Museum Entrance



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Museum Entrance

  • Welcome to the Lobby
  • Art and Environmental
  • Human Rights
  • Literature and Equality
  • Education and Rights
  • Women of History Museum
  • Visit the Curators
  • Artifact
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Curators Information

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  • Hello! We’re Emma Bjorklund a junior Elementary Education major, Ariana Moschini a junior Special Education major, Sarah Wasniewski a junior Elementary Education major, and Nicole Stolarski, a junior Special Education major at Bradley University in Peoria. Welcome to our museum featuring Women in History. Please explore our museum and learn about some of the wonderful and impactful work women have achieved in history and in present day.
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  • Note: Virtual museums were first introduced by educators at Keith Valley Middle School in Horsham, Pennsylvania. This template was designed by Lindsey Warneka under the direction of Dr. Christy Keeler during a Teaching American History grant module. View the Educational Virtual Museums website for more information on this instructional technique.
  • Standards:
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.2: Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.
  • Production and Distribution of Writing
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.6.4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. NCSS Standards:
  • Strand 6: Power, Authority, and Governance: Through study of dynamic relationships between individual rights and responsibilities, the needs of social groups, and concepts of a just society, learners become more effective problem-solvers and decision-makers when addressing the persistent issues and social problems in public life
  • REFERENCES

Maya Ying Lin

  • https://vimeo.com/124643902
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  • https://vimeo.com/124643902
  • https://www.nytimes.com/video/arts/design/1194832296918/maya-lin-s-wave-field.html
  • Women of History

Elizabeth Cady Stanton

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  • Women of History

Malala Yousafzai

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  • Artifact 8
  • Women of History

Maya Angelou

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  • Women of History

Jane Addams Statue

  • This statue is currently in the Peace Garden at California State University Fresno was originally dedicated to Ghandi on October 2, 1990. However, this life size bronze statue of Addams was dedicated in 2006 to the garden (Fresno State, 2015). She is shown holding an immigrant child, who is holding a globe. This resembles her work in the Hull-House, in which she helped co-found. This statue was created by a Fresno graduate student named Claudia Nolan and the base was created by Roy J. Bell. The sculpture was cast at Arizona Bronze Ateller in Tempe, Ariz and now stands on the black granite base that captures images of Addams’ life (Armbruster, 2006).
  • Armbruster, S. (2006, April 7). Jane Addams Peace Garden statue unveiled. Retrieved November 21, 2017, from http://www.fresnostatenews.com/2006/04/07/jane-addams-peace-garden- statue-unveiled/
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Civil Rights Memorial

  • The Civil Rights Memorial is a beautiful architectural piece by Maya Lin. It currently can be seen in Montgomery, Alabama. It is a black granite circular table with civil rights events listed in chronological order in a clockwise motion around the table and a black granite wall behind the table with the words “until justice rolls down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream” as used by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in his “I Have a Dream” speech with water flowing over both. While the table symbolizes the history, the wall refers to the ongoing struggle we still currently face, and the water flowing over them connects them. It was completed and dedicated in November 1989.
  • When Maya was first called by Southern Poverty Law Center, she was shocked there was not a national civil rights memorial yet. She wanted the memorial to show a glimpse of the era and intrigue those who visited to want to know more. Since the civil rights movement was a people’s movement, visitors follow around the table clockwise, reading the cause and effect of the civil rights events that occurred. This motion around the table and seeing how one’s actions can change history emphasized that this was and is still a people’s movement (Moyers, 2015) (Maya Lin: Designer of Memorials, 2003).
  • To hear more about this monument, listen to Bob Moyer’s interview with Maya Lin here: https://vimeo.com/124643902
  • Maya Lin: Designer of Memorials. (2003, March 01). Retrieved November 20, 2017, from
  • http://billmoyers.com/content/maya-lin/
  • Moyers, B. (2015). Maya Lin on Her Inspiration for the Civil Rights Memorial. Retrieved November 14,
  • 2017, from https://vimeo.com/124643902
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Maya Ying Lin

