Message from the Principal



Download 0.61 Mb.
Page6/9
Date19.12.2018
Size0.61 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9
Creative Cooking

(One semester, ½ credit, 11, 12)

Prerequisite: Culinary Arts I and II
Creative Cooking is designed for the student who enjoys entertaining at home with family and friends while showcasing newly developed skills and current culinary trends.
This course will focus upon the fundamentals of the professional culinary industry while expanding the student’s knowledge of nutrition, consumer skills, food shopping and preparation on any budget, and meal planning. The student will also learn to create exciting menus and manage time plans to create these meals in a lab environment. Creative techniques, presentation formats, entertaining tips, special table settings, theme meals, and specialty foods will be studied and prepared.
The student will have opportunities to demonstrate newly acquired skills and knowledge by preparing and serving meals for special events for Aurora High School. Special activities will include guest speakers and field trips.

This is an excellent course for the student who wishes to enhance his/her culinary skills and desire a career in the food industry. A service learning project will be completed.


Fee: $40.00

Fashion Merchandising
(One Semester, ½ credit, 11, 12)
Students will learn the latest technologies in the field of fashion apparel and marketing. The course includes the study of design, historical influences, fashion designing, merchandising, promotional strategies and career opportunities. Students will study wardrobe planning and textiles. Students will have the chance to design a creation of their own. Students will do a market survey and observations. Students will study the different fibers and learn how to care for these fibers and textiles. Students will have a chance to work with silk, paint on silk and tie-dye. There will be field trips to Kent State Fashion Museum and to local retailers. Guest speakers will provide up-to-date information on the fashion industry and more.
Students will be responsible for supplies and materials required for this course.

International Cuisine
(One semester, ½ credit, 11, 12)

Prerequisite: Culinary Arts I and II


International Cuisine is designed for the student who enjoys eating regional cuisines, which can be found throughout the United States, yet has no idea how to prepare them.
Units include researching and studying various cultures around the world and preparing foods typical of these cultures in a lab environment. Cuisines from Europe, Canada, Latin America, the Mediterranean countries, the Middle East, Africa, and Asia will be prepared.
American regional foods will also be researched, studied and prepared in a lab setting. A service learning project will also be completed.
This is an excellent course for students who wish to expand their repertoire of knowledge and culinary skills focusing upon regional and international cooking.
Fee: $40.00

Living on Your Own
(One semester, ½ credit, 10, 11, 12)
Living on Your Own is designed to prepare young adults for their roles as adult individuals in society. The student will learn to coordinate life, work and family while developing a life management plan. Units include: goal setting, financial and resource management, skills needed to secure and maintain employment, career planning, becoming a savvy consumer, budgeting, checking accounts, savings and investing, consumer credit, buying a new and/or a used car, selecting and preparing your first apartment, meal management and cooking, entertainment, wardrobe planning, care and maintenance and wellness.
Learning activities will include various projects, guest speakers, and field trips. A service learning project will be completed.



Global Language
Global Language Courses
French I, Spanish I

French II, Spanish II

French III, German III, Spanish III

French IV, German IV, Spanish IV

IB French, IB German, IB Spanish

AP Spanish Language


The Global Language program is based upon international and state standards for instruction of global languages, as well as on standards set by the AP College Board and International Baccalaureate Organization. Students will be taught how to become proficient in communicating in languages other than English. Our goals are also that the student will gain knowledge about and understanding of other cultures; will connect with other educational disciplines and acquire information; will develop insight into the nature of language and culture; and will participate in multilingual communities at home and around the world.
As immersion is the best method of language acquisition, the courses will be conducted in the target language. Students are advised to continue four years or more of one language rather than one or two years of several languages in order to attain true proficiency.



French I, Spanish I
(Two semesters, ½ credit per semester,

9, 10, 11, 12)

Prerequisite: None
Level I incorporates all four skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Students are introduced to the spoken language and will learn the language patterns and phonetics foundational to the target language. Idiomatic expressions, vocabulary, and language patterns will be presented and practiced.
The incorporation of music, culture, geography, current events and past history will enable the student to become immersed in the traditions of the target culture. Exposure to the language outside of the classroom is encouraged to reinforce communication skills learned in the classroom. Mastery of the fundamental skills learned in this level are necessary to progress to the next level.
Workbook Fee: $10.00

French II, Spanish II
(Two semesters, ½ credit per semester, 9, 10, 11, 12)

Prerequisite: Level I credit. Grade of "C" or better is highly recommended.


