Marzipan-msg 7/25/10



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> Olwen answered Margaret with:

> > >Olwen, do you use fondant in your marzipan, and if so, what proportions?

> > >

> > >Margaret, who is missing the annual marzipan-making weekend with Grandpa



> > >rather acutely this year

> >


> > No. I don't use fondant.

>

> Huh, What's "fondant"?



>

> Stefan li Rous


Another nifty thing you can do with sugar. There are two types. What I am

talking about is cooked fondant--you cook sugar and water and corn syrup

or cream of tartar to soft ball stage, let it cool completely, then

beat it until white. This is the sort of fondant you find as candy cream

filling.
The other kind is the rolled fondant that gets put on cakes, which

includes white vegetable fat and glycerine as well as sugar and

gelatine.
Margaret

Date: Mon, 24 Sep 2001 13:51:03 -0700 (PDT)

From: Nelson Beth

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Playing with Marzipan....

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org
I started looking for a recipe to give you but found

this instead. It's a pretty good description.


Orlaith
http://www.pastrywiz.com/season/fondant.htm says
Fondant is a sugar syrup that is crystallized to a

smooth, creamy white mass and is used for both icing

cakes and cake decorations. The cooked Fondant

(European Fondant) is quite difficult to make but is

the best Fondant recipe around due to its elasticity

and smoothness.

European Fondant is made by boiling sugar, water and

glucose to 240F. It is then poured onto a marble slap

and sprinkle with some water to prevent

crystallization. Once the syrup has cooled down to

110F, start to work the sugar with a steel scraper,

folding it onto itself. Do not attempt to work it

before it cooled to 110=B0F or it will become tough and

coarse. After a while it will start turning white.

Work the fondant until it is smooth and creamy. It may

take well over 40 minutes to achieve the right

consistency. Once smooth and creamy store in an

airtight container for later use. European Fondant

should NOT be attempted by inexperienced pastry chefs

without the appropriate supervision, as you may burn

yourself badly.
European Fondant is not rolled fondant. Fondant

originates from "fondre" - to melt and is a soft

creamy preparation of sugar, water, and flavoring.

Rolled Fondant is a Canadian term for Sugarpaste,

which is a different product. Read about Sugarpaste.
Uncooked Fondant is made by simply mixing all

ingredients together.

Date: Mon, 24 Sep 2001 16:03:51 -0500 (CDT)

From: "Pixel, Goddess and Queen"


To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Playing with Marzipan....
On Mon, 24 Sep 2001, Nelson Beth wrote:

> I started looking for a recipe to give you but found

> this instead. It's a pretty good description.

>

> Orlaith



>

> http://www.pastrywiz.com/season/fondant.htm says

>

> Fondant is a sugar syrup that is crystallized to a



> smooth, creamy white mass and is used for both icing

> cakes and cake decorations. The cooked Fondant

> (European Fondant) is quite difficult to make but is

> the best Fondant recipe around due to its elasticity

> and smoothness.

Note that a Kitchen-Aid substitutes nicely for the scraper and marble

slab, for those of us who don't have room to store large slabs of marble

nor places to put them when they are in use.
I find the assurances that this is difficult amusing, since Grandpa taught

me the fondant-making process when I was twelve. Ok, so I'm a mutant.


Margaret

From: "Elise Fleming"

To:

Date: Mon, 24 Sep 2001 19:51:02 -0500

Subject: [Sca-cooks] Re: Playing With Marzipan
Greetings. If you really want to see some fantabulous marzipan

creations, find a copy of _Decorations, Borders and Letters,

Marzipan, and Modern Desserts_ by Bilheux and Escoffier. It is one

of the volumes of the Professional French Pastry Series. The book

may be out of print now. The copyright in mine is 1988. However,

the contents are "wowzer"! The marzipan section contains how to

make flowers, how to paint on colors white marzipan, making leaves,

inscriptions on marzipan parchment, making sculptures and applying

color, making fruits and vegetables and steop-by-step instructions

to make cutesy animals. You can get some marvelous ideas!


