Matt Barton, Sandra Valadez, Deanna Llanos Social Studies Unit



Download 69.11 Kb.
Date19.01.2019
Size69.11 Kb.
#75805

Matt Barton, Sandra Valadez, Deanna Llanos

Social Studies Unit

Dr. Mary Soto & Dr. Maria Sudduth

EDTE 570

California State University, Chico


Gold Rush Concept Map

Big Idea: Life in the Boom Town

Essential Question: What was life like during the California gold rush?

Enduring Understanding: Students will have an understanding of life in the times of the California gold Rush and its impact on California.
Road:


  • Literature from that time

  • Field trip to gold mines

  • Parents act like a character from the gold rush

  • Music lesson

  • Research a person that lived during that time

  • California Gold Rush

           4th Grade

          Boom Town


    Townhall meeting


Standard:

4.3 Students explain the economic, social, and political life in California from the establishment of the Bear Flag Republic through the Mexican-American War, the Gold Rush, and the granting of statehood.


2. Compare how and why people traveled to California and the routes they traveled (e.g., James Beckwourth, John Bidwell, John C. Fremont, Pio Pico).

3. Analyze the effects of the Gold Rush on settlements, daily life, politics, and the physi­cal environment (e.g., using biographies of John Sutter, Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo, Louise Clapp).



4. Study the lives of women who helped build early California (e.g., Biddy Mason).


­

Unit Rationale:
This will be a unit that will focus on the California Gold Rush, specifically focusing on the daily life of people who lived and settled in California during this era. The students will be able to demonstrate the content comprehension by the end of this unit through the use of various assessments. This unit will target multiple intellectual areas of learning. We will help foster this environment through many different teaching strategies such as, pair share, journaling, guided reading, posters, role playing, and direct instruction, as well as research.
This lesson will focus on the students understanding of the California Gold Rush. This unit will target the following content standards:
4.3 Students explain the economic, social, and political life in California from the

establishment of the Bear Flag Republic through the Mexican-American War, the

Gold Rush, and the granting of statehood.

2. Compare how and why people traveled to California and the routes they traveled

(e.g., James Beckwourth, John Bidwell, John C. Fremont, Pio Pico).

3. Analyze the effects of the Gold Rush on settlements, daily life, politics, and the physi­

cal environment (e.g., using biographies of John Sutter, Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo,

Louise Clapp).

4. Study the lives of women who helped build early California (e.g., Biddy Mason).

The students that we will be working with for this unit is a classroom of twenty-eight fourth grade students. There are fourteen male students and fourteen female students. Out of the twenty-eight students, fourteen of them are English Learners.
Throughout our lesson students will be able to understand, apply, and analyze information they acquire through the unit.  With understanding students will be able to interpret information and explain it in their own words. Through applying students will be able to use the information they have learned in their lessons to help them succeed in the Boom Town Lesson at the end of the unit. Students will analyze through Gold Rush Era Politics comparing the different cultures and techniques that affected the environment.
We are using constructivism throughout our unit by having students take control of their own learning. “First, constructivist teachers seek and value students' points of view. Knowing what students think about concepts helps teachers formulate classroom lessons and differentiate instruction on the basis of students' needs and interests” (Brooks). With journals used throughout the lessons students are able to write down their own ideas and questions to try and figure out what is going on. Students are able to express their own points of view by discussion and pair and share, which is valued in a constructivist classroom. We are also creating a lesson in which students are able to learn about different cultures during this era and how they coexisted, they will be able to relate this information to their own personal experiences by writing in their journals and comparing it to life now.  We chose to use journals because we understand that, “When (we) help ELLs make connections between the language of the text they’re reading and the language they’re using in their own writing, ELLs become more aware of how they can use this language to express their ideas in writing,” (Celic 95).