Level II students will continue to develop in the four skill areas of listening, speaking, reading and writing with the goal of increased proficiency in each target language. Most of the instruction will be delivered in the target language. Level II builds upon grammatical foundations presented in the introductory course. Materials from target cultures will again be incorporated at this level to further develop students' knowledge of and interest in all aspects of the target language.
Workbook Fee: $10.00

French III, German III,

Spanish III
(Two semesters, ½ credit per semester, 10, 11, 12)

Prerequisite: Levels I and II credit. Grade of "C" or better is highly recommended.


Level III continues to incorporate all four skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Students will exchange and gather information about past, present and future activities both orally and in writing. Length and complexity of work used and produced by students in all skills will be developed to prepare students for success at the next level. Authentic materials will be used to expand cultural studies, language proficiency and communication. Students are expected to use the target language to relate real and simulated events in the classroom
French IV, German IV,

Spanish IV
(Two semesters, ½ credit per semester, 11, 12)

Prerequisite: Levels I, II and III credit. Grade of "C" or better is highly recommended.


Level IV provides the student with the opportunity to put to extensive use all the skills acquired in the first three levels. Students are expected to speak in the target language at this level. Level IV emphasizes the initiation and fueling of discussion, debate and higher level writing exercises on historical, literary and current topics of the target cultures. Designated outcomes in listening, reading, writing and speaking must be met to ensure language proficiency leading to AP standards
Workbook Fee: $20.00
AP Spanish Language
(Two semesters, ½ credit per semester)

Prerequisite: Levels I, II, III and IV credit. Grade of "C" or better is highly recommended.


AP Spanish Language emphasizes the use of Spanish and knowledge of Hispanic culture for active communication helping students to achieve a high ability in the four language skills. Students should enter the AP level with a wide range of vocabulary and strong grammar skills in writing and speaking. The aim is to equip students to speak, comprehend, read and write the language spontaneously and appropriately in unfamiliar as well as familiar situations. Students will receive extensive practice with grammar, reading, speaking and composition in preparation for the AP exam.
Workbook Fee: $20.00

Exam Fee: 1/3 of AP Exam
IB French, IB German,

IB Spanish
Please see page 47 for the details regarding these courses.
Workbook Fee: $20.00

.


Industrial Technology
Industrial Technology
Engineering Computer Aided Drafting I

Engineering Computer Aided Drafting II

Architectural Computer Aided Drafting
The Industrial Technology program is designed to prepare students for a career path to an engineering related field. This career path may lead to a technical school or four‑year university and prepare students for careers in engineering, technology, teaching, consulting, architecture or construction.
The principles of drafting and design are explored through experiences and projects using both traditional and computer‑aided design techniques.


Engineering Computer

Aided Drafting I
(Two semesters, ½ credit per semester,

9, 10, 11, 12)

Prerequisite: None
Students will be introduced to the basics of computer aided drafting using Auto CAD 2002. Content includes orthographic shape descriptions, dimensioning techniques, pictorial, section, and assembly drawings.
This is a foundation course for students interested in investigations into architectural concepts, basic drafting and geometric design and illustration. Students interested in architecture, engineering and those interested in building and construction and/ or parts and products for industry should enroll. CAD applications are integrated throughout.
Students will participate in various types of real‑world, hands‑on projects and contests such as the Bridges and Magnetic Levitation and floor plan contests that combine academics, technology and careers.
Career speakers will visit the classroom.

Engineering Computer Aided

Drafting II
(One semester, ½ credit, 10, 11, 12)

Prerequisite: Engineering Computer Aided Drafting I


This course continues application of Auto CAD 2002 program. Students will learn advanced Auto CAD techniques and will explore solid shapes and wire‑frames.
The course will culminate in a major drawing project. A portfolio presentation is required. Students will present their final portfolio project to a variety of business and industry representatives. Panel and will serve as their final course evaluation.

Architectural Computer

Aided Drafting
(One semester, ½ credit, 10, 11, 12)
This is an Architectural Computer Assisted Design course for those students interested in architecture design. The course focuses on the primary considerations necessary to design and construct a house. Technical drawing background is required. Planning, design and layout are emphasized.
This course focuses on residential construction packages. Activities include plans, elevations, and modeling.
The course will culminate in the creation of a model construction using foam board as a building medium. Students' architectural plans and models will be presented to a variety of business and industry representatives.
Students will have an opportunity to connect with college students who are learning about the construction trade as a volunteer for Habitat for Humanity.
Career speaker visits and field trips are part of the course.



