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Honors Biology

(Two semesters, ½ credit per semester, 10, 11, 12)

Prerequisite: CPE
Honors Biology is designed for students to develop a comprehensive understanding of the concepts of biology and an appreciation of science as a process. Connections within biology, between biology and other fields, and practical applications of biology will be examined. Themes and concepts are emphasized in class and laboratory including the life of the cell, cellular reproduction and genetics, evolutions, biological diversity, animals, plants, and ecology. This course is a prerequisite for AP Biology.
Fee: $15.00

Advanced Placement Biology
(Two semesters, ½ credit per semester, 10, 11, 12)

Prerequisite: Honors Biology, Honors Chemistry or Chemistry (concurrently)


AP Biology is designed to be the equivalent of a first year college introductory biology course. Themes and concepts are emphasized in class and laboratory including science as a process, evolution, energy transfer, continuity and change, relationship of structure and function, regulation, interdependence in nature, and science, technology, and society.
Fee: 1/3 of AP Exam plus $15.00 Supply
Chemistry
(Two semesters, ½ credit per semester, 10, 11, 12)

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment or credit Math 10, CPE or equivalent


Chemistry is designed to provide a foundation for further studies in the sciences through problem solving, critical thinking and hands‑on lab experience. The course covers topics including the metric system, density, atomic structure, the mole concept, gases, nuclear chemistry, elec­trons, the periodic table naming compounds, bonding, acids/bases and chemical reactions. This course is highly recommended for any student planning on attending college.
Fee: $15.00
Honors Chemistry
(Two semesters, ½ credit per semester, 10, 11, 12) Prerequisite: CPE or equivalent and Math 10
Honors Chemistry is designed to develop studies in the sci­ences through problem solving, critical thinking and hands‑on lab experience. Themes and concepts include the metric system, Atomic struc­ture, mole concept, Nuclear chemistry, electrons, the periodic table, naming compounds, solutions and bonding, acids/bases, chemical reac­tions, equilibrium and organic chemistry. This course is a prerequisite for AP Chemistry.
Fee: $15.00
Advanced Placement

Chemistry
(Two semesters, ½ credit per semester)

Prerequisite: Honors Chemistry and concurrent Pre-Calculus or Honors Pre-Calculus.


The AP Chemistry course in high school is designed to be the equivalent of a first year college chemistry course. Themes and concepts include thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibrium, and electrochem­istry. Problem‑solving, critical thinking and laboratory work are all part of the AP curriculum.
Fee: 1/3 of AP Exam plus $15.00 Supply

CPE Science

(Chemical, Physical, Earth)


(Two semesters, ½ credit per semester, 9)
This physical science course combines topics from Physics, Chemistry, and Earth/Space Science. The objective of the course is to offer students the basic science necessary to understand the physical world and prepare them, both in theory and through acquisition of laboratory skills, for success in high level science courses. Students will study the physical and chemical properties of matter, atomic structure, chemical bonding, and the Periodic Table of Elements. In the second semester, topics in Physics will include motion, forces, conservation and transformation of energy, and wave behavior (sound and light). In Earth/Space Science, students will trace the historical development of theories relating to the nature and origin of the universe.
Fee: $15.00
Physics
(Two semesters, ½ credit per semester, 11, 12)

Prerequisite: Chemistry and Math 10


Physics is an upper level lecture/lab course which incorporates a qualitative and quantitative analysis of the physical world. In addition to the skills of doing science acquired in earlier science courses, the nature of the course demands a comfortable working knowledge of algebra and trigonometry. Topics covered in Physics include linear motion, forces and Newton's laws, two dimensional motion (projectile, circular, and rotational), simple harmonic motion, momentum and collisions, work and energy, thermodynamics, wave motion (sound and light), and electricity. Students will be asked to apply knowledge of these content areas to several "design and construct" projects throughout the year.
Fee: $15.00

Advanced Placement Physics B

(Two semesters, ½ credit per semester) Prerequisites: Chemistry concurrent enrollment or credit in Pre‑Calculus


The AP Physics B course is a one‑year non­calculus survey course encompassing me­chanics, electricity and magnetism, waves and optics, heat and thermodynamics, and modern physics. The course emphasizes the basic principles of problem solving in Physics. In addition, laboratory experiences will be incorporated to provide students the opportunity to observe and measure real phenomena, to critically examine and analyze data, and draw inference from what they observe. The laboratory experience allows students to examine nature as it is rather than in the idealized format presented in texts and problems.
Fee: 1/3 of AP Exam plus $15.00 Supply

Environmental Science
(Two semesters, ½ credit per semester, 10, 11, 12)

Prerequisite: 1 credit of science


The study of Environmental Science is in­terdisciplinary. The course is designed to examine and appreciate the natural biologi­cal and physical processes that operate in the world. Because it is a broad area of study, students should have one science credit before enrolling in this course. The knowledge and skills acquired over the freshman and sophomore years will be ap­plied to situations in this course. The suc­cessful student brings to this course skills in observation and analysis, a healthy respect for the earth, a willingness to challenge accepted beliefs, a competent level of tech­nological ability, and well developed re­search skills. This course seeks to create a body of knowledge from observable facts, representing the very essence of science.
Fee: $15.00
Geology
(Two semesters, ½ credit per semester, 10, 11, 12)