  • Maya Ying Lin was born on October 5,1959 in Athens Ohio. She later went to Yale and got her bachelor’s degree in sculpture and architecture when she graduated in 1981. When she was a senior, her design was chosen in a contest for the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. Shortly after, she went back to school at Harvard for architecture, but she ended up dropping out to work for an architect in Boston before returning back to Yale to finish her master’s in architecture. Two years later, she was asked to create the Civil Rights Memorial by the Southern Poverty Law Center in 1988. Following this, she has constructed many other wonderful works of sculpture, design, architecture, and art eventually using more natural elements. She considers herself an architect, sculptor, artist, and educator. Lin believes a lot of her works concentrate on history and teaching so that we learn history and don’t make the same mistakes as the past (Biography.com Editors, 2016) (Maya Lin: Designer of Memorials, 2003).
  • Biography.com Editors. (2016, November 18). Maya Lin Biography.com (A&E Television Networks, Ed.). Retrieved
  • November 20, 2017, from https://www.biography.com/people/maya-lin-37259
  • Maya Lin: Designer of Memorials. (2003, March 01). Retrieved November 20, 2017, from
  • http://billmoyers.com/content/maya-lin/
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Veterans Memorial Competition Drawing

  • In 1980, Lin’s senior year at Yale as an undergraduate student, she entered this piece into a contest for the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. It was a unique, simple and abstract design that showed the memorial being carved into the earth using black granite walls located at the northwest corner of the National Mall in Washington D.C.. These walls formed a V-shape and would have all veterans that were reported missing or deceased written up on the walls. The walls reach as tall as 247 feet and have over 58,000 soldiers names written in alphabetical order in the years that they were reported missing or deceased.
  • Being that this was unlike typical war memorials, it led to some controversy of her work. Most memorials typically show heroic figures in action. Her piece was much more abstract and which led to Vietnam Veterans clearly stating their harsh opinion of her idea after her piece won the contest. In response, a statue of three realistic veterans and a 60 foot flag pole was placed near Lin’s work, but far enough that it is still it’s own work. The memorial was opened to the public on November, 11th 1898 on Veterans Day. Eventually, many came to accept the memorial as it was and now more than 10,000 people visit it on the daily. Lin’s memorial received a 25 Year Award from the American Institute of Architects for its lasting power (Biography.com Editors, 2016) (Lin, 1980).
  • Biography.com Editors. (2016, November 18). Maya Lin Biography.com (A&E Television Networks, Ed.). Retrieved
  • November 20, 2017, from https://www.biography.com/people/maya-lin-37259
  • Lin, M. Y. (1980). [Vietnam Veterans Memorial. Competition drawing]. Retrieved November 15, 2017, from
  • https://www.loc.gov/item/97505164/
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Lin’s Storm King Wavefield

  • Following the Civil Rights Memorial, Lin turned to use more natural elements. In fact, she reused the idea of water in her three varying land sculptures all in different locations to resemble ocean waves but in grassy fields. This consists of Ann Arbor’s The Wave Field (1995), Miami’s Flutter (2005), and lastly New York’s Storm King Wavefield (2009). So although Storm King Wavefield was last, it covers over 500 acres and the waves reached as tall as 15 feet to really make you feel like you are in the waves. It is designed to be seen from multiple perspectives, such as an aerial view from the rim of the piece or from the ground and be submerged in the waves (Biography.com Editors 2016) (Cotter, 2010).
  • Please enjoy hearing Ms. Lin discuss the Storm King Wavefield as well as other natural pieces she is working on here: https://www.nytimes.com/video/arts/design/1194832296918/maya-lin-s-wave-field.html
  • Biography.com Editors. (2016, November 18). Maya Lin Biography.com (A&E Television Networks, Ed.). Retrieved
  • November 20, 2017, from https://www.biography.com/people/maya-lin-37259
  • Cotter, H. (2010, September 6). Always in Its Element, No Matter the Weather. Retrieved November 15, 2017, from
  • http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/07/arts/design/07storm.html.
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Elizabeth Cady Stanton

  • Elizabeth Cady Stanton advocated for women’s rights and suffrage. She lived in the 1800s, when women were unable to vote, to work in the same jobs as men, and attend the majority of universities. Elizabeth Cady Stanton was born on November 12, 1815 in Johnstown, New York. As a child, Elizabeth Cady Stanton attended Johnstown Academy with all boys in her math and language classes. This was very rare for the early 1800s for a girl to attend classes with all boys. She attended the Troy Female Seminary in Troy, New York, and graduated in 1832. In 1840, she married the abolitionist Henry Stanton. When Elizabeth and Henry traveled to the Word Anti-Slavery Convention, Elizabeth discovered women delegates were forbidden to enter. At the Convention, Elizabeth protested to participate. This sparked the beginning of Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s protests for women’s rights in politics. Stanton lived in New York City with her family from 1862 until she passed away in 1902. Elizabeth Cady Stanton was an inspiration for women by creating a change for women’s rights (Library of Congress, 2017).
  • Library of Congress. (2017). The only girl in school: Women’s rights. Retrieved from http://www.americaslibrary.gov/
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Woman’s Rights Convention: Roll of Honor