Information Technology
Information Technology Courses
Explorations of Information Technology

Computer Networking Fundamentals

Advanced Placement Computer Science A

Fundamentals of Computer Systems

Web Page Design

Web Page Design II





Explorations of Information Technology
(One semester, ½ credit, 9, 10, 11, 12) Prerequisite: None
This course will start students early in their high school careers with the introduction to both technology and IT careers. This course will incorporate a variety of different programs into one semester and serves as an introduction to the IT Department. Topics covered in this semester course include: Java Programming, Language, Computer Systems, Web Page Design, Microsoft Office and Career Exploration.
Computer Networking Fundamentals
(One semester, ½ credit, 10, 11, 12 )
From hubs and routers to servers and cables, Networking Fundamentals provides an introduction to the field of computer networking. Whether the goal is networking the computers in a home or office, Networking Fundamentals provides the intricate skills required to design, build, and maintain a professional network.
Advanced Placement

Computer Science A
(Two semesters, ½ credit per semester, 10, 11, 12)
This course emphasizes object-oriented computer programming methodology with a concentration on problem solving and algorithm development. It is designed to be the equivalent of a first-semester university-level course in Computer Science. The Java programming language is utilized to illustrate the computer science concepts dealt with in this course.
Each student is required to take the AP exam in May.
Fee: 1/3 of AP Exam

Fundamentals of Computer Systems
(Two semesters, ½ credit per semester, 10, 11, 12)

Prerequisite: Explorations of Information Technology


This course is an excellent foundation course in computer hardware and software. Students will learn hardware, operating systems, diagnostics, trouble-shooting, repair, upgrading, and career opportunities in this two semester, lab-based course. This hands-on course uses tools and diagnostic equipment used in the field.

Web Page Design
(One semester, ½ credit, 10, 11, 12)

Prerequisite: None


Students begin by exploring and applying HTML coding basics towards the creation of web design projects. The study of web design is furthered by having students explore the features of Macromedia Dreamweaver as a full-scale web design tool. Students will publish their own websites, utilizing graphics, hyperlinks, tables, frames, layers, templates, and style sheets.
Web Page Design II
(One semester, ½ credit, 10, 11, 12)

Prerequisite: Web Page Design


This course ensures mastery of the design strategies in the Web Design I class, and extends those technologies into the world of interactive and animated media, making for projects that are smartly designed and visually stimulating. Macromedia Flash, Freehand, Fireworks, and other technologies will be implemented towards the goal of meaningful and engaging design.

Interdisciplinary
Connections for Success Theory of Knowledge

Housing & Interior Design Yearbook

TV Production

Advanced TV Production





Connections for Success
(Two Semesters, 3 credits, 11, 12)

Prerequisite: Junior Standing


In this program, the student receives work experiences in an employing establishment. The makeup of the program is such that many different "unskilled" and "semi-skilled" or "operator‑level" occupations may offer work experience to the student. Students are required to be employed a minimum of 15 hours a week, and provide their own transportation.
Instruction in this class is under the super­vision of a teacher‑coordinator who in­structs the students in job and life related skills. This instruction is geared to the needs and interests of the individual. This in‑school instruction is aimed at helping the students become productive citizens and enabling them to continue their education as long as possible.
Housing & Interior Design
(One semester, ½ credit, 10, 11, 12)
This course is designed to teach students how to apply the basic principles and elements of design to transform one's personal space into a functional and pleasing envi­ronment, which reflects one's individual taste and expression. Topics studied will include: making housing decisions, archi­tectural styles, interior and exterior con­struction, floor plans, furniture styles, win­dow treatments, color schemes, textures, fabrics, home furnishings and equipment, decorating, and landscaping. Career opportunities for those wishing a career in housing or interior design will also be studied.
Projects will incorporate the above areas of study. Be ready to become an independent designer! Be prepared to also become a contributing member of a design team.
The student will be responsible for pur­chasing materials needed for interior design projects.
TV Production
(One semester, ½ credit)
The course provides students with practical experiences in developing television production skills in the operation of equipment, preparation of materials and the planning and implementation of television segments or programs that will be aired for school broadcasts via our in-house cable channels. Each student will write scripts and storyboards in various formats such as music programs, public service and school announcements, interview shows, news programs, sports, and television commercials. Students will develop delivery skills including interpretation, vocal projection, announcing, and cold copy reading. Careers in television broadcasting will also be explored.
Advanced TV Production
Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or better in Television Production
(One Semester, ½ credit)
Advanced TV Production is for those students who are interested in producing more in-depth video assignments than what were required in TV Production class. Students will produce a documentary and a short film. The class will also delve into analysis and criticism of film.