For our students who are English Learners and students with Special Needs, they will have the opportunity to draw pictures as well as writing sentences to practice their writing. They will also have the opportunity to discuss to other classmates with their ideas. Modifications for English Learners and students with Special Needs include strategic seating, peer support, visual representations for words and ideas. Another modification is pairing up our students, in which the “...partner will be a linguistic and academic support for the beginning ELLs… and continue developing higher-order thinking skills and content knowledge,” (Celic 33).  We want our students to succeed in the classroom and pairing up the students will give our ELs a chance to develop language with their partners.
Block Plans:


Preview

Focused-Learning

Closure/Extension

Lesson 1: (Deanna)

Introduction: Read various Books on Gold Rush- By the Great Horn Spoon! By: Sid Fleischman, Anisett Lundberg: American Diaries #3: California 1851 By: Kathleen Duey, Bandit's Moon By: Sid Fleischman, Ishi: Last of His Tribe By: Theodora Kroeber



Objective- After reading one of the various books in a group, students will explain the daily life during the California Gold Rush by writing in their journals or a visual poster presentation using at least three academic terms 

Lang. Obj.- Communicating in their groups and as a whole class. Through TPS and posters



Strategies: TPS- Sharing Journal entries with others, Journaling- Throughout their time reading the books, Guided Reading Questions- Guiding questions that will help students think beyond the box

ELD Standards:

10. Writing

Productive

b) Write clear and coherent summaries of texts and experiences using complete and concise sentences and key words (e.g., from notes or graphic organizers).

C. Productive

9. Expressing information and ideas in formal oral presentations on academic topics



Content Standard:

4.3 Students explain the economic, social, and political life in California from the establishment of the Bear Flag Republic through the Mexican-American War, the Gold Rush, and the granting of statehood.

3. Analyze the effects of the Gold Rush on settlements, daily life, politics, and the physical environment

Assessments: Journaling (Formative Assessment), Poster (Summative)



Lesson 2:

Objective: Students will be able to describe the environmental effects of gold mining by writing three concrete effects of the gold rush in California.

Lang. Obj.: Students will be able to use complete sentences with proper use of nouns/verbs when writing down the effects of the California gold rush on the environment.

ELD Standards:

A. Collaborative

1. Exchange information and ideas with others through oral collaborative discussions on a range of social and academic topics

C. Productive

9. Expressing information and ideas in formal oral presentations on academic topics

12. Selecting and applying varied and precise vocabulary and other language resources to effectively covey ideas



Content Standards:

Social Studies

4.3.3 Analyze the effects of the Gold Rush on settlements, daily life, politics, and the physical environment (e.g., using biographies of John Sutter, Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo, Louise Clapp).

 

Strategies:  KWL-what do you know about the environmental impact of mining in the times of the gold rush?, Think-Pair-Share,  scaffolding

 

Assessments: Journal write and class discussion  

Lesson 3: (Science Lab)


Objective- Students will be able to differentiate between different minerals.

ELD Standards:

A. Collaborative  

 1.  Exchanging information and ideas with others through oral collaborative discussions on a range of social and academic topics

C. Productive  

11. Supporting own opinions and evaluating others’ opinions in speaking and writing

Content Standard:

4.The properties of rocks and minerals reflect the processes that formed them. As a

basis for understanding this concept:

b. Students know how to identify common rock-forming minerals (including quartz, calcite, feldspar, mica, and hornblende) and ore minerals by using a table of

diagnostic properties.

Strategies: Hand On- through panning for gold and seeing real gold and pyrite. Cooperative learning groups- They will be placed in groups of 4-5 and students will work together to discuss different minerals.

Assessment: Students will be able to identify different minerals in different rocks such as pyrite and have a conversation with their cooperative learning groups

Lesson 4:

(Gold Mine Field Trip)

Objective: After the gold mine field trip, students will be able to list three highlights from the field trip writing a paragraph of their experience.


Lang. Obj.: Ask questions and list highlights

Strategies: Think-Pair-Share, Direct instruction



Content Standards:

Social Studies

4.3.3 Analyze the effects of the Gold Rush on settlements, daily life, politics, and the physical environment (e.g., using biographies of John Sutter, Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo, Louise Clapp).

Assessment: Students will write down three highlights from the trip and use the academic language learned from previous lessons.


Lesson 5:

Boomtown


Objective: After being a part of a pretend boomtown, students will be able to write about their experience from the point of view of an actual person living during the Gold Rush. They will then be able to connect these ideas with present day trends and situations.
Language Objective: Communicate with parent volunteers and fellow students, exchange “gold” for fake money, write about their experience
Assessment: A journal entry about their experience form the point of view of a person from the Gold Rush Era and then make connection to today’s world.



