Mhs school of Mission and Theology Phd program Approved by mhs research Committee, 16 September 2015 (fu-sak 44/15) Table of contents



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MHS School of Mission and Theology
PhD Program
Approved by MHS Research Committee, 16 September 2015 (FU-sak 44/15)

Table of contents


  1. Introduction to the PhD Program p. 1

  2. Structure of the PhD Program p. 4

  3. Form of the PhD Program p. 5

  4. Description of PhD courses p. 7




  1. Introduction to the PhD Program

The PhD progam of the MHS School of Mission and Theology is part of the school’s general focus on research:




  • that is characterized by high international standards;

  • that is able to move the research front within the school’s academic fields;

  • and that in particular relates to the global mission of the church and to encounters of religions and cultures.



  1. Accreditation

The MHS PhD Program is accredited by Norwegian educational authorities, with a “Forskrift”/“Regulations” as the key document: http://www.mhs.no/?380.




  1. Overall Aim

The aim of the PhD education at the MHS School of Mission and Theology (cf. “Forskrift”/“Regulations”, section 2):


“is to qualify candidates to conduct research of international quality and to perform other types of work requiring a high level of scientific expertise and analytical thinking in accordance with sound scientific practice and established standards on research ethics. The PhD education is to provide the candidate with knowledge, skills and expertise in keeping with the national qualifications framework.”



  1. Overall Learning Outcomes

The overall learning outcomes of the PhD education are connected with the European Qualifications Framework for Lifelong Learning (EQF) as well with the The Norwegian Qualifications Framework for Lifelong Learning (NQF; http://www.nokut.no/Documents/ NOKUT/Artikkelbibliotek/Norsk_utdanning/NKR/20140606_Norwegian_Qualifications_Framework.pdf). Having succesfully completed the PhD Program, the candidate is therefore expected to meet the following requirements:


  • Knowledge: The candidate

    • is in the forefront of knowledge within his/her academic field and masters the field´s philosophy of science and methods

    • can evaluate the expediency and application of different methods and processes in research and scholarly projects

    • can contribute to the development of new knowledge, new theories, methods, interpretations and forms of documentation in the field




  • Skills: The candidate

    • can formulate problems, plan and carry out research and scholarly work

    • can carry out research and scholarly work of a high international standard

    • can handle complex academic issues and challenge established knowledge and practice in the field




  • General competence: The candidate

    • can identify new relevant ethical issues and carry out his/her research with scholarly integrity

    • can manage complex interdisciplinary assignments and projects

    • can communicate research and development work through recognized Norwegian and international channels

    • can participate in debates in the field in international forums

    • can assess the need for, initiate and practice innovation



  1. Overall responsibility

The Board of the MHS has the overall responsibility for the PhD education and confers the PhD degree (cf. “Forskrift”/“Regulations”, section 3).


The research administration (Research Committee/PhD Coordinator) reports regularly to the Board:

The PhD degree is conferred by the Board on the basis of:




  • an approved doctoral thesis,

  • a completion of the required training Program,

  • an approved trial lecture on an assigned topic,

  • an approved public defence of the doctoral thesis.



  1. Structure of the PhD Program




Thesis (150 ECTS)


































Either: a monograph of 100.000 words

Or: a collection of 3-5 scholarly articles, with an introduction



PhD909








































Training (30-40 ECTS)





































Discipline- and thesis-related (10)

PhD908

  • sources

  • research front discipline and thesis

  • discipline- and thesis related courses/seminars



































































Theory/method: textual

analysis (5)



PhD905





Theory/method: hist.-systematic analysis (5)

PhD906





Theory/method: empirical

analysis (5)



PhD907




















or/and

or/and
























































































Scholarly socialization (5)

  • Participation in res. seminars (4)

  • Dissemination (1)

PhD903








University pedagogics (5)

PhD904






































































































































Basis I (5)

  • Start-up (2)

  • Res. ethics (2)

  • MHS profile (1)

PhD901








Basis II (5)

  • Philosophy of Science (4)

  • MHS profile (1)

PhD902
































































































































Training:



  • Minimum requirement is 30 ECTS, with the following compulsory courses: Basis I (5 ECTS), Basis II (5 ECTS), Scholarly socialization (5 ECTS), Theory/method according to project profile (5 ECTS), Discipline- and thesis-related (10 ECTS).

