Marzipan-msg 7/25/10



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> period. As has been said, making it from scratch is a pain... and I would

> assume that would be using a food processor...And I know that sugar wasn't

> as common as it is today. would people in period want/be able to make large

> or numerous marzipan pieces? What sized things would they have made? and

> for what occasions?


I don't know about sotelties, but the late period

cookbook (Staindl, second half 16rth century) I'm

currently trying to get hold of the rest of has a

first chapter full of recipes that call for

considerable amounts of ground almonds and

mentions an 'almond mill' (Mandelmuel) as a common

kitchen implement (though it makes allowance for

cooks not having one, telling them to use a mortar

instead). Given the prevalence of almond milk in

period cooking, grinding up almonds must have been

common enough to make the idea of marzipan in

large amounts at least not too outlandish. As to

sugar being less comon - yes, but not that much

less, at least in late period (I doubt whether the

court of Charlemagne consumed much marzipan, but I

am fairly sure that that of Emperor Charles V

did). Marzipan probably was not as comparatively

cheap as it is today (I can get a 250-gram chunk

for the same price as a decent one-pound loaf of

bread!), but a culture of ostentation that would

burn cinnamon in braziers just to show you could

would not stop at using expensive ingredients.

think of it as a big bowl of caviar.
Giano

Date: Thu, 18 Oct 2001 13:53:00 -0700 (PDT)

From: Jennifer Whitbeck

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Marzipan creations, like onions...

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org
--- Olwen the Odd wrote:

> Gee I'd really like to see a picture or the real

> thing of one of these Mandelmuel's.
I heartily second that!

I did a really brief web search and couldn't find

mandelmuel, but I did find this modern "almond

grinder". Looks like my cheese grater's weird cousin,

though: http://www.theezycatalog.com/grinders.htm
Giano - have you found any indication as to what these

old mandelmuels looked like?

Date: Fri, 19 Oct 2001 07:29:09 -0400

From: Philip & Susan Troy

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Marzipan creations, like onions...


Stefan li Rous wrote:

> Is the sugar only for taste? Or does it affect the structure? I

> wonder if Splenda or other artifical, granulated suger substitute

> would work?


I would think the sugar is more or less necessary for structure, to help in cohesion, which may be evidenced by the fact that while tastes and sugar usage for taste does seem to vary, the proportion of one part almonds to one part sugar rarely seems to [vary] in recipes. I dunno, though, maybe there's some kind of sugar substitute that would work better than Splenda.
On the other hand, you can make some butt-kicking savory dishes with

almond milk ; )


Adamantius

Date: Fri, 19 Oct 2001 08:31:27 -0500 (CDT)

From: "Pixel, Goddess and Queen"

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Marzipan creations, like onions...
On Fri, 19 Oct 2001, Philip & Susan Troy wrote:

> Stefan li Rous wrote:

> > I've been thinking of trying some

> > marzipan things after all the comments here. Maybe this should be what

> > I start with.

> >


> > Is the sugar only for taste? Or does it affect the structure? I

> > wonder if Splenda or other artifical, granulated suger substitute

> > would work?

>

> I would think the sugar is more or less necessary for structure, to help =



in cohesion, which may be evidenced by the fact that while tastes and sugar=

usage for taste does seem to vary, the proportion of one part almonds to o=

ne part sugar rarely seems to [vary] in recipes. I dunno, though, maybe the=

re's some kind of sugar substitute that would work better than Splenda.

>

> Adamantius


I will be good and over the weekend I will post the recipes I have for

marzipan that use eggs. Usually the sugar, whether fondant or powdered, is

required for consistency--almond paste and rosewater by itself is just

sticky goo. I *think* there's at least one recipe that calls for

granulated rather than icing sugar, but it may require some variety of

cooking. I'll check. They are, incidentally, AFAIK, modern recipes, but

they will give you marzipan.
Margaret

From: "Decker, Terry D."

To: "'sca-cooks at ansteorra.org'"

Subject: RE: [Sca-cooks] Marzipan creations, like onions...

Date: Fri, 19 Oct 2001 12:27:20 -0500
www.bakerscatalog.com I have the latest catalog sitting on the desk.
Bear
> When I have purchased commercially made almond paste, I

> usually get it from the

> Baker's Catalogue...and I believe they have a web site.

>

> Kiri



From: marcellina_dangelis at web.de

Date: Thu, 1 Nov 2001 15:52:12 +0100

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Marzipan Request


You might try the recipe for the "Mandeligel" (hedgehock from almonds). You find it in the "Kochbuoch aus dem Inntal".
In modern words:

Take two parts almonds, one part powdered sugar. Put the almonds in hot water, until you can peel them. Put the peeled almonds in the cutter and cut them as fine as possible. Afterwards add the powder sugar spoon by spoon and continue cutting and mixing. You get a oily, crumbly stuff. If you want colored marzipan add the color with the sugar. Take it and kned it to a smooth mass.

