dispel stereotypes of Muslim Americans?



Student Task:

Individually, students will try to guess answers to questions 1-9. After enough time has lapsed, (usually when students start talking), the teacher will instruct students to discuss their guesses in their groups of 4. While teacher leads a sharing out of guesses, students will record answers on their handout. After reviewing all answers, students will watch video and record their thoughts about how their understanding of Muslim Americans has changed based on this lesson.



Supporting materials:

—Student Handout for Muslim American Demographics, Questions 1-9

—Student Handout for think write

—Lesson One Vocabulary List

—Video “Being Muslim in America”

—Teacher Guide

—including answers for Questions 1-9

Lesson 2: Muslim American Voices
Time: Four—sixty minute sessions
Contents:

—as an introduction to Lesson 2, students will complete an identity exercise that highlights the differences between the way people view themselves and how others view them, or how they see themselves and what stereotyped identities society imposes upon them

—students read Anchor Voice: Mohja Kahf

—teacher will model how to perform activity

—discussion and review of procedures

—students will be divided into six groups and each group will receive one Muslim Voice

(there are eight to choose from, and more may be added to make them appropriate for student reading levels)

—students will read Muslim Voice individually and answer questions on student handout

—students will discuss their answers in small groups

—students will share out to whole group in format to be decided

—whole class discussion

—teacher will explicitly teach about stereotyping, discrimination and Islamophobia

—teacher will share 3 cases of Islamophobia

—students will view the video from Pew Research Center: Being Muslim in America (18:18) from April 17, 2018. http://www.pewforum.org/2018/04/17/video-being-muslim-in-the-u-s/

—students will read Final Anchor Muslim Voice 10 for homework , highlight, annotate, complete student handout and come prepare for a whole class discussion the next day

—small group discussion about Final Anchor Muslim Voice 10

—whole class discussion about Final Anchor Muslim Voice 10

—students will write a reflection:

How has your understanding of Muslim Americans changes during this activity?

—students will watch 5-minute video A Land Called Paradise



Summary Question:

How do our understandings of Muslim Americans change by hearing their voices? What do we learn from these voices that deepens our understanding of the complex and diverse identities of Muslim Americans? What does it mean to be both Muslim and American in America? What do we learn from these voices that contribute to our understanding of the freedoms that groups have in society?



Student Tasks:

Students are introduced to the concept of identity and complete an identity box. Inside the box, students write how they see themselves. Outside the box, students write how they think they are viewed by others, and by society. After this the teacher will lead a brief discussion about identity formation, both by individuals and groups, and both from within a person and from without. Students will read along with the teacher as teacher reads aloud Mohja Kahf’s poem “My Grandmother Washes Her Feet in the Sink of the Bathroom at Sears”. Students will seek to understand how the grandmother views her complex Muslim American identity and how society views her. Students will complete the student handout and participate in small group discussions and then share in a whole group teacher-led discussion. Then students will apply this same analysis to one of the selected Muslim Voices that their group receives. Each student will read the text individually, highlighting and annotating and then complete the handout. When all students in the group are finished, they will hold a small group discussion about the text, guided by the questions. They should use textual evidence to support their ideas. Each group will decide how to share out about the text they read. After each group shares out, a whole class teacher-led discussion follows. Teacher will explicitly teach about stereotyping, discrimination and Islamophobia and share 3 cases of Islamophobia. Students will then view the Pew Research Center video: Being Muslim in America (18:18). For homework, all students will read the Final Anchor Muslim Voice 10, highlighting and annotating the text and completing the Student Handout. They should be prepared to discuss the text the next day when they will meet in their same small groups and discuss their ideas. A whole class discussion follows. Students will then write a reflection about how their understanding of Muslim Americans has changed from the beginning of the mini-unit and after the demographics lesson. This lesson ends with students watching the 5-minute video: A Land Called Paradise.




Supporting materials:

—Student Handout for identity box

—Student Handout for all the voices, each student will need three: beginning anchor, group voice and final anchor

—Lesson Two Vocabulary List

—Beginning Anchor Muslim Voice (all students read)

—8 Muslim Voices, which may include: interviews, poems and memoirs

—Islamophobia Cases from 2016

—Final Anchor Muslim Voice (all students read)

—written reflection

Land of Paradise video

—Teacher Guide

Lesson 3: Religious Pluralism, Fremont U.S.A.
Time: Two sixty-minute sessions
Contents:

—questions and answers for what questions could be posed to understand what freedoms

certain groups in society have

—viewing Fremont, U.S.A., a documentary about religious pluralism in a Northern Californian suburb

—discussion following movie
Summary Question:

How can we tell what freedoms groups in societies possess? What limits freedom? What promotes freedom?