  • Optional/additional courses: University pedagogics (5 ECTS), and (in multidisciplinary projects) an additional course of Theory/method (5 ECTS).

  1. Form of the PhD Program

The PhD education normally consists of three years of full-time study or six years half time study. It includes:




  • A formalized training that covers general introduction to research/academic work as well as to the discipline and topic in which the thesis is to be written; the work load of the formalized training has a minimum of 30 ECTS credits,

  • An independent research project that is carried out under close academic supervision; this research project is expected to reflect a work load corresponding to 150 ECTS, and it is presented:

    • either as a monograph of approximately 100.000 words,

    • or as a collection of 3-5 scholarly articles that are published or accepted for publication in international journals with a high standing, and with an introduction relating the articles to each other and to the current research discourse.

To achieve this, the MHS PhD Program has the following organization:




  1. Supervision

The PhD candidate has one main academic supervisor. The main supervisor should be appointed at the time of admission. In projects with a clear interdisciplinary profile, there should also be a co-supervisor, so that the supervisors together cover the thematic and methodological fields of the project. The main supervisor has the primary academic-related responsibility for the candidate. If the MHS appoints an external main supervisor, a co-supervisor from the MHS must also be appointed. Co-supervisors are experts in the field who provide supervision and share the academic-related responsibility for the candidate with the main supervisor.




  1. PhD school

The formalized training of the PhD Program is organized as a PhD school, offering intensive course weeks as well as research seminars.


Intensive course weeks
Each semester (in September/October and in February/March), the MHS organizes an intensive course week. The aim of these course weeks is to give an overall opportunity for PhD candidates to complete the requirements of the training program, and PhD candidates are expected to participate in two course weeks during their project period. Each course week—including reading/writing before and after—gives the opportunity to complete two 5-credits courses.

  • Course structure:

    • Pre-course work: read the curriculum of the course (300-400 pp.) and write a 500 words note in relation to the thesis project.

    • Course week: lectures and group work, 14 hours/two days.

    • Post-course work: write a 3.000 words essay in relation to the thesis project, based on the curriculum and lectures.

  • Annual cycle:

    • Course week in fall semester: PhD901 (Basis I) and PhD902 (Basis II).

    • Course week in spring semester: each of the theory/method courses, PhD905, PhD906, and PhD907.

    • In both course weeks: a one day PhD seminar, PhD903.


PhD seminars
Each semester, the MHS organizes two PhD seminars, some times with a lecture in addition to project presentations, other times project presentations only.


  • Each PhD candidate is expected:

    • to participate with a presentation in at least one PhD seminar per year during the project period;

    • to being the respondent to the presentation of one of the other PhD candidates twice during the project period.

  • Annual cycle:

    • two of the PhD seminars are organized as part of the intensive course weeks;

    • the two other PhD seminars are organized in other parts of the semester.


External courses and seminars
Participation in external courses and seminars—or a research school that is co-organized by the MHS—may replace corresponding parts of MHS’ Program, provided acceptance and follow-up by the supervisor.


  1. Residence policy

MHS has a pragmatic policy with regard to the question of residence, and a decision about residence requirements is made in each individual case. Key criteria are satisfactory solutions with regard to supervision and library services, and satisfactory solutions with regard to participation in active research environments.




  1. Description of PhD courses



Course description

PhD901 Basis I: Start-up, research ethics, MHS profile

Credits: 5 ECTS

Term: fall

Course code: PhD901

Language of instruction: English

Approved: FU-sak 44/15
MHS School of Mission and Theology

Course coordinator: Knut Holter

Introduction:
The course aims at giving the PhD candidate a general introduction to what it means to do a PhD in the context of the MHS, focusing particularly on:


  • Start-up (2 ECTS): the structure of the MHS PhD Program, the art of writing academic text, the use of bibliographical management tools and library resources.

  • Research ethics (2 ECTS): general issues as well as issues in relation to the projects of the individual course participants.

  • Profile of the MHS (1 ECTS): the global mission of the church, encounters of religions and cultures in global contexts.


Learning outcomes:
Knowledge: Having successfully completed the course, the candidate:


  • has a thorough understanding of information literacy, and of requirements and characteristics of doing PhD research;

  • is familiar with current research ethical discourses of doing PhD research and with the structure and profile of the MHS PhD Program.