If you keep it in the fridge it stays fresh for about ten days. Just make sure it doesn't get too much air and doesn't get too dry.
Marcellina d'Angelis

one of the "marzipan fans out there"

Shire Isengau

Drachenwald

Date: Sat, 03 Nov 2001 19:23:21 -0500

From: Philip & Susan Troy

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] question for Master A


welsh10thcent at tds.net wrote:

> I am just starting to do marzipan and have talked with Olwen about this, i have a question that she said i should ask you.

>

> Can i use Almond flour, rosewater adn XXXXX sugar to make it or is almond flour a no no?



>

> Morvran


Well, I've used almond flour, and gotten what I considered to be good results. The marzipan for the ship subtlety (the marzipan/currant cake one, not the gingerbread one) was made that way. It worked fine, I think, producing a product that was slightly more grainy than modern commercial marzipan, not really sticky nor especially oily. The only thing I might warn people about is that using all rosewater as your liquid leads to a final product that is really powerfully flavored of rose. I found that diluting the rosewater somewhat with regular tap water, it was possible to taste both the almonds and the rosewater.
Give it a shot!
Adamantius

From: "Olwen the Odd"

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Food heraldry

Date: Tue, 11 Dec 2001 17:19:05 +0000
The way I cut matching shapes in marzipan is to first roll out the two or

three colours, the stamp out the shield blank shapes, lay them on top of

each other and cut them together. That way you don't have any gaps. If

possible I blow the picture of the device up and use a tracing wheel (yes

the kind for doing patterns) and run it along the line(s). If I am

freehanding it, well, I use a measuing device and a good guess. This method

should work in cheese and meats too. For purple.. hmm.. I don't think salami

would be purple enough unless you try slicing it and boiling it in red

cabbage. But then I'm not sure anyone would eat it. Good luck!!
Olwen
>That is so cool! We've got a Queen's day coming up, you don't mind if we swipe

>your idea do you? Our queen has sunnes-in-splendour on her personal armory,

>how do you recommend cutting wavy rays out of yellow cheese? Is salami close

>enough to purpure, do you think, or what other cold cut is there that looks

> more purple?

>

>Selene, Caid



From: welsh10thcent at tds.net

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2001 15:31:24 -0600

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Marzipan


Well for those of you who do marzipan we talked about the fact if you could

use almond flour, and well let me tell you, it works great, i made some

awesome for my first batch. it works great,
1# almond flour

1# XXXXXXXX sugar

water

almond flavor


that is what i used and it was great,
Morvran

From: "Olwen the Odd"

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Food Safety

Date: Wed, 30 Jan 2002 16:06:56 +0000
>Also, HOW to wash your hands,

>I've seen people look at me funny when I explain that

>wiping their hands dry on their apron after a quick

>rinse is not really a good idea....ewwwwwwwww.

>

>Alessandra


Although I am an 'apron wiper' for general quick washing (I worked for years

at a swimming pool), I also take seriously the importance of handwashing.

As you all know, I work in marzipan. Marzipan is very fickle. If there is

any hint of odor, dirt, colouration or _anything_ on your hands, gloves or

work surface it will *immediately* transfer to the marzipan.
Olwen

From: "Olwen the Odd"

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Almond Milk...place to find it

Date: Wed, 06 Feb 2002 18:47:44 +0000
>Hey Olwen- I've been wondering- Could you uses the almond sawdust from

>almond milk to make marzipan? Or doesn't it work anymore? Just curious.

>

>'Lainie
Good question 'Lainie. I honestly haven't tried but I would not think it



would work given that not only the flavor had been depleted buy I imagine it

went away with the oil. The oil is essential in marzipan. I suppose if one

were quite short of cash one could possibly get one good squeeze out of the

almonds and then turn them into marzipan. Perhaps if one added back some

almond oil to the mash...but I am just guessing here. Someday I may have to

try it.
Olwen

From: "Olwen the Odd"

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Back in Business!

Date: Mon, 07 Apr 2003 18:11:09 +0000


> I suspect this question has been answered before, but I can't find it,

> so I'll ask: how long does a can of almond paste keep? Does it

> deteriorate more rapidly if the can has been opened, but not all used?

> Does it need to be refrigerated after opening? Can it be frozen without

> affecting texture? These are all questions about the paste before it's

> been kneaded with sugar to make marzipan (that *is* how it's done, isn't

> it?). I'm not likely to use 7 pounds at once, should I ever try playing

> with it.

>

> Sandra
After opening a can of almond paste I have found it best to store it in good



freezer ziplock bags. You can weigh it out into portions, putting a pound

(or whatever) in seperate smaller bags and then place the burped, sealed

smaller bags into a larger one, basically double bagging. The paste can be

frozen for several months, perhaps up to a year, but I would really not know

having never kept it that long.
If you desire, you can do the same thing after you mix it with powdered

sugar and basically mixing up the marzipan.