Student Task:

Working in small groups, students will draw upon what they have learned so far, understanding how Muslim Americans have integrated into a largely non-Muslim American society, historically and currently, to brainstorm a list of questions with the goal of identifying what freedoms different groups in society have. Students will consider how these freedoms came about. Were they guaranteed by law or freedoms that came about from social interactions? To help with the task, students will view the one-hour documentary, Fremont, U.S.A. and answer a series of questions about religious pluralism in a suburban Northern California setting. After doing so and taking part in a whole class discussion, students will be given a chance to review their list of questions. Students will share their questions on big sheets of paper for a gallery walk, or each student can contribute one question in a Padlet format projected for all to see.


Supporting materials:

—Student Handout for listing freedoms

—Lesson Three Vocabulary List

—Video: Fremont, U.S.A.

—Teacher Guide

Assessment:
Time: One—sixty minute session
Contents:

—written reflection


Summary Question:

How has your understanding of Muslim Americans changed during this mini-unit?


Student Task:

Students reflect on what they have learned during this mini-unit. They should read their first two written reflections and turn in all three.


Supporting materials:

—Student Handout for Written Reflection

—Teacher Guide


California Common Core Curriculum Standards

English Language Arts

English Language Arts Standards » Reading: Informational Text » Grade 7
Key Ideas and Details:


CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.7.1
Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.7.2
Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.7.3
Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text (e.g., how ideas influence individuals or events, or how individuals influence ideas or events).


English Language Arts Standards » Writing » Grade 7


CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.9
Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.9.B
Apply grade 7 Reading standards to literary nonfiction (e.g. "Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims").


English Language Arts Standards » Speaking & Listening » Grade 7
Comprehension and Collaboration:


CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.7.1
Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly.


CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.7.1.A
Come to discussions prepared, having read or researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence on the topic, text, or issue to probe and reflect on ideas under discussion.


CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.7.1.B
Follow rules for collegial discussions, track progress toward specific goals and deadlines, and define individual roles as needed.


CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.7.1.C
Pose questions that elicit elaboration and respond to others' questions and comments with relevant observations and ideas that bring the discussion back on topic as needed.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.7.1.D


Acknowledge new information expressed by others and, when warranted, modify their own views.


CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.7.2
Analyze the main ideas and supporting details presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and explain how the ideas clarify a topic, text, or issue under study.


CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.7.3
Delineate a speaker's argument and specific claims, evaluating the soundness of the reasoning and the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.

Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas:




CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.7.4
Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.


English Language Arts Standards » Language » Grade 7
Vocabulary Acquisition and Use:


CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.7.6
Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.


Note:

This mini-unit is for a seventh grade Core Class in California, which combines History and English. The History content standards are for World History from 330-1750, therefore the standards addressed for this mini-unit will be the English Language Arts standards for seventh grade.

Bibliography

Aljuwude, Shams. “Daughter of America.” Editors Abraham, Nabeel & Shryock, Andrew. Arab

Detroit: From Margin to Mainstream. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 2000. 
Barakat, Ibtisam. “Being Me.” Oklahoma Humanities Council.

http://www.okhumanities.org/Websites/ohc/images/Being_ME_--_Ibtisam_Barakat.pdf


“Being Muslim in America.” Pew Research Center.

http://www.pewforum.org/2018/04/17/video-being-muslim-in-the-u-s/. Accessed 19 July 2018.

Curtis IV, Edward, editor. The Columbia Sourcebook of Muslims in the United States. Columbia

University Press, 2008.

Curtis IV, Edward, editor. Encyclopedia of Muslim-American History Vol.2. Facts on File,

2010.


Facing History and Ourselves.

https://www.facinghistory.org/resource-library/teaching-strategies/identity-charts. Accessed 19 July 2018.


“The First American Muslims.” The Pluralism Project. Harvard University.

http://pluralism.org/religions/islam/islam-in-america/the-first-american-muslims/ Accessed 26 July 2018.


“First Muslim Congressman Prepares to Take Seat in Congress.” National Public Radio.

https://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=6513386&utm_source=npr_newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_content=20180717&utm_campaign=npr_email_a_friend&utm_term=storyshare. Accessed 19 July 2018.



Fremont, U.S.A. Pluralism Project at Harvard University, 2009.

http://pluralism.org/films/fremont-usa/. Accessed 19 July 2018.

Iftikhar, Arsalan Tariq. “I Believe in Allah and America.” Taking Back Islam,

edited by Michael Wolfe, Rodale, 2002, pp. 225-232.