Prerequisite: 1 credit of science


This course deals with both physical and historical aspects of geology. The first topic deals with the structure of the earth as a planet, using longitude, latitude and topographic maps. A thorough study is done on the identification of minerals. Using that knowledge, the students then study the rock cycle and the different groups of rocks. Rocks are then identified and classified into one of the major groups. Next geomorphic processes are investi­gated (those forces responsible for shap­ing the earth) including: volcanism; earth­quakes; glacial activities, the effect of wind, the effect of ground water, the sculpturing effect of weather and erosion, the earth's movements relating to shoreline development. A section of earth history is studied which includes: the geologic time table, the development of the North American continent, and a study of fossils.
Fee: $15.00

IB Chemistry, IB Physics,

IB Biology
Students can enroll in an IB science course as a certificate (non-diploma) student. Please see page 48 for the course descriptions and requirements.
Social Studies
Social Studies Courses

Social Studies 9 World History 1607-1919 Psychology Required for Graduation

and Current World Problems Advanced Placement Psychology 1 credit U.S. History

Social Studies 10 U.S. History & Global Sociology 1 credit Gr. 12 Social Studies

Affairs: 1877-Present Applied Economics 1 credit Additional Social

Social Studies 12 U.S. Government IB History of the Americas Studies Credit

Advanced Placement U.S. History Modern World Issues

Advanced Placement Microeconomics/

Macroeconomics

Advanced Placement U.S. Government

and Politics
The objective of this program is to help the students enjoy, understand and learn materials from the social studies field. This is done in order to accomplish the ultimate goal of preparing and encouraging students to take their place in American and world societies as active, constructive individuals.

History – Students use materials drawn from the diversity of human experience to analyze and interpret significant events, patterns and themes in the history of Ohio, the United States and the world.
People in Societies - Students use knowledge of perspective practices and products of cultural, ethnic and social groups to analyze the impact of their commonality and diversity within local, national, regional and global settings.
Geography - Students use knowledge of geographic locations, patterns and processes to show the interrelationship between the physical environment and human activity, and to explain the interactions that occur in an increasingly interdependent world.
Economics - Students use economic reasoning skills and knowledge of major economic concepts, issues and systems in order to make informed choices as produces, consumers, savers, investors, workers and citizens in an interdependent world.
Government - Students use knowledge of the purposes, structures and processes of political systems at the local, state, national and international levels to understand that people create systems of government as structures of power and authority to provide order, maintain stability and promote general welfare.
Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities - Students use knowledge of the rights and responsibilities of citizenship in order to examine and evaluate civic ideals and to participate in community life and the American democratic system.
Social Studies Skills and Methods - Students collect, organize, evaluate and synthesize information from multiple sources to draw logical conclusions. Students communicate this information using appropriate social studies terminology in oral, written or multimedia form and apply what they have learned to societal issues in simulated or real-world settings.

Social Studies 9 World History 1607-1919 and Current World Problems
(Two semesters, ½ credit per semester)

Prerequisite: None


While the ninth grade focuses on world history beyond America’s borders for the time period of 1607 through 1919, American history will also be explored from a global perspective when American history intersects with world history. These years begin with the establishment of England’s first permanent colony in North America and proceed through World War I and the Russian Revolution. The course will then jump to the present to study current world geography and global issues that have developed since 1980. While preparing students for the 10th Grade OGT in Social Studies, this course will enrich their understanding of world history through a cooperative, activity-based approach featuring a year-long Model United Nations structure.

Social Studies 10 U.S. History & Global Affairs: 1877 - Present
(Two semesters, ½ credit per semester)

Prerequisite: None


The tenth grade focuses on the history of the United States beginning with the end of Reconstruction in 1877 and continuing through the present day. The course examines the political, economic, and social development of the American people. The study of American history is conducted in the context of world events. Additional emphasis is directed toward the development of the skills and knowledge necessary for successful achievement on the Ohio Graduation Test (OGT).

Social Studies Electives

Grade 11, 12
Students may select from the following electives:

Psychology

AP Psychology

Sociology

Applied Economics

AP Economics

Cultural Geography

History in Film

Personal History:

The Extraordinary History

of Ordinary People

Social Studies 12

U.S. Government
(Two semesters, ½ credit per semester, 12)

Prerequisite: None


The major focus of social studies in the twelfth grade is to provide students with the opportunity to apply the skills and knowl­edge they have gained in grades Pre‑K through 11. The students will participate in projects that will provide them the opportu­nity to conduct academic research and to utilize the results of this research in consid­ering solutions to real problems or issues. As participatory citizens, they will attempt to get their solutions implemented. All branches of government and all levels of government are discussed.
Advanced Placement

U.S. History
(Two semesters, ½ credit per semester, 10, 11)

Prerequisite: 1) Successful completion of previous Social Studies and English courses with a B average or better.

2) Written recommendation of a previous Social Studies instructor.
This is a rigorous course analyzing events, places, people and themes in American History from colonization and settlement to the present. This is a college-level course that stresses critical thinking and analytical writing. Using a sophisticated college text, students will work with primary documents and engage in a variety of writing exercises on a regular basis. Students will research historical events and interpretations and prepare for the Advanced Placement exam in May; successful completion of the examination may earn a student college credit. This course is designed for the student with high ability and interest in the advanced study of history. Reading and writing are integral parts of the course. Students must be willing to devote extra time to the coursework.
Fee: 1/3 of AP Exam

$20.00 Study Guide

Advanced Placement Microeconomics/

Macroeconomics
(Two semesters, ½ credit per semester)

Prerequisite: High level of achievement in previous Social Studies courses is recommended.