Skills: Having successfully completed the course, the candidate:




  • masters the bibliographical management tools and library resources that are relevant for the PhD project;

  • is able to critically assess the research ethical challenges of the PhD project in relation to current discourses.


Organization and work methods:
Offered as a combination of lectures and pre- and post-course work:


  • 14 lectures as part of an intensive course week of the PhD school.

  • Pre-course work: read the curriculum of the course and write a 500 words note in relation to the thesis project.

  • Post-course work: write a 3.000 words essay in relation to the thesis project, based on the curriculum and lectures.

  • Expected workload: in total 140 hours.


Assessment:


  • Approved participation, by course coordinator

  • Approved essay, by course coordinator


Evaluation:
As part of the MHS Quality System, the course is regularly evaluated.
Literature:
Articles on research ethics related to the projects of the course participants (50-100 pp.).

Bosch, D.: Transforming Mission: Paradigm Shifts in Theology of Mission. Maryknoll, NY: Orbis, 1991 (excerpts 100 pp.).



Guidelines for Research Ethics in the Social Sciences, Law and the Humanities. Publ. by NESH, National Committees for Research Ethics in Norway, Oslo 2006. Online access: https://www.etikkom.no/globalassets/documents/english-publications/guidelines-for-research-ethics-in-the-social-sciences-law-and-the-humanities-2006.pdf, (30 pp.).

Nygaard, L.P.: Writing for Scholars: A Practical Guide to Making Sense and Being Heard. Los Angeles/Oslo: Sage/Universitetsforlaget, 2015, 2nd edition (180 pp.).



Course description

PhD902 Basis II: Philosophy of Science, MHS profile
Credits: 5 ECTS

Term: fall

Course code: PhD902

Language of instruction: English

Approved: FU-sak 44/15
MHS School of Mission and Theology

Course coordinator: Anna Rebecca Solevåg

Introduction:
The course aims at giving the PhD candidate a thorough introduction to relevant discourses in contemporary science of philosophy, focusing particularly on:


  • General lines in contemporary philosophy of science, with particular attention to the humanities and social sciences.

  • Theology as an academic discipline in relation to contemporary trends in the philosophy of science.

  • Profile of the MHS: hermeneutical concerns reflecting the current interpretive context of the global mission of the church, and of encounters of religions and cultures in global contexts.


Learning outcomes:
Knowledge: Having successfully completed the course, the candidate:


  • is familiar with general lines in contemporary Philosophy of Science, with particular attention to the humanities and social sciences;

  • has a thorough understanding of theological perspectives on contemporary trends in the Philosophy of Science and hermeneutical concerns reflecting the current interpretive context of the global mission of the church, and of encounters of religions and cultures in global contexts.

Skills: Having successfully completed the course, the candidate:




  • can formulate research problems and projects in relation to general lines in contemporary philosophy of science;

  • is able to critically assess research problems and projects in relation to relevant theological perspectives and hermeneutical concerns.


Organization and work methods:
Offered as a combination of lectures and pre- and post-course work:


  • 14 lectures as part of an intensive course week of the PhD school.

  • Pre-course work: read the curriculum of the course and write a 500 words note in relation to the thesis project.

  • Post-course work: write a 3.000 words essay in relation to the thesis project, based on the curriculum and lectures.

  • Expected workload: in total 140 hours.


Assessment:


  • Approved participation, by course coordinator

  • Approved essay, by course coordinator


Evaluation:
As part of the MHS Quality System, the course is regularly evaluated.
Literature:

Drønen, Tomas Sundnes. 2009. “Communicating Freedom or Colonial Evangelism?” In Communication and Conversion in Northern Cameroon: The Dii people and Norwegian Missionaries, 1934-60. Leiden: Brill, pp. 1-29.


Drønen, Tomas Sundnes. 2006. “Scientific Revolution and Religious Conversion – A Closer Look at Thomas Kuhn’s Theory of Paradigm-Shift”, Method and Theory in the Study of Religion, vol. 18, 3/2006: 232-254.
“Feminist Epistemology and Philosophy of Science” from Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Revised Aug. 5, 2015. http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/feminism-epistemology/
Vähäkangas, Mika. 2010. “The Future of Missiologies”. In Walk Humbly with the Lord. Church and Mission Engaging Plurality, eds. Viggo Mortensen and Andreas Østerlund Nielsen. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans Publishing, pp. 217-229.
van den Brink, Gijsbert: Philosophy of Science for Theologians: An Introduction. Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2009 (Contributions to Philosophical Theology, 12), 300 pp.
Walls, Andrew. 1997. “Structural Problems in Mission Studies”. In The Missionary Movement in Christian History. Studies in the Transmission of Faith. Maryknoll, NY: Orbis Books, pp. 143-159.


