Masaryk university brno faculty of education


Vrchní praporčík NATO HQ SACT, Norfolk, USA. (July 8, 2009). Vrchní praporčík.cz. Retrieved April 2, 2010, from http://www.vrchnipraporcik.cz/index.php/vrchprap-nato-hq.html



Download 3.57 Mb.
Page3/14
Date03.05.2017
Size3.57 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   14

Vrchní praporčík NATO HQ SACT, Norfolk, USA. (July 8, 2009). Vrchní praporčík.cz. Retrieved April 2, 2010, from http://www.vrchnipraporcik.cz/index.php/vrchprap-nato-hq.html.


Výuka jazyků na Univerzitě obrany. (2009). Univerzita obrany. Retrieved January 12, 2010, from http://www.vojenskaskola.cz/skola/uo/sluzby zarizeni/Stranky/vyuka_jazyku.aspx.

  1. LIST OF APPENDICES



Appendix 1 - Comparison chart of the levels

Appendix 2 - Summary of STANAG 6001 levels

Appendix 3 - STANAG 6001 Test Syllabus For Teachers and Candidates

Appendix 4 - ALCPT + Answer sheet
Sources:

http://www.campaignmilitaryenglish.com/Course/teacher.htm.



http://www.mod.gov.rs/.../stanag/srpski%20stanag%206001/stanag%206001%20Syllabus%20for%20candidates.doc.

American Language Course Placement Test –ALCPT Form 44. (August 1994). Lackland Air Force Base, Texas: Defense Language Institute English Language Center.




STANAG 6001

Standardized agreement 6001 (1976)


NATO: & BILC:

CEF

Common European Framework


COE: Council of Europe

ALTE Scale
ALTE: Association of Language Testers in Europe

Cambridge ESOL
Cambridge ESOL Examinations. (formerly UCLES)

IELTS

The British Council, IDP & Cambridge ESOL



5555

Native/bilingual













(DIPLOMA)

9

4444

Fully Professional


C2 Mastery



Proficient User

5

Good User



Upper Advanced

CPE

8

7

C1 Effective Operational Proficiency

4

Competent User



Lower Advanced

CAE

6




3333

Minimum Professional



B2+ Vantage+



Independent User

3

Independent User



Upper Intermediate

FCE

5

B2 Vantage




2222

Limited Working



B1+ Threshold+



2

Threshold User



Lower Intermediate

PET

4

B1 Threshold




1111

Elementary


A2+ Waystage+




Basic User

1

Waystage User



Elementary

KET

3

A2 Waystage

2




0

Unscaled


A1 Breakthrough

0

Breakthrough



Beginner




1

0

Appendix 1
Comparison Chart of the levels


Appendix 2

Summary of STANAG 6001 levels



Level 1




Listening

Can understand common familiar phrases and short simple sentences about everyday personal and survival needs.

Speaking__Can_maintain_simple_face-to-face_communication_in_typical_everyday_situations.__Reading'>Speaking

Can maintain simple face-to-face communication in typical everyday situations.

Reading

Can read very simple connected written material directly related to everyday survival or workplace situations.

Writing

Can write lists, short notes, phone messages to meet immediate personal needs. Can complete forms.



Level 2




Listening

Can follow conversations and talks about everyday topics, including personal news, well-known current events and routine job-related topics and topics in his/her professional field.

Speaking

Can communicate in everyday social and routine workplace situations.

Reading

Can read simple, straightforward, factual texts on familiar topics.

Writing

Can write with some precision simple personal correspondence and routine workplace correspondence and related documents, including brief reports.



Level 3




Listening

Can understand conversations, briefings and telephone calls about complex topics, including economics, science, technology and his/her own professional field.

Speaking

Can participate effectively in most formal & informal conversations, including meetings. Can deliver briefings.

Reading

Read with almost complete comprehension a variety of authentic written material on general and professional subjects, including unfamiliar subject matter.

Writing

Can write effective formal and informal correspondence and other documents on practical, social and professional topics and special fields of competence.



Level 4

 

Listening

Can understand all forms/styles of speech used for professional purposes including on unfamiliar topics. Can recognise nuances of meaning and irony and humour.

Speaking

Can use the language with great precision, accuracy, and fluency for all professional purposes.

Reading

Can read all styles and forms of the written language used for professional purposes, including texts from unfamiliar general and professional-specialist areas.

Writing

Can write the language precisely and accurately and can draft all levels of prose pertinent to professional needs.

Appendix 3

STANAG 6001 Test Syllabus For Teachers and Candidates




  1. LISTENING




    1. Description of the Listening Test

The listening test consists of six tasks, two per each level, getting progressively more difficult in the course of the test. Each task consists of five items and each item is scored 1 point. Maximum score that can be obtained is 30 points.

Duration : Recordings last up to three minutes per task. Total duration of the Listening test is 30-45min.


1.2 Types of listening

Monologue, dialogue and multi-participant in both catered and authentic English. These may be lectures, briefings, interviews, discussions, radio broadcasts, TV broadcasts, etc.