AP Microeconomics/Macroeconomics consists of one semester of microeconomics and another of macroeco­nomics. Microeconomics is the study of how an individual firm makes decisions, while macroeconomics deals with how our country as a whole, or major parts, make economic decisions. The purpose of these is to give the student a thorough under­standing of the principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a whole. Economic growth, international economics, and the role of consumers and producers are studied in this course.
Fee: 1/3 of AP Exam

$20.00 Study Guide

Advanced Placement

U.S. Government and Politics
(Two semesters, ½ credit per semester, 12)

Prerequisite:


1) Successful completion of previous Social Studies and English courses with a B average or better.

2) Written recommendation of a previous Social Studies instructor.


The AP course in U.S. Government and Politics will give students an analytical perspective of government and politics in the United States. This course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific examples. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. politics. Students will become acquainted with a variety of theoretical perspectives and explanations for various behaviors and outcomes. As a college level course, AP Government requires a greater commitment on your part than a general class. A high rate of attendance and organization is essential for success. Students should expect to prepare thirty to sixty minutes per night during the week. Personal responsibility and the ability to critically think are course prerequisites. Multiple-choice tests and essay writing skills are emphasized.
Fee: 1/3 of AP Exam

$20.00 Study Guide
Psychology
(One semester, ½ credit, 11, 12) Prerequisite: None
This course provides the student with a basic understanding of human behavior. Principles of learning, perception, sensory experience, abnormal behavior, and moti­vation are explored in reference to basic research of the brain. This beginning course provides the students with a college level textbook, and students who apply them­selves to the study of this course will be well prepared for a first year psychology course offered at the college level.
Advanced Placement Psychology
(Two semesters, ½ credit per semester, 11, 12)

Prerequisite: 1) Successful completion of previous Social Studies and English courses with a B average or better. 2) Written recommendation of a previous Social Studies instructor.


AP Psychology is designed to provide a college level introduction to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings. Students are exposed to each of the major sub-fields within an introductory psychology course. The student in this course should be prepared for an average of one hour of preparation outside of class each evening and reading a college level text. Multiple-choice tests and essay writing skills are emphasized.
Fee: 1/3 of AP Exam

$20.00 Study Guide

Sociology
(One semester, ½ credit, 11, 12)

Prerequisite: None


Students will develop a college level under­standing of principles related to the disci­pline of sociology. Students will review cross‑cultural literature to further their un­derstanding of culture and society on a global level. Students will explore topics of social class, gender inequality, social insti­tutions, and social problems created by mass society, population growth and urban development.

Applied Economics
(One semester, ½ credit, 10, 11, 12)

Prerequisite: None


The primary objectives of the course will be the examination and exploration of the basic theories outlined in the Micro and Macro approach toward the teaching of Economics. Theories such as supply­ and demand will be studied as well as world trade and economic competition planet wide.

IB History of the Americas
Students can enroll in an IB history course as a certificate (non-diploma) student. Please see page 48 for the course descriptions and requirements.
Modern World Issues
What is the US role in the world? How should world governments respond to terrorism? What is the balance between industrialization and environmental protection? How should the world address climate change? What is an appropriate world response to conflict & famine in a sovereign nation?
Using a wide range of technology and media resources, this course will explore social, political, economic and cultural causes and effects of current world issues/problems. Students will utilize 21st century learning skills and a variety of cooperative, project-based learning activities to study and propose creative solutions to a variety of problems facing world governments.
Sample topics include: international responses to conflict & famine, balancing nationalism and minority rights, immigration, nuclear proliferation, terrorism, and environmental protection.


International Baccalaureate

IB students in the full Diploma Programme must enroll in at least three higher level (HL) courses and three standard level (SL) courses. One subject must be chosen from each of the six subject groups:


Group 1 Language A1

Group 2 Language B

Group 3 Individuals and Societies

Group 4 Experimental Sciences

Group 5 Mathematics

Group 6 Arts and Electives (Instead of a group six subject, a candidate may select any additional subject from groups 1-4.)


All IB Students must enroll in Theory of Knowledge and CAS.
Higher Level Courses Standard Level Courses

Language A1 French, German, Spanish

Biology Chemistry, Physics

History of the Americas Math SL I & II

Visual Arts Visual Arts

Music
Students not taking the full diploma programme will have the following options:


Group 6 subjects (Visual Arts, Music, Chemistry and Physics) and Global Languages (Language B) will be open to students who would like to pursue an IB certificate for those subjects. Students must meet the pre-requisites established for these courses. Certificate students must complete both internal and external assessments as established by IBO.
The Board of Education and the student/parent share the cost of the exam. The board currently pays 2/3 of the cost with the remaining 1/3 cost being paid by the student.


Language Al English (HL)

(IB 11 & 12)

(Four semesters, ½ credit per semester)

Prerequisite: English 9, English 10 (Honors level preferred)
This is a two-year pre-university course in literature, which encourages students to see literary works as products of art and their authors as craftsman whose methods of production can be analyzed in a variety of ways and on a number of levels. Students convey their analysis through oral and written exposition. The works studied are by British and world authors, both modern and classic, selected from the IB Prescribed Book List. All students must be participants in the IB Diploma Programme.