Course description

PhD903 Scholarly socialization
Credits: 5 ECTS

Term: fall

Course code: PhD903

Language of instruction: English

Approved: FU-sak 44/15
MHS School of Mission and Theology

Course coordinator: Anna Rebecca Solevåg

Introduction:
Being a PhD candidate means a gradual socialization into the discipline/s and scholarly guild/s of theme an2d thesis. In addition to the individual supervision, the PhD candidate is therefore expected to participate in an active research community with seminar presentations, response to seminar presentations, and popularization of research. Supervisor and candidate should accordingly plan the how, when and where of this scholarly socialization, and the MHS facilitates a broad range of meeting points of the research community:


  • Regular PhD seminars organized by MHS.

  • Research schools and research groups/clusters (co-)organized by MHS/supervisor.

  • External conferences, courses, workshops, etc.


Learning outcomes:
Knowledge: Having successfully completed the requirements, the candidate:


  • has a thorough understanding of how the scholarly guild comes together and creates and develops scholarly discourses in seminars, conferences, etc.;

  • has a thorough understanding of the challenges and necessities of scholarly popularization.

Skills: Having successfully completed the requirements, the candidate:




  • can present papers in a research context;

  • can formulate relevant critique to papers presented in a research context;

  • can popularize research results and perspectives in a context of non-specialists.


Organization:
Offered as a continuous series of PhD seminars:


  • Seminar participation (4 ECTS): The candidate is expected to participate with one project presentation per year in the MHS PhD seminar throughout the project period. This participation may be replaced by participation in an external context, provided acceptance and follow-up by supervisor. The candidate is also expected to being respondent to the presentation of one of the other PhD candidates, at least twice during the project period.

  • Dissemination (1 ECTS): Popularization of research, e.g. through a lecture or an essay in a newspaper or popular journal. Organized by candidate and supervisor in each case.

  • Expected workload: in total 140 hours.


Assessment:


  • Approved participation in a research context, by course coordinator

  • Approved popularization of research, by course coordinator


Evaluation:
As part of the MHS Quality System, the course is regularly evaluated.


Course description

PhD904 University pedagogics
Credits: 5 ECTS

Term: fall

Course code: PhD904

Language of instruction: Norwegian

Approved: UU-sak 44/15
MHS School of Mission and Theology

Course coordinator: Tomas Sundnes Drønen


Introduksjon:
Kurset skal bidra til å skape refleksjon rundt egen pedagogisk praksis for stipendiater og nyansatte lærere ved Misjonshøgskolen. Deltakerne skal tilegne seg ny kunnskap og nye ferdigheter relatert til planlegging, gjennomføring og evaluering av undervisning. Deltagerne skal få innsikt i forskjellige vurderingsformer og veiledning av studenter, og kurset har også fokus på digitalisering av utdanningen.
Læringsutbytte:
Kunnskap: Studenten skal etter å ha gjennomført dette emnet:


  • kunne beskrive og forklare hvordan studenter lærer og hvordan man kan tilrettelegge for studenters læring

  • kunne vurdere og anvende ulike undervisningsmetoder for å øke studiekvaliteten i egen undervisning

  • kunne bruke ulike undervisningsformer og reflektere over hvordan disse kan bidra til økt læringsutbytte

Ferdigheter: Studenten skal etter å ha gjennomført dette emnet:




  • kunne planlegge og gjennomføre gode undervisningsforløp

  • kunne utvikle relevante vurderingsformer og reflektere over hvilke konsekvenser disse kan ha for studenters læring

  • kunne bruke ulike veiledningsstrategier i skiftende veiledningssituasjoner

  • kunne bruke digitale redskaper i undervisningen og kunne tilrettelegge for en fleksibel undervisning


Organisering og arbeidsformer:

Kurset organiseres med fire samlinger hvor innholdet er en kombinasjon av forelesning, diskusjon og gruppearbeid. For å få godkjent kurset forutsettes at deltagerne er med på alle de fire samlingene. Deltakerne skal også delta i observasjon av undervisning og kollegaveiledning, samt levere tre praktiske og teoretiske mappeinnleveringer. Arbeidene påbegynnes på samlingene. Forventet total arbeidsinnsats er 150 timer.