Theory of Knowledge
(One semester, ½ credit, 11, 12)
What do we know? Why do we know it? How do we know it?
A student in Theory of Knowledge (TOK) will address these questions through adventurous, thoughtful and purposeful exploration into the different ways of knowing. The focus of TOK is the student, and the students’ abilities to analyze and think critically about the world around them. Students’ assumptions will be challenged in order to foster an appreciation for the quest for knowledge.
This course challenges the student to question the bases of knowledge, gain an awareness of subjective and ideological biases, develop the skills to analyze evidence as expressed in rational argument and engage in exploration of other perspectives. TOK is taught within the spirit of free inquiry using a primarily Socratic approach. TOK is not merely a course in philosophy, though students will have an introduction to classical and modern philosophy through a variety of discussions and readings, and will gain a working knowledge of different philosophical frameworks.
Moral Philosophy will be addressed in greater depth, as students will be challenged to address current issues of both national and global importance, such as: abortion, cloning and reproductive technologies, genetic research, euthanasia, assisted suicide and issues of medical choices, capital punishment, race (ethnicity) and eugenics, gender issues, sexual orientation, the allocation of medical resources, world hunger, poverty and the allocation of resources (including Genetically Modified Organisms), animal rights and other environmental issues.
Students will read a variety of texts for different purposes, utilize the writing process, write for different purposes and different audiences and research self-selected or assigned topics.
Yearbook

(Two semesters, ½ credit per semester, 10, 11, 12)

Prerequisites: Typing or keyboarding ex­perience. Prior English grade of "C" or above is highly recommended.
*(This course is not accepted as a Fine Arts credit by Ohio colleges and universities.)
Yearbook is designed to acquaint the student with all aspects of yearbook production. Members are expected to sell ads, as well as yearbooks, to help finance the pub­lication. Layouts, cover design, body copy, and writing captions are just a few of the areas of involvement for the students.
We are seeking students who are hard­working and dedicated to the philosophy of developing a quality publication that is a credit to the school and graduating class.


Mathematics
Mathematics Courses



Math Concepts 1

Integrated Math 2

Math 11

Applied Mathematics

Integrated Math 1

Honors Integrated Math 2

Integrated Math 3

Statistics & Probability

Math Concepts 2



Honors Integrated Math 3

Honors Pre-Calculus



Advanced Placement Calculus

(AB Course)












Advanced Placement Statistics










IB Math I, II

The high school mathematics program is designed to reflect both the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Standards and the mandated State Department of Education's Course of Study. All topics addressed on the SAT & ACT are also included.


Course selection depends upon recommendations from the previous mathematics teacher, the students' requests, their parents' approval, and guidelines outlined in this document.
Students entering ninth grade have four options that reflect varying ability and achievement. Students who successfully completed Accelerated Math 8 should select Honors Integrated Math 2. Students who struggled in Accelerated Math 8 should select Integrated Math 2. Students who successfully completed Math 8 should select Integrated Math 1. Students who struggled in Math 8 should select Math Concepts 1.
Aurora High School’s math curriculum continues to reflect the increasing needs of college bound students, who should plan to take four years of high school mathematics. For students entering the high school prior to 2007, the standard college bound sequence consists of 1) Math 9, 2) Math 10, 3) Pre-Calculus, and 4) Statistics. For students entering the high school in 2007 or later, the standard college bound sequence consists of 1) Integrated Math 1, 2) Integrated Math 2, 3) Integrated Math 3, and 4) Integrated Math 4. [Please note that this sequence will still cover material typically contained in stand-alone Pre-Calculus and Statistics courses.]
Any variations from the above must be individually evaluated and approved by the department chairperson. Previous test results, grades in math classes, and long-range goals will be considered.
In courses that require a graphing calculator, instruction will refer to the TI Series (83+, 84+). A TI 89 is not recommended.



Math Concepts 1
(Two semesters, ½ credit per semester)
This course is for students who had diffi­culty meeting the challenges of Math 8. It covers a combination of Algebra and Ge­ometry topics, focusing heavily on the de­velopment of algebraic reasoning skills. Topics include: solving and graphing linear equations, data analysis, and a selection of Geometry topics. Emphasis is placed on preparation for the 10th Grade Ohio Graduation Test.