French, German,

Spanish (SL)

Language B


(Two semesters, ½ credit per semester, 12) Prerequisite: Levels I, II, III and IV credit. Grade of "C" or better is highly recom­mended.
The fundamental objective at this level is for students to achieve high ability in the four language skills therefore improving overall communication in the target language. Students should enter the IB level with a wide range of vocabulary and strong grammar skills in writing and speaking. Such effective communication involves the process of understanding how to express ideas clearly and convincingly, which demands a further awareness of target cultures. The aim is to equip students to use the target language spontaneously and appropriately in unfamiliar as well as familiar situations. Students will be exposed to a wide variety of materials and genres to help expand knowledge of target language and cultures.
Students will be assessed throughout the year according to IB standards in listening, speaking, reading and writing.
Students will sit for the oral portion of the exam in late winter and the written papers in spring as directed by the International Baccalaureate Organization.

History of the Americas (HL)
(Four semesters, ½ credit per semester)

Prerequisite: Social Studies 9, Social Studies 10 or (AP) U.S. History


This two‑year curriculum will be offered in the eleventh and twelfth grade and will integrate American, Canadian, and Latin American histories. The course is designed to promote an awareness and understand­ing of the countries in the Western Hemi­sphere through a two‑year sequence where students are introduced to the common ex­perience in the Americas through a com­parative analysis of cultural, political, so­cial, and economic issues. The junior year will study the Americas as our regional option from the wars of independence through reconstruction. The internal as­sessment will also be initiated in the elev­enth grade and compromise 25% of the student’s final grade. The senior year will focus on an analysis of the Western Hemi­sphere in the 20th century. Incorporated in this study will be topics related to the Inter­national Baccalaureate's 20th century World History topics: causes, practices and efforts of the War, the rise and rule of Single‑party states and the Cold War. One month of the senior year the student will look in‑depth at the prescribed topic, the Cold War, outside Europe 1960‑1979.

Biology (HL)
(Four semesters, ½ credit per semester)

Prerequisite: CPE Science, Chemistry (Honors level preferred)


The intent of the IB Biology (HL) program is for students to secure knowledge of a large body of facts and at the same time a broad general understanding of the subject. The student should be able to apply this general understanding as widely as possible.

There are four basic biological concepts that comprise Biology (HL). These themes include the following: 1) Structure and Function ‑ this is one of the most important in biology. It can be observed that structures permit functions in some organisms while at the same time limit functions in others. 2) Universality versus Diversity ‑ At the factual level it soon becomes obvious that molecules such as enzymes, amino acids, and nucleic acids are ubiquitous and so are processes and structures. However these universal fea­tures exist in a biological world of enor­mous variety and diversity. 3) Equilibrium within Systems ‑ Checks and balances exist both within living organisms and in ecosystems. The state of dynamic equilib­rium is essential for the continuity of life. 4) Evolution ‑ The concept of evolution draws together other themes. It can be regarded as unifying the other themes. It can be seen as change leading to diversity within ecosystems and this leads to adapta­tions of structure and function.

The advantage of these themes, or strands, is that students can study biology at differ­ing levels of complexity (hierarchies), be­ing able to make a range of explanations.
Student assessments will be conducted both internally and externally. External assessments account for 75% of the grade, while internal assessments are worth 25%. All students will complete a Group 4 project, which is a collaborative effort that shares concepts and theories from other disci­plines.
Goggles Required

Fee: Supply $15.00

Chemistry (SL)
(Two semesters, ½ credit per semester)

Prerequisite: CPE Science, Chemistry (Honors level preferred)


IB Standard Level Chemistry is an experimental science course that develops an understanding of traditional academic chemistry, as well as practical laboratory and investigational skills. Chemistry is called the central science as chemical principles underpin both the physical environment in which we live and all biological systems. Traditional topic areas include stoichiometry, atomic theory, bonding, kinetics, equilibrium, and acid-base chemistry. In addition, other topics may include environmental chemistry, biochemistry, and chemical industries. As part of the SL Chemistry course, students will satisfy the IB requirement for their Group 4 project by participating in an integrated/collaborative research effort.
Goggles Required

Fee: Supply $15.00
Physics (SL)
(Two semesters, ½ credit per semester)

Prerequisite: CPE Science, Chemistry (Honors level preferred)


IB Standard Level Physics is an experimen­tal science course that develops an under­standing of natural physical phenomena through both qualitative and quantitative means. The focus of Physics is the study of the interactions between matter and energy. Traditional topic areas include measure­ment, mechanics, thermodynamics, wave mechanics, electricity and magnetism, atomic physics and astrophysics. The course will blend a conceptual understanding with the theoretical and experimental processes that shape this scientific discipline. To fully develop students' comprehension of phys­ics, consideration will be given to the soci­etal and historical impact of the discipline. It is through these perspectives that students will acquire an appreciation for the interna­tional contributions to the development of science. As part of the SL Physics course, students will satisfy the IB requirement for their group 4 project by participating in an integrated/collaborative research effort.
Fee: Supply $15.00

Math SL I
(Two semesters, ½ credit per semester)

Prerequisite: Math 9, Math 10 (Honors level preferred)


This IB course provides an introduction to many topics typically covered in a Pre-cal­culus class. These include quadratic, loga­rithmic, exponential, and trigonometric functions, the Laws of Sines and Cosines, The Binomial Theorem, vectors, basic sta­tistics, and probability. A significant com­ponent of the class is the completion of IB portfolio items. It is a fast paced and chal­lenging course for students with a strong math background and skills. A graphing calculator is required.
Math SL II
(Two semesters, ½ credit per semester)