Kahf, Mohja. “My Grandmother Washes Her Feet in the Sink of the Bathroom at Sears.”

https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/54253/my-grandmother-washes-her-feet-in-the-sink-of-the-bathroom-at-sears. Accessed 19 July 2018.
Khan, Lena. “A Land Called Paradise.” Link Media, Inc. 2008. Music by Kareem Salama.

https://archive.org/details/linktv_onenationwinners200720080909


Khan, Raqshan. “I Belong.” The Tam News.

http://thetamnews.org/features/i-belong/ Accessed 19 July 2018.


Moghul, Haroon in conversation with Terry Gross. “How to Be a Muslim Author on Being a

Spokesperson for His Faith.” National Public Radio.

https://www.npr.org/2017/07/06/535757103/how-to-be-a-muslim-author-on-being-a-spokesperson-for-his-faith. Accessed 24 July 2018.

“Muslim Congressman Andre Carson On The Bible Belt, Equal Marriage, Madrassas And An LGBT President.” Huffington Post.

https://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2014/11/20/muslim-congressman-andre-carson-_n_6189790.html?guccounter=1. Accessed 19 July 2018.


"Muslim Journeys | Item #85: WPA Interview with Mary Juma, 19th Century Syrian Immigrant in North Dakota", July 23, 2018 http://bridgingcultures.neh.gov/muslimjourneys/items/show/85
"Muslim Journeys | Item #169: Distribution of Muslim Population in the United States,

2010", http://bridgingcultures.neh.gov/muslimjourneys/items/show/309. Accessed 19 July 2018.


NPR. StoryCorps: Sharing and Preserving the Stories of Our Lives.

https://www.npr.org/series/4516989/storycorps. Accessed 26 July 2018.

The Pew Research Center: Religion and Public Life. http://www.pewforum.org/
Pluralism Project at Harvard University. http://pluralism.org/ Accessed 19 July 2018.

Touré, Halima. “You Seem So Intelligent. Why Are You a Muslim?” Taking Back Islam,

edited by Michael Wolfe, Rodale, 2002, pp. 122-126.
UC Berkeley History-Social Science Project.

http://ucbhssp.berkeley.edu/. Accessed 19 July 2018.

“WPA Interviews with Mary Juma and Mike Abdallah.” The Columbia Sourcebook of

Muslims in the United States, edited by Edward E. Curtis IV, Columbia University Press, 2008, pp. 30–33.  
Other Recommended Sources
Robbins, Liz. “Do You Know Me? Do You Know My Heart?” New York Times. December 10,

2015.https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2015/12/10/nyregion/muslims-in-new-york-react-to-donald-trump.html



Ramadan. Unity Productions Foundation, 2014.

https://ca.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/c242a960-8ebc-43c3-a155-b985b78a719d/ramadan/#.Wf_AY1ynF_U



Student Handout Lesson One: Muslim American Demographics
Question 1: Which religions has the most followers in the United States?

Rank the eight religions in order of which has the most followers in the U.S..

Then guess what percentage these followers represent of the total U.S. adult population.
The religious followers are:

Buddhists Muslims Protestants (Christians)

Catholics (Christians) Jews Religiously Unaffiliated

Hindus Mormons



Guess
Religion Percentage of total population
1. ___________________________ _____________
2. ___________________________ _____________
3. ___________________________ _____________
4. ___________________________ _____________
5. ___________________________ _____________
6. ___________________________ _____________
7. ___________________________ _____________

Fact
Religion Percentage of total population
1. ___________________________ _____________
2. ___________________________ _____________
3. ___________________________ _____________
4. ___________________________ _____________
5. ___________________________ _____________
6. ___________________________ _____________
7. ___________________________ _____________

Question 2: About how many Muslims currently live in America?
Guess Fact

_____________________________ _____________________________



What percentage of total Americans do Muslims represent?
Guess Fact

_____________________________ _____________________________


Tips: The current population in the US is about 326,000,000.

These numbers represent all ages (not just adults).




Question 3: Currently, what percentage of American Muslims fall into these categories?
Guess
Asian ______ Black ______ Hispanic/Latino ______ White ______

Fact
Asian ______ Black ______ Hispanic/Latino ______ White ______


Question 4: What percentage of Muslim Americans are:

Guess Facts
first-generation (not born in America) _______ _______
second-generation (having one parent not born in America) _______ _______
third-generation (both parents born in America) _______ _______

Question 5: What are the top nine countries that first-generation (foreign born) Muslim Americans have come from? Try to rank them in order.
Tip: Use you knowledge of Muslim majority countries and current events to answer this.