Individual Lesson Plans:
Deanna Llanos

BILINGUAL PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION PROGRAM

BASIC INSTRUCTIONAL MODEL (BIM)

A MULTIPLE STRATEGY LESSON PLAN GUIDE

 

The Basic Instructional Model (BIM) is a general format for planning lessons.  It includes the major components of good lesson plans.  It is a format adaptable to several instructional strategies.  Whether the teacher is intending to use a direct instruction strategy, discovery strategy, or other strategy, these are the components of an effective lesson plan.



 

CANDIDATE NAME: Deanna Llanos                  DATE/TIME: 05/12/14

 

ESTIMATED LESSON LENGTH: 3 Weeks

 

GRADE LEVEL:  4th Grade

 

SETTING (general, special education, or RtI group): 28 Students, 14 male & 14 female, 14 EL

 

PUPILS:  [ x ] WHOLE CLASS     [ x ] SMALL GROUP     [ x ] INDIVIDUAL

 

 



TOPIC/TEMA

A brief and clear statement of the themes, ideas, attitudes and/or skills students will learn about in this lesson.

 

RATIONALE /JUSTIFICACION:

This lesson is important for students because they are able to learn and understand different cultures during the Gold Rush Era that will tie into future activities and lessons. Through reading the various books the students are able to see the different daily lives of people who experienced the Gold Rush and relate this to other cultures and lives today. Students will be asked to keep a journal in which they will elaborate on ideas that have been discussed in the various books.

 

CONTENT STANDARD/ ESTANDAR DEL CONTENIDO

4.3 Students explain the economic, social, and political life in California from the

establishment of the Bear Flag Republic through the Mexican-American War, the

Gold Rush, and the granting of statehood.

3.

Analyze the effects of the Gold Rush on settlements, daily life, politics, and the physi­



cal environment

 

ACADEMIC LANGUAGE DEMAND

In this lesson, students will keep journals throughout their time reading the book. Students will have the opportunity to discuss and share with their group members as well as their classmates on the information they have discovered or leaned. Throughout the lesson students will be given prompts for what they could write about daily. Their journals will be a great tool to keep notes about what is going on in the story and they will be able to elaborate on different characters in the story.

 

 

CONTENT VOCABULARY/ VOCABULARIO DEL CONTENIDO:

Gold Rush, Gold Rush Era, Culture, nugget, gold fever, foreigners, forty-niners, placer gold, coyote mining, profitable

 

 

LANGUAGE FUNCTIONS/FUNCIONES DE LENGUAJE

The students will be able to describe the different cultures and will be able to inform their classmates about different people’s daily life. They will also be able to compare and contrast different cultures experiences.

 

LANGUAGE FORMS (GRAMMATICAL  STRUCTURES/ESTRUCTURAS GRAMATICALES)

Using their journals students will be able to practice different types of writing, such as sentences, paragraphs, essays. This will also be able to use questioning about he book.

 

ELD STANDARD/ ESTANDAR DE INGLES COMO SEGUNDO IDIOMA

One or two K-12 ELD and/or ELA standards being addressed by the language objective(s) of the lesson.

10. Writing

Productive

b) Write clear and coherent summaries of texts and experiences using complete and concise sentences and key words (e.g., from notes or graphic organizers).

C. Productive

9. Expressing information and ideas in formal oral presentations on academic topics

 

STRATEGIES/TECHNIQUES TO SUPPORT ACADEMIC LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT:



            Given the identified academic language demand, how is this lesson being adapted, and scaffolded for the targeted language proficiency level of your students (in your lesson)?

 

UNIVERSAL ACCESS

For our students who are English Learners and students with Special Needs, they will have the opportunity to draw pictures as well as writing sentences to practice their writing. They will also have the opportunity to discuss to other classmates with their ideas.

 

OBJECTIVE(S)/ OBJETIVO: (Content and Language)

After reading one of the various books in a group, students will explain the daily life during the California Gold Rush by writing in their journals or a visual poster presentation using at least three academic terms 
 

ASSESSMENT(S)/EVALUACION
Students will keep a journal in which they will be able to jot down notes of the book they are reading. At the end of reading their books they will create a poster in which shows different elements of the story as a group providing accurate information of their understanding of the books.

 

STRATEGY/TECHNIQUE/ ESTRATEGIA/TECNICA:

Students will be able to journal throughout their reading of the book; they will also be able to think-pair-share while working in their cooperative learning groups. Throughout the lesson we will also uses guided reading techniques to help them with their understanding of the books.