    1. Listening skills focus

Identify topic and specific information; Listen for gist; Understand common abbreviations and acronyms, including those of a military nature; Understand explicitly stated information; Identify detail correctly, be able to make predictions and infer from well-structured context; Make inferences from incomplete information and emotional register of speakers; understand implicit information.
1.4 Topics

Home and family, food, shopping, free time activities, sport, holidays, traveling, daily routines, people, places, job procedure, military matters, current events, education, politics, economics, business, culture, science and technology.


1.5 Types of tasks

Short-answer questions, table completion, sentence completion, gap-filling, diagrams, maps, pictures, listing, multiple-choice, matching, sequencing, true/false/not-given questions, and a combination of the above.




    1. Test-taker performance

Level 1 is expected to score 8-15 points

Level 2 is expected to score 16-23 points

Level 3 is expected to score 24-30 points



  1. SPEAKING


2.1 Test level

The test is for levels 1 to 3 of language competence as described in the BILC interpretations of 2001.


2.2 Description of the Speaking Test

Stage One: Warm-up questions (up to 1 minute)

An interlocutor introduces himself/herself and asks the student to do the same.



Stage Two: Structured interview (3 minutes)

The candidate responds to a few questions, each requiring an increasing complexity of response, on general topics. Candidates are prompted to extend their answers.



Stage Three: Long Turn (3 minutes)

The candidate is given a task by the examiner relating to a general topic, which occasionally has a military flavour and asked to read the information for one minute before he/she responds. The candidate is requested to speak for two or three minutes. Examiners who listen expect a higher performance than STANAG level 1.



Stage Four: Discussion (6 minutes)

The candidate is asked to develop issues related to the task in the long turn. There are two parts: A and B. Part A consists of three areas, each with three questions, related to the topic in the long turn. These questions are of increasing complexity and should enable examiners to distinguish between good Level 2 candidates and potential Level 3 candidates. Part B is designed to confirm the capability of candidates reaching STANAG Level 3. It consists of a discussion point related very generally to the long turn task. Candidates should produce a range of language more complex than in the previous parts of the test.



Stage Five: Wind-down (up to one minute)

The interlocutor indicates that the test is ended and may ask a simple courteous question.



Duration of the Speaking test: 15 minutes

2.3 Types of Speaking

Interaction with an examiner, uninterrupted speech.


2.4 Speaking skills focus

Make introductions, express greetings, farewell and thanks; Ask and answer questions and exchange ideas and information on familiar topics in predictable situations; Ask for services and assistance in different situations; describe events and activities (habits and routines, personal experiences); make plans and arrangements; describe hopes and ambitions; Compare and contrast; explain likes or dislikes, opinions and plans; give directions and instructions; Make suggestions; agree and disagree with others; talk about matters of personal or professional interest and/or relevant to everyday life; ask for information in the workplace and at an interpersonal level; request clarification, express satisfaction, dissatisfaction and confirmation. Narrate and describe reactions.


2.4 Topics

Home and family, food, shopping, free time activities, sport, holidays, travelling, daily routines, people, places, job procedures, military matters (units, duties, equipment, etc), current events, education, communication, politics, economics, business, culture, science and technology.


2.5 Types of tasks

Warm-Up questions; structured interview on general topics; long turn based on general topics or general military topics; discussion on aspects of the topic introduced in the long turn; wind-down


2.6 Test-taker performance

Level 1- Able to produce simple phrases and sentences providing relevant personal and professional information; Get by with sufficient vocabulary on topics such as family, hobbies, interests, work, travel, current events with some hesitations; Some repetition and hesitation occurs requiring patience from the listener;

First language features are marked and sometimes impede communication; Errors are usually in terms of agreement and tenses; The syntax and grammar of complex sentences have frequent errors and may lead to confusion in meaning.



Level 2- Deal with most situations where the language is spoken;

Enter into conversations that are familiar, of personal interest or relevant to everyday life; Connect phrases to describe experiences and events; Narrate a procedure or an event and describe reactions; Use reasonably accurately a repertoire of frequently used routines associated with predictable situations; Keep going comprehensibly even though pausing for planning and repair in grammar and lexis is evident; Initiate and maintain close face-to-face conversation; Express and respond to feelings such as surprise, happiness, sadness, interest and indifference; Both simple and complex sentences demonstrate control in word order and grammatical form although complex sentences have more errors, but this does not lead to confusion in meaning.



Level 3-Briefly give reasons and explanations for opinions and plans; Repeat back part of what somebody has said to confirm mutual understanding; Link a series of elements into a connected linear sequence of points; Start again with a new tactic when communication breaks down; Syntax and grammar are usually accurate although errors still occur; Great range and variety in communication is evident; Express thoughts about abstract or cultural topics.

Scoring criteria: In assessing candidate’s performance, the following criteria are taken into consideration: Discourse Competence, Pronunciation, Vocabulary, and Grammar.


  1. READING




    1. Test level

The test is for levels 1 to 3 of language competence as described in the BILC interpretations of 2001.
3.2 Description of the Reading Test

The reading test consists of six tasks, two per each level, getting progressively more difficult in the course of the test. Each task consists of five items and each item is scored 1 point. Maximum score that can be obtained is 30 points.