  • Elizabeth Cady Stanton led the First Women’s Rights Convention on July 19-20, 1848 in Seneca Falls, New York. She was inspired to lead the Convention from meeting with the abolitionists Lucretia Mott, Mary Ann M’ Clintock, Martha Wright, and Jane Hunt at the home of Jane and Richard Hunt on July 9, 1848. Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton began speaking out for women’s rights beginning at the World Anti-Slavery Convention. The women discussed the discrimination from male delegates when protesting against slavery in abolitionist conventions. As a result, Elizabeth Cady Stanton led the First Women’s Rights Convention in Seneca Falls, New York with these four women. In Seneca Falls, Stanton spoke out for women’s rights while being a mother of nine children and working in the home. She was a leader for women and spoke out against injustices for women in politics. Stanton helped write the Declaration of Sentiments that was presented at the Seneca Falls convention. Stanton fought for women’s rights to participate in any politics and vote. Stanton brought awareness to the injustices women experienced in politics and in the workplace in the United States (National Park Service, 2015). At the First Women’s Right’s Convention, Stanton protested for the women’s right to vote with the abolitionist, Frederick Douglass (Library of Congress, 2017).
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  • Library of Congress. (2017). The only girl in school: Women’s rights. Retrieved from http://www.americaslibrary.gov

Declaration of Sentiments

  • Elizabeth Cady Stanton collaborated to write the Declaration of Sentiments in 1848. This artifact, Declaration of Sentiments, was a petition for women’s right to vote, when attending the First Women’s Rights Convention in Seneca Falls, New York. This petition was for equal rights to participate in abolitionist debates, conventions, and have their vote count in debates. Stanton’s protest was that women could be a housewife and have the right to vote. She felt that she could be a mother and participate in politics as a delegate at the same time. Stanton believed that women should not be forced to stay at home. A famous line of the Declaration of Sentiments is “We hold these truths to be self-evident that all men and women are created equal. . .”. This artifact demonstrates how Stanton advocated to have equal rights for women to vote (National Park Service, 2015).
  • National Park Service. (29 November 2015). Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Retrieved from
  • https://www.nps.gov/wori/learn/historyculture/elizabeth-cady-stanton.htm.
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Photograph of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony

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  • Library of Congress. (2017). Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. Retrieved from
  • http://www.americaslibrary.gov/aa/stanton/aa_stanton_friends_1.html
  • Malala was born on July 12, 1997 in Mingora, Pakistan. She grew up in Swat Valley, which is often called the “Switzerland of Asia.” Girls in Pakistan often do not have the same rights as boys do, especially in education, and in 2007 the Taliban took control over Swat Valley. The Taliban began banning things like playing music and girls going to school. Citizens who defy the Taliban’s orders faced harsh punishments including public execution. In spite of the Taliban, Malala continued to go to school and speaking out against the Taliban as a Women’s Rights, Children’s, and Education Activist. Due to her increased prominence both in Pakistan and around the world, the Taliban targeted Malala. On October 9, 2012 a masked gunman boarded Malala’s school bus and shot her in the head, neck, and shoulders. Malala survived the attack and continued to speak out against the Taliban and how women and children should have equal rights to education. Malala is currently enrolled at the University of Oxford, where she is studying philosophy, economics and politics.
  • I am Malala
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  • Yousafzai, Malala, 1997-author. (2013). I am Malala: the Girl Who Stood up for Education and was shot by the Taliban. New York, NY: Little Brown & Company.