Guess
1. _____________________________ 6. _____________________________
2. _____________________________ 7. _____________________________
3. _____________________________ 8. _____________________________
4. _____________________________ 9. _____________________________
5. _____________________________

Fact
1. _____________________________ 6. _____________________________
2. _____________________________ 7. _____________________________
3. _____________________________ 8. _____________________________
4. _____________________________ 9. _____________________________
5. _____________________________


Question 6. When did most Muslim American immigrants arrive in the U.S.?
Rank when most came as 1, then 2, then 3.
Guess Fact
Before 1970 _________ _________
From 1970 to 1999 _________ _________
2000 or later _________ _________

Question 7: What might be some of the reasons Muslims left their countries and immigrated to America?
_______________________ _______________________ _______________________

_______________________ _______________________ _______________________
Question 8. Guess Fact
In how many states do Muslim Americans live? _________ _________
Name ten cities that have large Muslim American populations.
Guess Fact
1. ___________________________ 1. ___________________________
2. ___________________________ 2. ___________________________
3. ___________________________ 3. ___________________________
4. ___________________________ 4. ___________________________
5. ___________________________ 5. ___________________________
6. ___________________________ 6. ___________________________
7. ___________________________ 7. ___________________________
8. ___________________________ 8. ___________________________
9. ___________________________ 9. ___________________________
10. ___________________________ 10. ___________________________


Thinking question:

If the U.S. Census does not ask about religion, how might we know this?

(The answers for #8 are not from Pew.)
______________________________________________________________________

Question 9. What year did the first Muslim arrive in North America?
Guess __________________
Fact __________________
Student Handout Lesson One: Muslim American Demographics
Directions:
What else do you know about Muslim Americans?
Write down anything else that you think is important.
___________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________
Student Handout Lesson 1: Muslim American Demographics
Vocabulary List

convert (verb) to adopt a set of beliefs identified with one particular religious group to the exclusion of others
convert (noun) a person who adopts a set of beliefs identified with one particular

religious group to the exclusion of others


demographics statistical data relating to the population and particular groups within it
From Greek meaning:

demos the people

grapho writing, description, or measurement

first generation a person born in another country

American
second generation a person born in the US and has at least one parent

American who was an immigrant

third+ generation a person whose parents were both born in the U.S.

American
religious affiliation people who say they belong to a specific religion


religiously unaffiliated people who do not identify with a particular religious belief system or group (atheist, agnostic, no particular group)
Important Note:

Although the US Census does not ask about religious affiliation, the source for the answers to these questions is the Pew Research Center, a reliable source for this information.



Student Handout Lesson 1: Muslim American Demographics Reflection
Directions: Think for about five minutes about the answers to the questions. Then write for ten minutes. Spend about fifteen minutes total on this. Thanks.
Questions:

How has your thinking about Muslim Americans changed after learning about Muslim American demographics?
___________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________
Teacher Guide
Lesson 1: Muslim American Demographics
Teacher Directions
First 60-minute session
Teacher explains context to students:
Now that you know more about:

—the beliefs and practices of Islam

—how Islam started and spread

—how it relates to Judaism and Christianity

—the early Islamic Empires and Civilizations

—how many Muslims there are in the world and where they live


And now that you have:

—researched a Muslim majority country and its history



—researched a current issue in that country and presented your research to the class
We are shifting our focus to Muslims in America.

Directions: Write down answers for the following questions on a piece of paper. Don’t worry, if you don’t know the answer. It is fine to make an educated guess. Also complete the think write after question #9. When everyone is done guessing 1-9 and completing the think write, you will be able to talk to people in your group to discuss possible answers.
Discuss answers with the people in your group.
Teachers will lead a share-out. Students share out answers. This can be done in a fun “game show” style to create engagement. After a series of guesses, teacher should give “correct” answers. Students should record correct answers on their handout where it says FACT. Encourage students to ask questions. For example: Did the number of Syrian refugees increase because of the civil war? Or: Has the number of Muslims from Iran, Libya, Somalia, Syria and Yemen decreased because of President Donald Trump’s travel ban on immigrants from those countries?
Note: Teachers should try to anticipate student questions and be prepared to answer.
Note on sources:

Although the US Census does not ask about religious affiliation, the source for the answers to all these questions except #8 is the Pew Research Center, a reliable source for this information.
Source:

Pew Research Center for Religion and Public Life

http://www.pewresearch.org/about/

Question 1: Answer

Religion Name Percentage of total population
1. Christian (non-Catholic) 50%
2. Religiously unaffiliated 23%
3. Roman Catholic 21%
4. Jewish 2%
5. Other Faiths 2%
6. Muslim 1%
7. Buddhist 1%





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