 

REQUIRED TEACHER BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The required background for this lessons is to be able to understand and know the four different books that discuss the California Gold Rush. I should try and familiarize myself with the different cultures and try to have a further understanding of what they went through and how this relates to the daily life.

 

TASK ANALYSIS: Students should be familiar to journaling, Think-pair-share, and guided reading.

 

PROCEDURES/ PROCEDIMIENTO:

            Introduction/Introducción

Begin by captivating students interest about the Gold Rush, by explaining that because of the Gold Rush California became California we know today.

 


  1. Students will be placed in four different groups, depending on who I feel like would work best together to make this lesson as successful as possible. Each group will have about seven students in them, which will help them work in cooperative learning groups.




  1. Once the students are placed in their groups, each group will be assigned to read one of the books listed below:



  1. By the Great Horn Spoon! By: Sid Fleischman

  2. Anisett Lundberg: American Diaries #3: California 1851 By: Kathleen Duey

  3. Bandit's Moon By: Sid Fleischman

  4. Ishi: Last of His Tribe By: Theodora Kroeber.



  1. Throughout each day student will have the opportunity to work with their group and read one chapter of their book. Throughout their time reading I will post questions on the board such as guided reading questions that they will be able to discuss as a group such as:

1. Does the text remind you of something you know or believe?

2. What is going to happen next? How do you know?

3. What does the author want you to learn at this point?

4. What did the author mean by his last paragraph?

5. What questions do you have about the text?

6. Which parts of the text are the most important?

7. Which image stood out as you read?

8. If you could only use a few sentences to describe the test, what would they be?

(Witter)

I would give groups 2-3 guided questions while they are reading and they can use the strategy of think-pair-share.



  1. After they have completed their chapter reading they will take time, individually to write down in their journals the 1-2 guided questions that were given to them. Students will also be asked to draw images they see while they are reading, poems, or paragraphs about the story or different characters. Whenever I feel like a group is not on task with their journals I will take turns everyday sitting with a different group during their reading time.



  1. I can use their journals every 3 days to look at how they are doing and use as a formative assessment to make sure they understand their reading.



  1. Once complete with their book they will be able to work as a group to create a poster about their whole book.

 

            Closure/Clausura:

After they complete their poster they will present to the class their understanding.  

 

 



MATERIALS/ MATERIALES:


  1. By the Great Horn Spoon! By: Sid Fleischman

  2. Anisett Lundberg: American Diaries #3: California 1851 By: Kathleen Duey

  3. Bandit's Moon By: Sid Fleischman

  4. Ishi: Last of His Tribe By: Theodora Kroeber.

  5. Guided Questions

  6. Journals

  7. Rubric for poster.

  8. Poster paper

  9. Scissors

  10. Glue Stick

  11. Markers

  12. Computer

  13. Printer

  14. Pens/Pencils

 

PERSONAL TEACHING OBJECTIVES:
I want to create a lesson that students are engaged in and interested in learning about the material by using different strategies that will keep them interested. I want to create a lesson that students are able to remember for a long time.
 

ASSESSMENT OF PERSONAL TEACHING OBJECTIVES

I will be able to assess my goal if students will learn about the California Gold Rush and different culture groups that were affected and the daily life of different cultures by reading various books in groups. Students will be able to identify the different groups and elaborate through writing in journals. Students will comprehend what they read by creating a group poster of their specific book.




Sandra Valadez

BILINGUAL PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION PROGRAM

BASIC INSTRUCTIONAL MODEL (BIM)

A MULTIPLE STRATEGY LESSON PLAN GUIDE

The Basic Instructional Model (BIM) is a general format for planning lessons. It includes the major components of good lesson plans. It is a format adaptable to several instructional strategies. Whether the teacher is intending to use a direct instruction strategy, discovery strategy, or other strategy, these are the components of an effective lesson plan.


CANDIDATE NAME: Sandra Valadez-Garcia DATE/TIME: May 11, 2014
ESTIMATED LESSON LENGTH: 45 minutes
GRADE LEVEL: 4th grade
SETTING: In a classroom with twenty-eight 4th grade students. Out of the class there are 14 boys and 14 girls. 14 students are EL.
PUPILS: [ X ] WHOLE CLASS [ X] SMALL GROUP [ ] INDIVIDUAL

TOPIC/TEMA

Students will be able to identify the environmental effects of the California Gold Rush.