Obligatorisk arbeidskrav:



  • Deltagelse på fire samlinger

  • Observasjon av undervisning


Vurderingsformer:


  1. Refleksjonsnotat hvor filmen Teaching Teaching & Understanding Understanding kommenteres og diskuteres med valgfrie elementer fra pensumlitteraturen (1500 ord +/- 10 %).

  2. En IKT-produksjon som er en 10 minutters videoforelesning eller en nettpresentasjon.

  3. Logg fra gjennomført undervisning med kollegaveiledning (1000 ord +/- 10 %).

Alle vurderingsformer: Bestått/ikke bestått


Krav til forkunnskap:

Mastergrad eller tilsvarende.


Kvalitetssikringssystem:

Som et ledd i kvalitetssikringssystemet blir emnet regelmessig evaluert.


Litteratur:

Film

Teaching Teaching & Understanding Understanding (1-3) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iMZA80XpP6Y&index=1&list=PLUvh8nBV_eO9ma_DggZiSGLnKb9hBZ5yO
Bøker:

Strømsø, Helge I., Kirsten Holmegård og Per Lauvås (red.). 2006. Når læring er det viktigste: undervisning i høyere utdanning. Oslo: Cappelen akademisk forlag. (250 s.)



Artikler:

Gynnild, Vidar. “Kvalitetssystemet i praksis: Ressurser på avveie?” Uniped nr. 3 (2014), 4-22. http://www.idunn.no/uniped/2014/03 (19 s.)

Herrebrøden, Henrik. “Tester og testtilbakemeldinger som direkte bidragsytere til dypere læring blant studenter.” Uniped nr. 4 (2014), 3-18. http://www.idunn.no/uniped/2014/04 (16 s.)

Rye, Johan Fredrik. “Konsistente karakterer?” ?” Uniped nr. 2 (2014), 63-77. http://www.idunn.no/uniped/2014/03 (15 s.)

Rynning, Marjo. “Kan våre studenter lære mer hvis vi forteller dem mindre?” Uniped nr. 2 (2014), 49-62. http://www.idunn.no/uniped/2014/03 (14 s.)

Sagbakken, Mette og Maria Theresa Konow-Lund. “Å bære lykten eller være følgesvenn?” Uniped nr. 4 (2014), 32-45. http://www.idunn.no/uniped/2014/04 (14 s.)

Skaar, Øystein Olav og Rune Johan Krumsvik. “Multimedia discrepancies – plenary lectures as perceived by students.” Uniped nr. 1 (2015), 53-73. http://www.idunn.no/uniped/2015/01 (21 s.)

Strømsø, Helge I. “’Klikkere’ i forelesningen: bidrar det til læring eller er det bare morsomt?” Uniped nr. 2 (2014), 20-32. http://www.idunn.no/uniped/2014/02 (13 s.)

Taraldrud, Karen Eg. “Problembasert læring og casestudier i juristutdanningens innledende år.” ?” Uniped nr. 2 (2014), 93-101. http://www.idunn.no/uniped/2014/03 (9 s.)
Totalt 371 sider


Course description

PhD905 Theory/method: Textual analysis
Credits: 5 ECTS

Term: spring

Course code: PhD905

Language of instruction: English

Approved: FU-sak 44/15
MHS School of Mission and Theology

Course coordinator: Jostein Ådna

Introduction:
The course aims at giving PhD candidates working with classical texts (Biblical texts, but also Patristic texts and corresponding texts from other religious traditions) a thorough introduction to relevant discourses in contemporary textual studies, focusing particularly on:


  • Historical perspectives: potentials and challenges of reading the texts as historical artifacts.

  • Hermeneutical perspectives: potentials and challenges of reading the texts from contemporary experiences and concerns.


Learning outcomes:
Knowledge: Having successfully completed the course, the candidate:


  • is in the forefront of knowledge within textual studies and masters its practical and theoretical challenges;

  • can evaluate the historical and hermeneutical perspectives of current textual discourses, and is able to develop new insights in the field.