Nobel Peace Prize

  • In October of 2014, at age seventeen Malala became the youngest person to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. She was awarded the Novel along with Indian Children’s Rights activist Kailash Satyarthi. Malala was awarded with the Nobel Peace Prize due to her struggle against the suppression of children and young people and for the right of all children to education. Despite being only seventeen, Malala has fought for most of her life for the right for girls to have equal access to education not only in Pakistan, but around the world. She has shown that young people can lead by example and improve their own situations, despite the dangerous circumstances they are placed in. This artifact is of her Nobel Diploma.
  • (2017). Nobel Media AB 2014. Retrieved November 19, 2017.
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United Nations Speech

  • On July 12, 2013, Malala made her first public appearance since the attack at the United Nations. She spoke on her sixteenth birthday. During her speech, Malala focused on the importance of education and women’s right, in this speech, she urged world leaders to change their policies. During her speech at the United Nations, Malala first said her now famous quote; “The extremists were, and they are, afraid of books and pens. The power of education frightens them. They are afraid of women… Let us pick up our books and pens. They are our most powerful weapons.”
  • Click the link for Malala’s speech:
  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gIG8nyhAdLQ
  • Pressnews TV. (2015, Nov. 5). Malala Yousafzai Full Speech at United Nations Youth Assembly: National News 2015 (video file). Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gIG8nyhAdLQ
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Million Man March

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“Creativity with Bill Moyers”

  • “Creativity with Bill Moyers” was a television show that aired in 1982. The show focused on exploring the lives and pasts of well known and influential individuals. Maya Angelou was featured for an episode in which the show’s hosts and camera crew returned to Stamps, AR with her, the town in which she grew up. This return to Stamps was rather emotional and difficult for Angelou considering all of the memories that the town holds for her, many unpleasant.
  • To watch an excerpt from the episode featuring Angelou, click here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5dSRIF8v_0s
  • Going Home With Maya Angelou Courtesy of Bill Moyers. (2014, December 01).
  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5dSRIF8v_0s
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“I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings”

  • “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings” was published in 1969. Angelou wrote it as an autobiography reflecting on her younger years. Marguerite Annie Johnson Angelou was born April 4, 1928 in St. Louis, MO. Her parents separated when she was young and from then on she was sent to lived with her grandmother in Stamps, AR. Growing up in the early-mid 1900’s, Angelou experienced the turmoil of racism first hand. Her family struggles continued as she was raped as a young girl by her mother’s boyfriend. After learning of this, her uncles killed the perpetrator which added to traumatic experience. The combination of all of the horrific events lead Maya to stop speaking for many years. She found her voice again eventually and went to San Francisco to study dance and acting. From the 1950’s-70’s her focus was on the success of her acting career. She performed on Broadway and received both a Tony and an Emmy Award nomination. Upon returning to the United States, after spending much of the 1960’s in Africa, Angelou helped start the Organization of Afro-American Unity. She served on two presidential committees, for Ford in 1975 and for Carter in 1977. In 2000, Angelou was awarded the National Medal of Arts by President Clinton. In 2010, she was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Obama. She was also awarded with an honorary doctoral degree. Maya Angelou is influential for her many efforts to bring about peace, equality, and social justice. These themes were often the focal points of her many written works including over 50 books, plays, poems, essays, etc.
  • Angelou, M., & Winfrey, O. (2015). I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings. New York:
  • Random House.
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Bibliographic References

  • Angelou, M., & Winfrey, O. (2015). I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings. New York: Random House.
  • Armbruster, S. (2006, April 7). Jane Addams Peace Garden statue unveiled. Retrieved November 21, 2017, from
  • http://www.fresnostatenews.com/2006/04/07/jane-addams-peace-garden-statue-unveiled/
  • Biography.com Editors. (2016, November 18). Maya Lin Biography.com (A&E Television Networks, Ed.). Retrieved
  • November 20, 2017, from https://www.biography.com/people/maya-lin-37259
  • Caged Bird Legacy. (n.d.). BIOGRAPHY. https://www.mayaangelou.com/biography/
  • Cotter, H. (2010, September 6). Always in Its Element, No Matter the Weather. Retrieved November 15, 2017, from
  • http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/07/arts/design/07storm.html.
  • Encyclopedia Britannica. (7 May 2017). Seneca Falls Convention: 1848.
  • Retrieved from https://www.britannica.com/event/Seneca-Falls-Convention#ref268475.
  • Fresno State. (2015, July 10). Retrieved November 21, 2017, from
  • http://www.fresnostate.edu/adminserv/arboretum/garcol/peacegarden.html
  • Friends of Women’s Rights National Historical Park (2017). Declaration of Sentiments.
  • Retrieved from http://www.womensrightsfriends.org/1848.php.
  • Going Home With Maya Angelou Courtesy of Bill Moyers. (2014, December 01).
  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5dSRIF8v_0s


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