Prerequisite: Math 9, Math 10 (Honors level preferred)


This IB course completes the Math Meth­ods sequence by addressing topics typically covered in a Calculus class. These include: differentiation, integration, and review of Math I material. This is a difficult course solely for students with extremely strong math skills. A graphing calculator is required.
Visual Art
These prerequisites are for all the IB Visual Art courses: Visual Arts (SL) – Art I, II (preferred) or Art I and additional semester art course.
Each Visual Arts course consists of two linked compulsory parts, with many activities integrating work in studio with workbook research. In common to each course are core elements, which include the:

* Introduction to art concepts, criti­cism and analysis

* Acquisition of studio technical and media skills

* Relation of art to sociocultural and historical contexts.


The difference in the expectations at Higher Level (HL) and Standard Level (SL) is indicated by the difference in recommended total teaching times and the difference in emphasis on Studio Work and Research Workbooks by the balance between the time allocated to Part A and Part B.
Fee: Supply $50.00
Visual Art (HL)
(Four semesters, ½ credit per semester)
This is designed for the specialist visual arts student, with creative and imaginative abilities, who may pursue the visual arts at university or college level. The student will devote 168 hours to Studio Work, which encompasses practical exploration and artistic production. Seventy-two (72) more hours are devoted to a Research Workbook that will cover independent critical research and analysis, visual and written, in more than one culture.
Fee: Supply $50.00
Art (SL)

Option A (SLA)
(Two semesters, ½ credit per semester)
This is designed for the visual arts student with creative and imaginative abilities. The student will devote 105 hours to Studio Work, which encompasses practical ex­ploration and artistic production. Forty-five (45) more hours are devoted to a Re­search Workbook that will cover indepen­dent critical research and analysis, visual and written, in more than one culture.
Fee: Supply $50.00

Art (SL)

Option B (SLB)
(Two semesters, ½ credit per semester)
This is designed for the student whose interest in art is mainly critical, cultural and historical. These students will devote 45 hours to Studio Work with primary focus on practical exploration of artistic tech­niques. Option B students will devote 105 hours to the Research Workbook that will cover independent critical research and analysis, visual and written, in more than one culture.
Fee: Supply $50.00

Music (SL)
(Two semesters, ½ credit per semester, 11, 12)

Recommended: Music Appreciation (Per­spectives in Music) and Music Theory or equivalent (completion of theory workbook in summer).

Standard Level:

* Group Performance option (SLG) 150 hours


The primary focus of the IB Music course is to prepare students to successfully understand the material needed to pass the IB Music examinations. This course will encompass the external assessment components of IB, which include the study of a prescribed work for 2008 through 2010: Dido and Aeneas (Purcell) study of musical genres and styles, and the musical investigation.
This course is supplemental and accounts for 50% of the student's IB grade. The remaining 50% is based on group performance. All students will be in the group performance option, and they must be a member of a school performance ensemble (band, choir, or orchestra).
Students will analyze the prescribed work and other pieces using the assessment criteria: Aural Perception, Technical Language, Structural Analysis, and Context. Students will discuss characteristics of the composer's compositional style, historical background, genre, text, form, performance practices, etc. Musical compositions will include examples from different genres, style periods, and world music.
Musical Investigation: (Media script)
Each student will produce a written media script of no more than 2,000 words exploring the relationships between musical pieces from two identifiable and distinct musical cultures. Each musical culture must have one or more musical examples, should be something that the student will enjoy researching, and should engage the interest of the proposed audience.

Theory of Knowledge
(Two semesters, ¼ credit per semester, 11, 12)
What do we know? Why do we know it? How do we know it?
A student in Theory of Knowledge (TOK) will address these questions through adventurous, thoughtful and purposeful exploration into the different ways of knowing. The focus of TOK is the student, and the students’ abilities to analyze and think critically about the world around them. Students’ assumptions will be challenged in order to foster an appreciation for the quest for knowledge.
This course challenges the student to question the bases of knowledge, gain an awareness of subjective and ideological biases, develop the skills to analyze evidence as expressed in rational argument and engage in exploration of other perspectives. TOK is taught within the spirit of free inquiry using a primarily Socratic approach. TOK is not merely a course in philosophy, though students will have an introduction to classical and modern philosophy through a variety of discussions and readings, and will gain a working knowledge of different philosophical frameworks.
Moral Philosophy will be addressed in greater depth, as students will be challenged to address current issues of both national and global importance, such as: abortion, cloning and reproductive technologies, genetic research, euthanasia, assisted suicide and issues of medical choices, capital punishment, race (ethnicity) and eugenics, gender issues, sexual orientation, the allocation of medical resources, world hunger, poverty and the allocation of resources (including Genetically Modified Organisms), animal rights and other environmental issues.
Theory of Knowledge is the central element of the IB Diploma Programme. Thus, any student enrolled in the Diploma Programme must take TOK and complete all assessments. Assessments for all students include both oral and written work, including at least one essay of 1200-1600 words and one presentation given in class.
CAS
Creativity, Action, Service is known by its acronym and is a fundamental part of the IB diploma experience. The CAS requirement takes seriously the importance of life outside the world of scholarship, providing a counterbalance to the academic self-absorption some may feel within a demanding school curriculum. The creative, physical, and social development of human beings can be shaped by their own experiences. Participation in CAS encourages students to share their energies and special talents while developing awareness, concern and the ability to work cooperatively with others. The IB goal of educating the whole person and fostering a more compassionate and socially responsible attitude comes alive in an immediate way when students reach beyond themselves and their books.
CAS involves three essential elements. Cre­ativity is interpreted broadly to include a wide range of arts activities as well as the creativity students demonstrate in designing and implementing service projects. Action can include not only participation in individual and team sports but also taking part in expeditions and in local or international projects. Service encompasses a host of community and social service activities.
A minimum of 150 CAS hours must be com­pleted during the junior and senior years. A minimum of 50 hours must be completed for each element of CAS.