Duration of the Reading test: 60 minutes.
3.2 Types of Reading

Notices and signs, announcements, post-cards, timetables, programmes, agendas, menus, advertisements, handouts, leaflets, brochures, guides, forms, diary, maps, or plans, news, text books, personal and professional correspondence, informational and editorial items in newspapers, periodicals and professional journals (articles reports, reviews), encyclopaedia entries, dictionary entries, imaginative literature of a contemporary popular nature (novels/extracts and short stories, poems/verse), manuals, technical texts, charts, etc.

Texts should be drawn from the following functional types: narrative, discursive, descriptive, informative and instructional.


    1. Reading skills focus

Understanding the main idea, identify detail, guess meaning of unfamiliar words from context, answer factual questions about texts, understand hypothesis, supported opinion, argumentation, clarification, understand implicit information, distinguish between various stylistic levels, recognize humour, irony, emotional overtones and subtleties.


    1. Topics

Home and family, food, shopping, free time activities, sport, holidays, traveling, daily routines, people, places, job procedures, military matters (units, duties, equipment, etc), current events, education, communication, politics, economics, business, culture, science and technology.


    1. Types of tasks

Short-answer questions, table completion, sentence completion, gap-filling, diagrams, maps, pictures, listing, multiple-choice, matching, sequencing, true/false/not-given questions, and a combination of the above.

    1. Test-taker performance

Level 1 is expected to score 8-15 points

Level 2 is expected to score 16-23 points

Level 3 is expected to score 24-30 points



  1. WRITING




    1. Test level

The test is for levels 1 to 3 of language competence as described in the BILC interpretations of 2001.


    1. Description of the Writing Test

The Writing Test consists of two parts.

Part One -Candidates are expected to produce up to 100-120 words of connected, factual, coherent writing. They are instructed to spend 20 minutes on this task.

Task Part Two - Candidates are expected to produce up to 200-250 words of effective and extended pieces of writing demonstrating appropriate command of language).

They are instructed to spend 40 minutes on this task.



Duration of the Writing test: 60 minutes.
4.3 Writing skills focus

Giving and asking for information; Expressing thanks and apologies; Making and responding to requests; Writing and replying to invitations; Asking for and giving reasons for a course of action; Descriptions and comparisons; Narrating and explaining a sequence of events in paragraphs; Asking for clarification; Expressing own opinion on wide range of topics, both personal and professional.




4.4 Topics

Personal information, job, family, home, free time activities, general routines, holidays, travelling, food, festive occasions; Art, science and technology, culture, economics, politics and military domain.


4.5 Types of tasks

Short personal correspondence related to job, family, home and other everyday activities, e.g. lists, short notes, postcards, e-mails, short questionnaires asking for description, letters, phone messages, filling-in forms; personal and routine workplace correspondence and related documents, such as memoranda, brief reports, and private letters on everyday topics, CVs (resumes), summaries; official correspondence, reports in a special field and extended pieces of writing of analytical, hypothetical and argumentative nature, such as briefings, extended reports, speeches and discussion papers.


4.6 Test taker performance

Level 1- Can complete writing tasks requiring information of phrase length. The range of vocabulary is limited and there is a frequent repetition of basic vocabulary. Can occasionally use examples of a wider range of words with certain errors in word choice. Attempts to use a range of structures but the lack of control of grammar and punctuation can cause considerable difficulties. Tries to use some complex sentences but errors in grammar, especially in verb phrases are common and make the writing difficult to understand in places.

Level 2- Can complete tasks requiring language at the level of the simple sentence, occasionally with complex sentences with common discourse markers, such as “but”. Ideas may be roughly organized according to major points or straightforward sequencing of events. However, relationship of ideas may not always be clear, and transitions may be awkward. Simple, high frequency grammatical structures are typically controlled, while more complex structures are used inaccurately or avoided. Vocabulary use is appropriate for high frequency topics, with some circumlocutions. Errors in grammar, vocabulary, spelling, and punctuation may sometimes distort meaning. However, the individual writes in a way that is generally appropriate for the occasion, although command of the written language is not always firm.

Level 3 -Can write effective formal and informal correspondence and documents on practical, social, and professional topics with considerable ease. Can use the written language for argumentation, analysis, hypothesis, explanation, narration and description. Although techniques used to organize extended texts may seem somewhat foreign to native readers, the correct meaning is conveyed. Transitions are usually successful. Control of structure, vocabulary, spelling, and punctuation is adequate to convey the message accurately. Errors are occasional, do not interfere with comprehension, and rarely disturb the native reader. When it is necessary for a document to meet full native expectations, some editing will be required.

Scoring criteria: In assessing candidate’s performance, the following criteria are taken into consideration: Task completion, Organization, Vocabulary, Syntax and Grammar.

Appendix 4


Download 3.57 Mb.

Share with your friends:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   14




The database is protected by copyright ©sckool.org 2020
send message

    Main page