RATIONALE /JUSTIFICACION:

This lesson is important because the students need to understand the techniques that were used to obtain gold and their impacts on the environment. This lesson will teach the students that as humans we have a great impact on the environment. This lesson addresses the content standard in the sense that the students will be seeing the different techniques miners in the Gold Rush used and their impact on the environment.


CONTENT STANDARD/ ESTANDAR DEL CONTENIDO

Social Studies

4.3.3 Analyze the effects of the Gold Rush on settlements, daily life, politics, and the physical environment (e.g., using biographies of John Sutter, Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo, Louise Clapp).
ACADEMIC LANGUAGE DEMAND

In applying academic language demand the students will be given the opportunity to describe the pros and the cons of the different mining techniques used by the miners in the California Gold Rush.


CONTENT VOCABULARY/ VOCABULARIO DEL CONTENIDO:

Hydraulic mining

Debris

Pollution



Denuding forest

Mercury


Longtom

Panning


Strike

Placer


Rocker

Gold


Mine

technique



LANGUAGE FUNCTIONS/FUNCIONES DE LENGUAJE

Students will be explaining and informing the class about their specific mining technique.


LANGUAGE FORMS (GRAMMATICAL STRUCTURES/ESTRUCTURAS GRAMATICALES)

Students will be using noun and nouns phrases as well as adjectives to describe the pros and cons of different types of gold mining techniques.



ELD STANDARD/ ESTANDAR DE INGLES COMO SEGUNDO IDIOMA

A. Collaborative

1. Exchange information and ideas with others through oral collaborative discussions on a range of social and academic topics

C. Productive

9. Expressing information and ideas in formal oral presentations on academic topics

12. Selecting and applying varied and precise vocabulary and other language resources to effectively covey ideas

STRATEGIES/TECHNIQUES TO SUPPORT ACADEMIC LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT:

In this lesson I will first start with the KWL Chart which will help me access background knowledge. I will use this chart to add students’ responses and scaffold for the students by providing a visual f the discussion and brainstorm. As we read and watch the video, I will also scaffold by adding the academic vocabulary to the chart. This chart will be at the front of the room, hanging on the wall, for students to have easy access when needed.


UNIVERSAL ACCESS

Modifications for English Learners and students with Special Needs include strategic seating, peer support, visual representations for words and ideas.


OBJECTIVE(S)/ OBJETIVO: (Content and Language)

Students will be able to describe the environmental effects of gold mining by writing three concrete effects of the gold rush in California.


Students will be able to use complete sentences with proper use of nouns/verbs when writing down the effects of the California gold rush on the environment.
ASSESSMENT(S)/EVALUACION

The students will do a journal write describing how the California gold rush effected the environment. When explaining they will use complete sentences with subject agreement.



STRATEGY/TECHNIQUE/ ESTRATEGIA/TECNICA:

I will be using the strategies think-pair-share to activate background knowledge, KWL chart to map out the students prior and acquired knowledge throughout the lesson. I also will be using Guided Reading.



REQUIRED TEACHER BACKGROUND INFORMATION:

The required background knowledge that I must acquire in order to follow through with the lesson, will include an understanding about the different mining techniques used during the gold rush. Also I will need to have a great deal of knowledge of the lasting effect of the gold rush today.


TASK ANALYSIS: Student should be familiar with the KWL Chart. Also the will need be familiar with the guided reading procedure and the think-pair-share procedure.

PROCEDURES/ PROCEDIMIENTO:

Introduction/Introducción

For the introduction I will begin by accessing their current level of knowledge based on the KWL Chart. I will pass around “gold” and ask the students to share some of the ways the miners were able to obtain the gold from the land and the rivers. Then I will ask them to think about the environment. I’ll ask them what they would like to know about the effects on the environment.

Activity Sequence/ Secuencia de actividades



  1. Students will help me fill out what they know about the techniques used by the pioneers in the California gold rush.

  2. Students will formulate question on the environmental effects of the gold rush in California.

  3. Student will continue with a guided reading of the effects of the mining techniques in the California gold rush. As students take turns reading we will define words as they come across them.

  4. I will add the words and definitions to the KWL Chart.

  5. The students will then watch a video that explains the effects of the mining techniques that are present to this day. During this video students will be talking note.