THE EXTENDED ESSAY
IB diploma candidates are required to under­take original research and write an extended essay of some 4,000 words. This aspect of the programme offers the opportunity to investigate a topic of special interest and to become acquainted with the kind of independent research and writing skills expected at the university level. A total of about 40 hours of private study and writing time is recommended. A student may choose to write on a topic in one of sixty subjects available in the IB diploma curriculum.


Mayfield Excel
Traditional Programs

Auto Mechanics I & II

Business Academy I & II

Computer-Aided Design/Drafting Engineering Technology I & II

Construction Management I & II

Construction Trades I & II

Cosmetology I & II

Culinary Arts I & II

Early Childhood Education I & II
Environmental Education Programs

Cleveland Botanical Gardens

Floriculture and Gardening Operations

Landscape and Turf Operations


Hospitality & Food Service Careers I & II
IT Academy Programs

Computers, Networking and Electronics Technology (CNET)

Information Technology and Programming I & II

Interactive Media I & II


Intervention Programs

Agriculture and Career Exploration (A.C.E)

Career-Based Intervention

Job Training


Medical Technologies I & II

Performing Arts Academy

Public Service Safety Academy

TV Broadcast & Video Production I & II

Visual Art & Design I & II

Traditional One‑Year Senior Co‑op Programs

Cooperative Business Internship

Marketing Technology

Medical Career Technologies

Teaching Professions


Aurora High School is a member of the Mayfield Excel Technical Education Career Consortium. Our students are eligible to attend vocational programs at the following area high schools: Beachwood, Chagrin Falls, Mayfield, Orange, Richmond Heights, Solon, South Euclid‑Lyndhurst, and West Geauga. Vocational credit is awarded at semester.
Please note: The course fee reflects an ESTIMATE that is subject to further review and evaluation. Its intended purpose is to illustrate the potential cost to the course enrollee and should not be considered FINAL.
What is Tech Prep?
Tech Prep builds partnerships between secondary and post‑secondary institutions, and education and business communities. It involves restructuring the curriculum to integrate academic and technical education and make learning more meaningful and relevant. It helps students move from high school to higher education more easily and prepares them for a better school‑to‑work transition. Tech Prep increases students' options by making them aware of opportunities in technical careers and associate degree programs. Summer internships are set up for students after senior year of high school and throughout community college enrollment with businesses and industries that directly relate to their training background completed.

Auto Mechanics I

(Brush High School)

College Tech Prep

Grade 11
3 credits

2 Lab, 1 Related

Prerequisite: Interview by the Instructor

Recommendations: GPA of 2.0 or higher. Passage of the OGT, Math: Alg.1 – C or better, 3 Science units for high school grad.; Chemistry & Physics, and attendance should be 95% for certificate of completion

Estimated Fee: $45.00

Recommended for: College Bound/Technical Education
The Auto Technology program is an ASE (Automotive Service Excellence) Certified Master two-year intensified program designed to prepare the student entering into the automotive world on an apprenticeship level. Areas studied include:


  • Brakes, Steering & Suspension, Electrical

  • Engine Performance

  • Air Conditioning

  • Engine Rebuild

Manual and Automatic Transmissions

Emphasis is also placed on the career options available in the automotive world, including parts manager, sales manager. Brush High School’s provision of equipment supplies and instructional materials is the same as or better than that

found in professional work facilities. The content of this technical program realistically reflects the requirements of the labor market. Each day the program will entail one period of related class, where book learning will enhance the practical experience in the lab, followed by two periods of lab, where theory lessons are applied.

Students can earn college credit through Tri-C for successfully completing the program.



Auto Mechanics II

(Brush High School)

College Tech Prep

Grade 12
3 credits

2 Lab, 1 Related

Prerequisite: Passage of Auto Tech 1

Estimated Fee: $85.00
Theory and lab continues in the senior year with trouble shooting contests and Early Placement as year-end goals. Students may be placed into the automotive field during the second half of the senior year, providing on-the-job experience while still in high school. Early job placement is dependent upon the student’s readiness as determined by the instructor. All students will be required to take the NATEF end of course test. Students can earn college credit through Tri-C for successfully completing the program.