You could choose to put the paste or marzipan in this double bag system and

elect to simply put it in the fridge. It will keep that way for a couple of

months as long as it is airtight. Add rosewater as needed for use rather

than adding the rose/orange water in the original mixing. The marzipan mix

would only be the almond paste and sugar. You can add colours at this stage

too. That way you have several bags of premade colour.


Olwen

Date: Wed, 21 May 2003 15:18:00 -0400

From: johnna holloway

To: "sca-cooks at ansteorra.org"

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Recipe for Olwen and Countess Alys
I came across the following recipe in April, but I forgot to

post it to the list then. When reading it I was reminded that

Olwen was looking for recipes that combined sugarpaste

and marzipan. This one combines those ingredients and

produces something that can be shaped. The question

would be --can we find one that leaves out the baking?


To make several pretty fancies.
Take sweet Almonds blanched and beaten

with Rosewater; mix them with fine sugar,

the whites of Eggs, and Gum dragon

steeped in Rosewater, and so make them into

what shape you please, and bake them. page 94.
The Cook's Guide: or, Rare receipts for cookery by

Hannah Wolley or Woolley. 1664.

Wing number W3276
Johnnae llyn Lewis Johnna Holloway

Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2003 15:18:18 +0000

From: "Olwen the Odd"

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] olwyn the odd... help?

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org
> we are going to make a bunch of almond milk for the feast and can the

> almond refuse be turned into marzipan?

>

> -- Pani Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, Knowledge Pika jenne at fiedlerfamily.net


As for your second question, the answer is no. All the oils are leached

right out of the nuts. You could perhaps use the remains for a garnish

sprinkled over a dish, just make sure you let folks know about the nuts.

You can take them home and use them for mincemeat pie, you can crush them

completely and incorporate them into a piecrust, you can put them in banana

nut bread, you can feed them to your chickens, you can add them to stuffing,

you can do lots of things with them but you can't make marzipan from

them.
Olwen

Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2003 22:18:11 -0400

From: "Robin Carroll-Mann"

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] olwyn the odd... help?

To: Cooks within the SCA


On 18 Sep 2003, at 10:22, AEllin Olafs dotter wrote:

> Jadwiga makes other sauces, too. They could make a marzipan sauce... to

> serve with the marzipan peacock...
It's not Spanish, but... the Neapolitan Recipe Collection has a recipe

For marzipan sauce. The marzipan is diluted with lemon juice and

Pomegranate juice, and flavored with ginger.
Brighid ni Chiarain *** mka Robin Carroll-Mann

Barony of Settmour Swamp, East Kingdom

Date: Fri, 19 Sep 2003 07:37:52 -0600

From: Sue Clemenger

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] olwyn the odd... help?

To: Cooks within the SCA


Here ya go, everyone. I'd saved it.

--maire, lover of pomegranates and almond anything!


> [111.] Sapore de marzapane. Piglia quatro dita de marzapane he

> pistalo cum uno poco de zenzaro bono, poi distempara cum suco de limoni

> he de granate dolce he forte; he sera bono sapore.

>

> (Marzipan Sauce. Get four fingers of marzipan, grind it up with a



> little good ginger and distemper it with lemon juice and strong, sweet

> pomegranate juice. This is a good sauce.)

>

> The Neapolitan Recipe Collection: Cuoco Napoletano



> Terence Scully, (trans.)

> University of Michigan Press

> ISBN: 0-472-10972-3

Date: Wed, 10 Mar 2004 14:44:37 +0000

From: "Olwen the Odd"

Subject: RE: [Sca-cooks] Marzipan question

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org
> Advice from the confectionary mavens, please!

>

> I am making some molded marzipan items for Coronation, which is (gulp!)



> three and a half weeks away. The marzipan is hmemade from equal parts

> almond and sugar. I intend to dry the pieces in a low oven.

>

> What is the best way to store the dried candies so that they will be at their



> best for the event? An air-tight container goes without saying, but

> should hey be refrigerated or frozen?

>

> Brighid ni Chiarain *** mka Robin Carroll-Mann


Why are you drying them in an oven? You run a risk of them either cracking

or getting so rock hard they will be uneatable. You will be best off by

leaving them to dry on wax or parchment paper lightly covered with a clean

cloth or paper. Depending on the density you may need to turn the pieces

over. There is plenty of time for them to air dry properly. As for

storage, you can either leave them in a air-tight container or ziplock in

the refrgerator or, I usually just leave them out. Make sure they are

completely dry before packaging them though or you will get moisture in the

bag or container. If they start to crack when drying you can mist them

lightly with rose or orange flower water and rub that into the surface a

bit. Since the event is so close you should not go with freezing. You may

end up collecting moisture and have to re-dry the things again.