Skills: Having successfully completed the course, the candidate:




  • can formulate problems in the field of textual studies, in dialogue with current discourses;

  • can plan and carry out research of a high international standard, challenging established knowledge and practice in the field.


Organization and work methods:
Offered as a combination of lectures and pre- and post-course work:


  • 14 lectures as part of an intensive course week of the PhD school.

  • Pre-course work: read the curriculum of the course and write a 500 words note in relation to the thesis project.

  • Post-course work: write a 3.000 words essay in relation to the thesis project, based on the curriculum and lectures.

  • Expected workload: in total 140 hours.


Assessment:


  • Approved participation, by course coordinator

  • Approved essay, by course coordinator


Evaluation:
As part of the MHS Quality System, the course is regularly evaluated.
Literature:
McKenzie, Steven L. & Stephen R. Haynes (eds.): To Each its own Meaning: An Introduction to Biblical Criticisms and Their Application. Louisville: Westminster, 1999 (Revised and expanded version), pp. 17-121, 125-180, 201-252, 268-282.

McKenzie, Steven L. & John Kaltner (eds.): New Meanings for Ancient Texts: Recent Approaches to Biblical Criticisms and Their Applications. Louisville: Westminster, 2013, pp. 1-37, 97-136, 155-176.

Oeming, Manfred: Contemporary Biblical Hermeneutics: An Introduction. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2006, pp. 1-147.

In cases of projects analyzing other classical texts than the Bible (e.g. Patristic texts, or corresponding texts from other religious traditions), parts of the literature may be replaced by other.


Course description

PhD906 Theory/method: Historical-systematic analysis
Credits: 5 ECTS

Term: spring

Course code: PhD906

Language of instruction: English

Approved: FU-sak 44/15
MHS School of Mission and Theology

Course coordinator: Knut Alfsvåg

Introduction:
The course aims at giving the PhD candidate an introduction to relevant discourses in historical and systematic theology, focusing particularly on:


  • General lines in current historiographical discourses, with particular attention to the history of the church.

  • General lines in current systematic-theological discourses, with particular attention to current hermeneutics.


Learning outcomes:
Knowledge: Having successfully completed the course, the candidate:


  • understands the significance of textual studies for research projects in historical and systematic theology;

  • has a good knowledge of the history and current discussion in hermeneutics.

Skills: Having successfully completed the course, the candidate:




  • knows the tools and methods of research in historical and systematic theology;

  • can evaluate the methodological and hermeneutical presuppositions of current research in these areas;

  • can develop and critically assess independent research projects.


Organization and work methods:
Offered as a combination of lectures and pre- and post-course work:


  • 14 lectures as part of an intensive course week of the PhD school.

  • Pre-course work: read the curriculum of the course and write a 500 words note in relation to the thesis project.

  • Post-course work: write a 3.000 words essay in relation to the thesis project, based on the curriculum and lectures.

  • Expected workload: in total 140 hours.


Assessment:


  • Approved participation, by course coordinator

  • Approved essay, by course coordinator


Evaluation:
As part of the MHS Quality System, the course is regularly evaluated.
Literature:
Bradley, James E.: Church History: An Introduction to Research, Reference Works and Methods.  Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1995, selection, 230 pp.

Jasper, David.: A Short Introduction to Hermeneutics. Louisville: Westminster John Knox Press, 2004, 148 pp.

Thiselton, Anthony. Hermeneutics: An Introduction. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2009, selection, 424 pp.


Course description

PhD907 Theory/method: Empirical analysis (5 ECTS)
Credits: 5 ECTS

Term: spring

Course code: PhD907

Language of instruction: English

Approved: FU-sak 44/15
MHS School of Mission and Theology

Course coordinator: Marianne Skjortnes

Introduction:
The aim of this course is to introduce the PhD candidate to theoretical and practical approaches to qualitative research methods. The main aim of the theoretical introduction is to help the candidate reflect upon situatedness and through basic communication theory to understand the role the researcher plays in relational social processes. The aim of the practical approach is to give a presentation of practical skills related to preparation for fieldwork, interviews, and participant observation. 
The main challenge of interpretative social sciences is to understand social processes and intercultural and relational interaction. This course will thus focus on philosophical considerations related to deconstruction and reconstruction of ‘self' and ‘other' in order to make the PhD candidate consider the data collection and fieldwork situation as a crossroads between researcher and respondents where negotiation and construction are important keywords. Different theoretical approaches related to gender, communicative competence, embodiment and ritual practices will also be part of the course.
Learning outcomes:
Knowledge: Having successfully completed the course, the candidate:


  • has knowledge of different theoretical approaches to qualitative research methods;

  • has knowledge about the different roles of the researcher in the field, including relations to the respondents and to “gatekeepers”;

  • has knowledge about “situatedness”, meaning those processes in which the researcher him/herself influence the field under study.

Skills: Having successfully completed the course, the candidate:




  • is able to prepare a fieldwork, both in terms of practical matters and in terms of preparing interview/observation-guides;

  • is able to formulate research and interview questions;

  • is able to analyze data and understand the complex relationship between empirical findings and theory;

  • is able to conduct fieldwork according to the ethical guidelines presented during the course.


Organization and work methods:
Offered as a combination of lectures and pre- and post-course work:


  • 14 lectures as part of an intensive course week of the PhD school.

  • Pre-course work: read the curriculum of the course and write a 500 words note in relation to the thesis project.

  • Post-course work: write a 3.000 words essay in relation to the thesis project, based on the curriculum and lectures.

  • Expected workload: in total 140 hours.


Assessment:


  • Approved participation, by course coordinator

  • Approved essay, by course coordinator


Evaluation:
As part of the MHS Quality System, the course is regularly evaluated.
Literature:
Briggs, Charles L. Learning How to Ask: a Sociolinguistic Appraisal of the Role of the Interview in Social Science Research. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1986.

 Charmaz, Kathy. Constructing grounded theory: a practical guide through qualitative analysis. London: Sage, 2006.

 Drønen, Tomas Sundnes. "Anthropological Historical Research in Africa - How Do We Ask?" History in Africa 33, 2006: 137-153.

Fontana, Andrea & Frey, James. "The Interview: From Structured Questions to Negotiated Text." In Handbook of Qualitative Research, ed. Denzin, Norman K. & Lincoln, Yvonna S. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 2000.

 Lakoff, George & Johnson, Mark. Metaphors We Live by. 2nd ed. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2003.

 Madriz, Esther. "Focus Groups in Feminist Research." In Handbook of Qualitative Research, ed. Denzin, Norman K. & Lincoln, Yvonna S. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 2000.

 Silverman, David. Doing Qualitative Research: a Practical Handbook. London: Sage, 2005.

Vansina, Jan. Oral Tradition as History. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press, 1985.



Optional Reading:

Aase, Tor Halfdan & Fossåskaret, Erik. Skapte virkeligheter: kvalitativt orientert metode. Oslo: Universitetsforlaget, 2014.



Course description

PhD908 Discipline and thesis related coursework
Credits: 10 ECTS

Course code: PhD908

Language of instruction: English/Norwegian

Approved: FU-sak 44/15
MHS School of Mission and Theology

Course coordinator: thesis supervisor

Introduction:
The previous courses have gradually moved from a general research training (cf. Basis I and II) to a more thesis oriented focus (cf. Theory/method), and this gradual specialization is further developed in the present part of the training program. Supervisor and candidate will here attend to and prepare for the thematic and disciplinary focus of the thesis, and in this way build a bridge from coursework to thesis, particularly focusing on:


  • General aspects of the discipline: sources and research history

  • More particular aspects of the thesis topic: research situation and methodological/ hermeneutical challenges and concerns.


Learning outcomes:
Knowledge: Having successfully completed the course, the candidate:


  • is in the forefront of knowledge with regard to thematic focus and methodological/ hermeneutical approach of the particular research project;

  • can evaluate alternative approaches, and can contribute to the development of new theory and knowledge.

Skills: Having successfully completed the course, the candidate:




  • can formulate problems and start doing research of a high international standard;

  • can handle complex issues related to the research project and challenge established knowledge and practice in the field.


Organization and work methods:
It is up to the supervisor and candidate to construct this part of the training program, and they report about plans and implementation in their semiannual reports to the PhD Coordinator and Research Committee. The implementation will normally include some of the following genres:


  • Active participation in a disciplinary and/or thematic seminar/workshop/conference closely related to the thesis.