Integrated Math 1
(Two semesters, ½ credit per semester)
The Integrated Math 1 course includes integrated development of fundamental concepts and skills in algebra and functions, geometry and trigonometry, statistics and probability, and discrete mathematics. The topics covered include a blending of algebra, geometry and statistics embedded in real world settings. Students will be given the opportunity to work in groups and be exposed to technology.
Graphic calculator is required

Math Concepts 2
(Two semesters, ½ credit per semester)
This is the second course in the Math Concepts 1-2 (Math Concepts 9-10) sequence. It covers a combination of Algebra and Geometry topics, focusing heavily on the development of algebraic reasoning skills. Topics include: surface area and volume, appropriate function notation, linear and quadratic equations, systems of equations, and probability. Emphasis is placed on preparation for the Ohio Graduation Test. This course is for students who successfully completed Math Concepts 1.

Integrated Math 2
(Two semesters, ½ credit per semester)
The Integrated Math 2 curriculum features interwoven strands of algebra and functions, statistics and probability, geometry and trigonometry, and discrete mathematics. Students will be exploring mathematics both by algebraic methods and through the use of technology. The use of a TI 83+ or TI 84+ calculator is required.
Honors Integrated Math 2
The Honors Integrated Math 2 curriculum is a deeper and faster paced approach to the topics in Integrated Math 2. This course is for students who were successful in Honors Math 8 or showed superior ability in Integrated Math 1.
Math 11
(Two semesters, ½ credit per semester)

Prerequisite: Math Concepts 10 or Integrated Math 2


This course is for 11th graders who have completed either Math 10 or Math Concepts 10. Topics of study include a continuation of the Algebra and Geometry topics seen in previous courses. Some of these are: matrices, rational expressions, polynomial functions, conic sections, and complex numbers. Also included are topics such as probability, counting principles, and some statistics.
Each student should have a scientific calculator.
Integrated Math 3
(Two semesters, ½ credit per semester)

Prerequisite: Integrated Math 2 or Honors Integrated Math 2


The Integrated Math 3 curriculum further deepens students’ understanding of algebra, statistics and probability, geometry, and trigonometry. There is also a focus on polynomial, rational, and trigonometric functions. Students will work individually and in groups, and with and without technology to develop a strong grasp of these topics. A TI 83+ or 84+ graphing calculator is required.

Honors Integrated Math 3
The Honors Integrated Math 3 curriculum is a deeper and faster paced approach to the topics in Integrated Math 3. This course is for students who successfully completed Honors Integrated Math 2 or showed superior ability in Integrated Math 2.
Honors Pre-Calculus
(Two semesters, ½ credit per semester, 11, 12)

Prerequisite: Honors Math 10


In Honors Pre-Calculus, the student will model real‑world phenomena with a vari­ety of functions, explore trigonometric func­tions and their applications, solve a variety of problems involving trigonometry, and become proficient with the use of a graph­ing calculator as a tool for problem solving.
Some of the other major topics studied are: exponential and logarithmic functions, polar and parametric equations, vectors, and analytic geometry.
Students who plan to study calculus should take this course. A TI 83+ or 84+ graphing calculator is required.
Applied Mathematics
(Two semesters, ½ credit per semester)

Prerequisite: Approval of Principal


Applied Mathematics covers new, high school level content through workplace, business, and consumer contexts and ap­plications. Projects and real‑world appli­cations of mathematical concepts will be undertaken. A calculator is needed.
Statistics & Probability
(Two semesters, ½ credit per semester, 11, 12)

Prerequisite: Honors Math 10, Pre-Calculus or Honors Pre-Calculus


Statistics & Probability is the mathematics of collection, organization and interpretation of numerical data. Topics include permutations, combinations, binomial theorem, mathematical expectation, sampling methods, mean, median, standard deviation, correlation, coefficients, normal distribution, binomial distribution, graphs, and probability. A TI 83+ or 84+ graphing calculator is required.
Advanced Placement

Calculus (AB Course)
(Two semesters, ½ credit per semester, 12)

Prerequisite: Honors Pre-Calculus or IB Math SL I


AP Calculus is available to seniors who have successfully completed Honors Pre-Calculus. This course includes the study of functions, limits, differentiation and integration.
Applications and problem solving are in­cluded in all major topics.
Each student must have a TI 83+ or 84+ graphing calculator and each student is required to take the AP Exam in May.
Fee: 1/3 of AP Exam
Advanced Placement


Download 0.61 Mb.

Share with your friends:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9




The database is protected by copyright ©sckool.org 2020
send message

    Main page