Closure/Clausura

When we are finished with the reading and the video for the lesson the students will do a journal write. Student will write down three concrete effects of the California gold rush on the environment. As a review of what we learned today we will have a class discussion of the environmental impacts of the California gold rush. While we are discussing I will be writing down what we learned on our KWL Chart.

MATERIALS/ MATERIALES:


    • Journals and pencil for each student

    • A Sheet of Chart Paper

    • Article: http://www.calgoldrush.com/

    • Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PV547grgDL4



PERSONAL TEACHING OBJECTIVES:

My personal teaching objective is to keep the students interested and engaged throughout the lesson.
ASSESSMENT OF PERSONAL TEACHING OBJECTIVES

I will know that I have met my teaching objective if I see that the students are engaged with their learning, asking questions and participating in the discussion.

Matt Barton

BILINGUAL PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION PROGRAM

BASIC INSTRUCTIONAL MODEL (BIM)

A MULTIPLE STRATEGY LESSON PLAN GUIDE

The Basic Instructional Model (BIM) is a general format for planning lessons. It includes the major components of good lesson plans. It is a format adaptable to several instructional strategies. Whether the teacher is intending to use a direct instruction strategy, discovery strategy, or other strategy, these are the components of an effective lesson plan.


CANDIDATE NAME: ___Matt Barton____________ DATE/TIME: __5/13/2014______
ESTIMATED LESSON LENGTH: __All Day (6 hours)_________________
GRADE LEVEL: ____4th___________
SETTING (general, special education, or RtI group): General
PUPILS: [x] WHOLE CLASS [ ] SMALL GROUP [ ] INDIVIDUAL

TOPIC/TEMA

Students will be a part of a “boomtown” from the Gold Rush Era.


RATIONALE /JUSTIFICACION:

This lesson will pull together all of the concepts from our unit on the gold rush. They will have already gone over what daily life would have been like in the gold rush for different groups of people. Through this they will have a more accurate picture of life during the Gold Rush Era. This will be a summative lesson that ties the unit together. This lesson goes with the content standard because students will be able to experience firsthand the daily life, politics, settlements, and the environment during this time.
CONTENT STANDARD/ ESTANDAR DEL CONTENIDO

4.3 Students explain the economic, social, and political life in California from the

establishment of the Bear Flag Republic through the Mexican-American War, the

Gold Rush, and the granting of statehood.

3. Analyze the effects of the Gold Rush on settlements, daily life, politics, and the physical environment (e.g., using biographies of John Sutter, Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo, Louise Clapp).
ACADEMIC LANGUAGE DEMAND


  • Students will be interacting with each other and parent volunteers to trade their “gold” for food and goods, as well as make deals with each other. They will need to know the vocabulary for basic gold panning terms as well as transactional terms.


CONTENT VOCABULARY/ VOCABULARIO DEL CONTENIDO:

-gold panning

-claim jump

-exchange

-Gold Rush

-Boom Town

-Nuggets

-settlement

            -mining 
LANGUAGE FUNCTIONS/FUNCIONES DE LENGUAJE

Describing- Students will describe what they would like to exchange their “gold for

Explain- Students will explain to fellow classmates what they would like them to do (e.g. watch their claim while they go exchange their gold)
LANGUAGE FORMS (GRAMMATICAL STRUCTURES/ESTRUCTURAS GRAMATICALES)

Question words (how much, what is, can you, etc.)

Past tense (I went, I did, my friend was…)

Comparing (This is similar to…)


ELD STANDARD/ ESTANDAR DE INGLES COMO SEGUNDO IDIOMA

  1. Exchanging information/ideas 

Contribute to class, group, and partner discussions, including sustained dialogue, by 

following turn‐taking rules, asking relevant questions, affirming others, and adding relevant information. 

STRATEGIES/TECHNIQUES TO SUPPORT ACADEMIC LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT:

We are giving them the freedom to talk to whoever they’d like so they are comfortable, and they have a lot of context because they are role playing and are actually participating in the gold panning and trading.


UNIVERSAL ACCESS

Students with limited language ability may ask questions in Spanish and get help from Spanish speaking classmates

Students with special needs may partner up with another student or parent or do the activity on their own, depending on the severity of their needs.