  • Oral exam based on a reading list related to the discipline and/or thematic focus and/or method and/or hermeneutics of the thesis.

  • Writing an essay related to the discipline and/or thematic focus and/or method and/or hermeneutics of the thesis.

  • Expected workload: in total 280 hours.


Assessment:


  • Approved by supervisor.



Evaluation:
As part of the MHS Quality System, the course is regularly evaluated.


Course description

PhD909: Thesis
Credits: 150 ECTS

Course code: PhD909

Language of instruction: English

Approved: FU-sak 44/15
MHS School of Mission and Theology

Course coordinator: PhD Coordinator / thesis supervisor

Introduction:
The PhD thesis is the final result of the PhD training. The thesis should be an independent research project that meets international standards with regard to ethical requirements, academic level and methodology used in the research field. The thesis should contribute to the development of new knowledge and achieve a level meriting publication or public disclosure in a suitable format as part of research-based knowledge development in the field.
The thesis is presented:
Either as a monograph of approximately 100.000 words.
Or as a collection of 3-5 scholarly articles + introduction/cloak, following these criteria:

  • The collection must contain at least three individual but thematically related articles that are connected with an introductory “cloak” of about 50-100 pages.

  • If the candidate is not the principal author of all articles, the thesis must consist of at least four articles of which the candidate is principal author of two.

  • If the articles are written in cooperation with others, the candiate’s independent input must be documented by a signed declaration from the co-author(s).

  • The candidate must be the sole author of the Introduction/cloak.

  • The cloak must show how the articles fit together, so that the thesis clearly appears as a unified whole. The thesis’ contribution to the field of research must be made clear.

  • At least one article must be published or accepted for publication in a journal of high international standing before the thesis is submitted.


Learning outcomes:


  • Knowledge: Having successfully completed the thesis, the candidate is in the forefront of knowledge within his/her field of study, and has contributed to the development of new knowledge in this field.

  • Skills: Having successfully completed the thesis, the candidate is able to carry out research work of a high international standard.

  • General competence: Having successfully completed the thesis, the candidate can manage complex assignments and projects and identify new relevant ethical issues.


Organization and work methods:
The training is organized through individual and—when relevant—group supervision. The PhD candidate will have one main academic supervisor. In projects with a clear interdisciplinary profile, there should also be a co-supervisor, so that the supervisors together cover the thematic and methodological fields of the project.
The responsibilities of the candidate:


  • to present reports or thesis text to the supervisor on a regular basis;

  • to participate regularly in PhD seminars, presenting project surveys or thesis texts annually;

  • to follow the research ethical standards of the discipline;

  • and to report to MHS semiannually.

The responsibilities of the supervisor:




  • to follow up the candidate’s academic development, and to stay informed of the progress of the candidate’s work and to assess it in relation to the progress plan in the project description;

  • to follow up academic-related factors that may cause a delay in the candidate’s progress so that the candidate can complete the training within the stipulated time period;

  • to give advice on formulating and delimiting the thematic area and research questions, to discuss and assess hypotheses and methodology, to discuss the results and the interpretation of these, to discuss the structure and implementation of the thesis, including the outline, choice of language, documentation, etc., and to provide guidance on the academic literature and data available in libraries, archives, etc.;

  • to advise the candidate on the issue of research ethics related to the thesis;

  • and to report to MHS semiannually.


Assessment:


  • Semi-annual reports from candidate and supervisor provides the Research Committee/PhD Coordinator with the most immediate data. In cases of delay and/or other problems, the Research Committee/PhD Coordinator follow up vis-à-vis candidate and supervisor.

  • A midterm evaluation responds to the academic status and progress of the PhD research project and provides feedback to candidate and supervisor and Research Committee/PhD Coordinator. In cases of delay and/or other problems, Research Committee/PhD Coordinator follows up vis-à-vis candidate and supervisor.

  • When the thesis is completed and the required coursework has been approved, the candidate submits the thesis to the MHS, requesting that it can be defended for the PhD degree. The MHS then appoints an evaluation committee; cf. Regulations for the PhD degree at MHS, sections 13 and 14, cf. http://www.mhs.no/?380.


Evaluation:
As part of the MHS Quality System, the organizing and outcome of the program are regularly evaluated.



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