What kind of shapes are you making? Have you used molds for marzipan

before? The trick, if you haven't, is to gently dab some marzipan into the

mold to get a good covering of almond oil in there. Some folks will tell

you to coat the mold with powdered sugar. I have not had success doing

that. Also, to get the 'pan out of the mold, get a small pick or tiny knife

tip to slide in just enough to break the suction, then the product will

fall/bang right out.
Olwen

Date: Wed, 10 Mar 2004 11:48:19 -0500 (GMT-05:00)

From: Robin Carroll-Mann

Subject: RE: [Sca-cooks Marzipan question

To: Cooks within the SCA
-----Original Message-----

From: Olwen the Odd


> Why are you drying them in an oven? You run a risk of them either

> cracking or getting so rock hard they will be uneatable.


Wasn't that the period practice? "Stoving" them?
> What kind of shapes are yu making?
Shells, leaves, maybe some flowers - mostly small, flat shapes.
> Have you used molds for marzipan before? The trick, if you haven't, is to

> gently dab some marzipan into the mold to get a good covering of almond oil

> in there.

> Some folks will tell you to coat the mold with powdered sugar. I have

> not had success doing that.
My only experience with molds has been making peach-pits. I do find

sugar on the pre-molded lump is helpful. Last night, I tried rubbing

some almond oil on the mold, but it didn't make any noticeable

difference.


Thank you for the tips.
Brighid ni Chiarain

Date: Sat, 27 Nov 2004 11:48:49 -0700

From: Mary Morman

Subject: [Sca-coos] marzepan from munich

To: SCA-Cooks
Adamantius wrote:

"If you don't mind my asking, why do you want to buy it in Munich and go to the trouble of getting that much of it home, when you should be able

to get it more or less locally? If nothing else, I'll bet there's a

SCAdian who'd be glad to make it for you at cost or for a sufficiently

low markup as to make it cheaper, more convenient, and at no lesser

quality than an imported product?"


I often go to the UK, most often York, at this time of year and have

found that the marzipan that I buy from confectioners there is far

superior to anything I'm able to buy here in Colorado. So I figured

that it was a "European" thing and that since I'm going to Munich this

year instead of the UK that I'd try to get a batch there and bring it

home to use for my 12th night feast.


Elaina

Date: Sun, 28 Nov 2004 14:10:43 -0500

From: "The Borg"

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Cookie Exchange

To: , "Cooks withinthe SCA"


Ok, I have four participants so far. Here they are with dates.
Elewyiss (me) Dec 21

William de Grandfort (Chris Stanifr)

Lonnie Harvel

AEsa (RJ) Dec 10


This means we have 20 days left. Lonnie was going to look at her

calander


and pick a date, and William did not list one. Did you have one or

should we

reach in the hat for you?
If I'm butting in and taking over jut let me know. I'll back off.
Elewyiss
Date: Sun, 28 Nov 204 20:44:30 +0100

From: Fred Schwohl

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Re: Marzipan in Munich

To: "sca-cooks at ansteorra.org"


Let me offer some humble advice on buying Marzipan in Germany,

especially in Munich.


First, you might consider not to buy confectioned Marzipan which is

available in Standard stores throughout the country, but for your task so

called "Marzipn Rohmasse" is much better to be used. This pre-fabricated

mass consists of almonds and sugar only, mostly in a 60:40 ratio

(60% almonds), thus enabling you to get the final product to your

taste with ease. You should evade all products containing other ingredients

like Invertase, Coloring or other additives as these show a low Quality product.
Pre-fabricated products you can buy from the shelf here are not necessarily

easy to use or to bring in shape and mostly are containing to much sugar for

my tast.
As Marzipan is somehow regarded as a German Speciality (according to some

sources the main reason for that is the fact that after it´s long history

dating back to the romans and later to Venice it was later regarded as a

Royal Treat due to the high pice for imported sugar from sugar cane, a fact

which changed after blocked imports to Europe during Napoleon´s era and

cheap new sources for Sugar where found in the sugar beet by the German

Scientist Andreas Marggraf in 1747. In 1801 the first factory or beet sugar

was build in Cunern in Lower Silesia in the north eastern part of Germany

(well it was Prussia then, but please do not bother with details :o) ) and

in 1806 import of cane sugar into Europe had dropped nearly to zero.


The Best German Maripan comes still from the northern part of the country

and Brand names as "Niederegger" or "Schwermer" are famous for their

products. This might have to do with the fact that they use a large quantity

of high quality almonds from Italy and Spain insteadof the more easily

available but less palatable almonds from other countries.
The mentioned "Marzipan Rohmasse" is available in most larger Warehouses in

the area the baking utensils are stored and there are various brands



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