OBJECTIVE(S)/ OBJETIVO: (Content and Language)

After completing this activity, students will be able to write about their experience from the point of view of an actual person living during the Gold Rush. They will then be able to connect these ideas with present day trends and situations.



ASSESSMENT(S)/EVALUACION

Students will write a journal writing about their experience in the boomtown, describing what their day consisted of and the struggles that they faced. They will connect their experience to what they have been learning about the real people that were in the gold rush, and describe how what they experienced can connect to current events and people.




STRATEGY/TECHNIQUE/ ESTRATEGIA/TECNICA:

Role Play



REQUIRED TEACHER BACKGROUND INFORMATION: Knowledge of the different cultures present in California during the gold rush, how people interacted with each other, and the different struggles that people of the time faced.
TASK ANALYSIS: Task Analyze for Prerequisite Student Skills (i.e., what entry skills must students possess in order to be successful with the lesson).

PROCEDURES/ PROCEDIMIENTO:

Introduction/Introducción

The activity will be first introduced at the beginning of the unit, as something to look forward to. As the unit progresses, more and more information will be given out about it. At the beginning of the lesson, the activity will be explained in full, including how to exchange gold, what students may buy, laws of the town, and what the final assessment will be.

Activity Sequence/ Secuencia de actividades

1. This activity will require a lot of set up and many volunteers. We will need fake buildings to be made, gold spray painted rocks to be put by the river for panning, and volunteers to run stations.

2. We will drive to the river where this fake boomtown will have been set-up earlier by parent volunteers and teachers.

3. Students will be told about the rules of the town, which are:

-You may stake your claim at any spot, but once you leave that claim is up for grabs

-You may have someone watch your claim for you

-If you are caught stealing from someone’s person or claim, you will be put in jail for fifteen minutes.

-You may exchange the gold you find for money at the bank

-You may buy food and other things at the general store.

4. They will be given the rest of the day to pan for gold and buy things, with parents and teacher watching and enforcing rules.

5. At the end of the day, parents will help clean up everything. Students will be given their assessment assignment for homework.


Closure/Clausura

We will ask students a few questions about their experience and then give them their journal prompt for homework.



MATERIALS/ MATERIALES:

Cardboard buildings and jail

Gold painted rocks

Food


Other prizes

Fake money



PERSONAL TEACHING OBJECTIVES:

My personal objective is to provide a fun and interesting activity for students that will stick with them for a long time, and that will enhance their understanding of the content.
ASSESSMENT OF PERSONAL TEACHING OBJECTIVES

I will observe the students during the lesson to see if they look like they are having fun. I will use the assessment journals to see if the students are learning the content that they are supposed to.

Assessments:
Through assessments, we will use two different forms of assessments. In one lesson we will be using formative and summative assessment. Through formative assessment we will take a look at their journals every 2-3 days and check to make sure they are answering their guided questions correctly. Whenever we feel like a group is not on task we will sit in with them and make sure they are reading their chapter and answering their guided questions we will be able to assess where they are in their reading. At the end of the various book readings, as a summative assessment students will create a poster assignment in which they will be able to show the different aspects of the book through elements of a story, such as characters, setting, rising action, climax, falling action, and resolution. Students will be given a rubric in which shows what I expect on their posters. To assess the students gained knowledge we will be having the students write in their journals.  This will help us as teachers see where the students are in their writing and their understanding of the content area.  We will also have the students participate in class discussions which will provide us with feedback that we can reflect on.  These discussions will show us if the students obtained a full understanding of the lessons being taught and their improvement in their language development. Our final (summative) assessment will be the running journal that they will keep throughout the unit. The last entry will be their response to the “Boomtown” activity where they will write about their experience as if they were really in that time and then make connections to present day life.

Resource/ Reference Pages:
Brooks, Martin G., and Jacqueline Grennon Brooks. "Membership." Educational Leadership:The Constructivist Classroom:The Courage to Be Constructivist. Educational Leadership, n.d. Web. 16 May 2014.
Celic, C. M. (2009). English language learners day by day, K-6: a complete guide to literacy, content-area, and language instruction. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
Witter, Maddie. "Questions to Ask During Guided Reading." Reading Without Limites (2013): n. pag. Web. 14 May 2014.

Download 69.11 Kb.

Share with your friends:




The database is protected by copyright ©sckool.org 2023
send message

    Main page