Business Academy I & II

(Brush High School)

College Tech Prep

Grades 11 & 12
3 credits each year

2 Lab, 1 Related

Prerequisite: Interview by Instructor

Recommendations: Algebra 1 and Geometry with a “C” average, minimum GPA 2.0, recommend “Intro to Business” elective to be taken at home school prior to enrolling in this program. Passage of the OGT

Estimated Fee: $135.00

Recommended for College Bound/Technical Education
This comprehensive business program has been created to give students an awareness of four different areas of business. Students can begin their endeavor in their freshman year by taking business electives at their home schools. The major goal of this program is to give students a wide range of experiences in order to better prepare them for college, technical school or entry into the workforce. The course tracks offered to the students through the Academy are Finance, Entrepreneurship, Business Management, and Advertising. The Business Academy’s objectives are to enhance student’s skills for employment and prepare them for actual work experiences. Through the program, students will acquire knowledge of a viable business operation. The Course Content includes Spreadsheets & Databases, Economics, Personal Finance, Accounting, Microsoft Office, Business Law, Sales & Marketing Management, Professional Development, Presentation Graphics, and Advertising. Students can earn college credits through articulation agreements with Cuyahoga

Community College


CADD Engineering

Technology I

(Computer-Aided Design/Drafting)

(Lakeland Community College)

College Tech Prep

Grade 11
3 credits

2 Lab, 1 Related

Prerequisite: Interview by Instructor

Recommendation: GPA of 2.0 or better recommended, Algebra I and Geometry with a “C” or better.

Estimated Fee: $200.00

Recommended for COLLEGE BOUND high school students interested in any engineering field. Should have strong mathematics & science skills and an interest in how things are made or how things work with an interest in design and product invention.
CADD I, the first year of a two-year program offered at Lakeland Community College meets daily for lab and lecture activities. The program gives high school juniors interested in Science, Technology, Engineering, & Mathematics (STEM) careers a head start on mastering core concepts and techniques critical to success in these areas. CADD, a College Tech Prep program, stresses academic/scholastic achievement, problem-based technical skill development, and work ethics principles critical to success beyond high school. Foundational knowledge such as engineering vocabulary, principles, practices, and techniques form the basis for interactive daily lessons. Competencies include mechanical, manufacturing, electronic and fluid topics such as 2D & 3D design, assembly drawings, product simulation, stress analysis, computer numerical control, metallurgy, current, resistance, voltage, circuits, and pneumatics; as well as areas of Architectural and Civil such as residential and commercial floor plans, elevations, and renderings. Students use cutting-edge software and tools in daily class activities and competitions for key exposure to engineering fields for the future. Specific software program selections may vary, but will include AutoCAD, Solidworks and Master CAM applications.

CADD Engineering Technology II

(Computer-Aided Design/Drafting)

College Tech Prep

(Lakeland Community College)

Grade 12
3 credits

2 Lab, 1 Related

Prerequisite: CADD I.

Estimated Fee: $200.00

Recommended for: College Bound/Technical Education

CADD II, a continuation of the CADD I program, it builds on previously learned concepts and principles. Emphasis is placed on developing specialization(s) within engineering areas of interest. Instructor will assume more of a facilitating role working one on one with each student. Students will be involved in independent learning activities based on individual interest, and competitions. Students may also have the opportunity to intern during second semester. New concepts and techniques will be exposed based on student interest, pace of CADD I, and outside involvement and/or need(s) of corporations, colleges, and the community.

Construction Management I & II

(Lakeland Community College)

College Tech Prep

Grade 11 & 12
3 credits each year

2 Lab, 1 Related

Prerequisite: Interview by the Instructor and the Lakeland staff.

Recommendations: Student must have passed all areas of the OGT, GPA of 2.0 or higher, and a “C” average or higher in Alg.1 and Geometry.

Estimated Fee: $200.00 per year.


The Construction Management College Tech Prep program is a high school and college career path linked to business, industry and labor that insures a specified seamless pathway from high school to college to careers in Construction Management. The program combines two years of secondary education with two years of post-secondary education in a non-duplicative, sequential course of study. It provides technical assistance preparation in a career field such as engineering technology, mechanical, industrial or practical art of the trade and applied business practices. The program is designed to provide a broad survey of multiple construction technology fields; introduce the technical competencies of the construction management area; prepare the student for advanced studies and training in a specific construction apprenticeship program; reinforce common elements and introduce more advanced skills in a construction management field at the post-secondary level. Students will be required to take the NCCER end of course test.


Construction Trades

I & II

(Mayfield High School)
3 credits each year

2 Lab, 1 Related

Prerequisite: Interview by Instructor.

Recommendations: Good attendance and discipline records.

Estimated Fee: $200.00.per year.


The Construction Trades program will prepare students to enter the workforce or to continue education at the post-secondary level. Students will learn basic skills in safety and in the following trade areas: masonry, gutters, siding, roofing, plumbing, electricity, painting, carpentry, dry wall, floor coverings, and wall-papering. The second year will provide placement/apprenticeship opportunities. Students would work a minimum of 15 hours per week, and must provide their own transportation. Students will be required to take the NCCER end of course test.

Cooperative Business Internship

(Solon High School)

Grade 12
4 credits/ year

2 Related, 2 Work

Estimated Fee: $50.00

Are you interested in obtaining office-related work experience while attending school in your senior year? Maybe you would like to search for the “right” career now, even before going on to college. Here is an opportunity to earn while you learn! The program includes on-the-job training and related in-school instruction. The teacher/coordinator will assist the student in securing a job-training site. No previous work experience is needed. Students attend school in the morning and work in the afternoon. They are required to work a minimum of 20 hours per week and receive competitive wages. In addition, they must provide their own transportation to and from work.
The related class is only offered first period (7:30-8:45 a.m.) at Solon High School. In-class instruction includes: The Microsoft Office, beginning a job search, how to prepare for the job interview, budgeting, banking, online career research, applying for credit, preparing income tax records as well as individual units on personality development for the workplace.

Club activities are an integral part of the instructional program. Students are expected to participate in breakfast meetings, fundraising events and skill competitions sponsored by Business Professionals of America.



Cosmetology I

(Mayfield High School)

Grade 11
5 credits

1 Theory, 2 Lab, 1 Eng.3,

1 Anatomy/Chemistry

Prerequisite: Interview by Instructor

Recommendations: 2.0 min. overall GPA, good disciplinary and attendance record– 90% attendance record is required to take State test.

Be sure to read all requirements of the Cosmetology II program before committing to this program.

Estimated Fee: $450.00 Fee includes student kit/books (All fees must be paid prior to the first day of school or student will not receive their kit) recommended for: Technical Education/College Bound or strong interest in massotherapy, fashion design, and medical skin care. Students must be on track for graduation credit-wise. If the student fails the English 3 or Chemistry class, the students must take and pass the class in summer school to continue in the Cosmetology II program. If the student fails the Cosmetology I Lab or Theory, they will not be able to advance to the Cosmetology II program.


The lab training consists of learning manipulative skills such as hair cutting, hair styling, hair tinting, permanent waving, blower styling, hot iron styling, manicuring, and facials. Early in the program, students practice on mannequins. As they progress in skills and hours of instruction, they may practice on customers. Students take Anatomy/Chemistry and English to provide the information required to understand the concepts from such a wide range of fields. These include the theory of anatomy; physiology; histology of the skin, scalp, hair, and nails; cosmetic chemistry; bacteriology; sterilization and sanitation safety; salesmanship; salon management and communication skills. In addition, students study disorders of the skin, scalp, hair and nails. All areas covered in English, Anatomy/Chemistry, Theory and Lab will be part of the State Board of Cosmetology Exam. These courses must be passed to be eligible to take the State Exam.

Cosmetology II

(Mayfield High School)

Grade 12
5 credits

1 Theory, 2 Lab, 1 Related,

1 Eng.4, 150 Internship hours required to meet State Board Criteria. (* Students must be able to provide their own transportation to and from the Internship)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Cosmetology I Estimated Fee: $320.00



(All fees must be paid prior to the first day of school)

Attendance – 90% is required to take State Board Test

Recommended for: Technical Education/College Bound or strong interest in massotherapy, fashion design, and medical skin care.
The Cosmetology II course is designed to assist the student in developing specific skills and scientific knowledge to become a cosmetologist. The major part of the cosmetologist’s education is devoted to developing and mastering essential specific manipulative skills.

These competencies include applying chemical preparations to beautify the skin, hair and nails, as well as the principles of hair design and the techniques of altering the hair structure to create various styling effects. The students operate a professional customer clinic. Business management provides the student with the principles needed to plan and operate a salon as a successful business. The course is also designed for the student to develop such qualities as responsibility, courtesy, leadership, quality workmanship, and the development of desirable personality traits. A math course must be taken during either the junior or senior year at the home school. In order to be eligible to take the State exam, students must pass junior and senior English, junior chemistry, and both years of lab and theory, and participate in 150 hours of Internship after school under the supervision of a managing cosmetology licensee. The internship is one managing cosmetology licensee per student placement. All appropriate forms must be completed prior to the start of the Internship. The student must be in good standing in the cosmetology program before they are given permission by the cosmetology instructor to participate in the Internship program. Students must also meet the attendance requirements.

Upon successfully passing the exam State Board of Cosmetology, the student will be licensed to work in a salon.


Culinary Arts I

(Beachwood High School)

College Tech Prep

Grade 11
4 credits

2 Lab, 1 Related,

1 Culinary Science

Prerequisite: Interview by Instructor

Estimated Fee: $200.00

Recommended for: College Bound/Culinary Art Schools


The purpose of this program is to offer training in food related occupations to high school juniors showing interest and aptitude for the food service industry. The first year of this two-year sequence consists of a supervised in-school laboratory experience and related instruction. The students will develop basic skills in food preparation, service and sanitation. They will learn the basic skills of large quantity food preparation, proper use and care of materials and equipment, compliance with state and local sanitary codes, organizational structure, job descriptions, planning, production, ornamentation, catering and dining service. Culinary Arts I also focuses on Serve Safe Training and Certification. Successful completion of this training may be applied toward college requirements.

This certification program is an industry standard.




Culinary Arts II

(Beachwood High School)

College Tech Prep

Grade 12
5 credits

1 Culinary II Related,

1 Culinary Math,

3 Internship

Prerequisite: Culinary Arts I

Estimated Fee: $90.00

Recommended for: College Bound/Culinary Art Schools


This program meets for

1-1/2hrs. daily. Students drive or take a bus directly to Beachwood in the morning and return to their home school for the remainder of the school day.

The work-study component requires the students to work in the food industry for 15 hours per week to receive credit and earnings. The Culinary Arts II program teaches culinary math, restaurant business management and marketing techniques. Topics such as: employability skills, menu planning & design, cost extension/markup, restaurant design and equipment analysis are addressed.

The Culinary Arts II curriculum explores careers in the food industry (not just careers in restaurants!). Through guest speakers from the industry, field trips, job shadowing and research projects, the students will learn that the food industry offers many diverse career opportunities.





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