The wild part about this book (and the others in the series) is the

final section of photographs and descriptions of entries in a

food-related competition, the Charles Proust. The entries are

unbelievable.


I don't know if this would be available in a library, or if one

could request it on one of those "hard to find" book web sites. The

original was about $70.
Alys Katharine

From: "Olwen the Odd"

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Re: Sca-cooks digest, Vol 1 #679 - 16 msgs

Date: Tue, 25 Sep 2001 14:00:28 +0000
>And the brand name is?
Hmmm. I'm at work now so if memory serves I believe that the brand name now

is K & K. They are pretty much the same though.


>BTW - I understand that you need to store the marzipan so it doesn't go

>hard. Is it like some of the Candy recipes I've read that you need to store

>it with Silica Gel to keep out the moisture, or is a well-sealed container

>stored in a cool, dry place sufficient??


I stick it in a zipper bag and pop them into the drawer at the bottom of my

fridge. I do keep it either in bags or covered with a cloth when I have the

lump out that I am working with. The surface will get stiff but can be

caressed and made soft again. The finished pieces I either leave out for a

while to set up or I cover, depending on how hard I want/need the

presentation to be. The peach pits, for instance, I leave sit out and get

fairly hard. That way transporting them to a feast is as simple as tossing

them in a bag and they won't mash. The roses I do I leave set out for while

but the petals are so thin that if they dry out too much the edges crack so

I pop them into a tupperware container.


>Mari

Date: Tue, 25 Sep 2001 10:44:24 -0400

From: Elaine Koogler

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Re: Sca-cooks digest, Vol 1 #679 - 16 msgs
I actually froze some of the marzipan I purchased from Bakers Catalogue...and,

when thawed, did not seem the worse for wear. It was sealed very tightly to

avoid freezer burn.
Kiri

From: "Olwen the Odd"

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Playing with Marzipan....

Date: Tue, 25 Sep 2001 01:09:29 +0000
>I don't know, dear...I think Olwen's the Resident Expert on Things

>Marzipan. I have managed to make marzipan acorns, and they tasted just

>fine, but didn't look hugely impressive, and that's about it.....

>--Maire
You could have added just a bit of acorn flour to that mix and it would have

given that nice bitterness. Just add water instead of rosewater for the

moisture and a little more sugar.


Olwen

From: "Olwen the Odd"

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] REC: LARDED MILK...BACON

Date: Tue, 25 Sep 2001 17:13:23 +0000
When I ran marzipan through my pasta machine I simply dusted the rollers and

the rolled out marzipan with powdered sugar. I made the greatest looking

fettucine. Made "meatballs" too! I even dried some pretty hard and grated it

and put it in a small bowl as parmesan. Put them out on a buffet table.

Then I sat back and had a good laugh.
Tried the playdough presses too. It worked but I'm more hands on.

Olwen


From: "Olwen the Odd"

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Marzipan roses

Date: Mon, 01 Oct 2001 19:56:06 +0000


> > And thank you for the complement. They are dead easy to make. So

> > much easier than the piped frosting ones!

> > Olwen

>

>Oh, I like dead easy. I can only guess at how to hand-assemble



>something like that. May we know the arcane secret?

>

>Iyad ibn Bisharo / Thr=E1inn Tj=FAguskegg


Using gel colouring select the colour you want and mix it thoroughly into

the marzipan. Pinch off a section and form the cone, just like you would in

frosting. Between pieces of wax paper place a bit of marzipan and with your

finger as the rolling (pushing) pin spread out a piece about one to one and

a half inches long and about three quarters inch tall. Unpeel it from the

wax paper and beginning with the center petals begin wrapping and pinching

it around the cone. Keep adding more rows of petals till you are happy.

Cut off any remaining base after the marzipan begins to set up a bit. Dead

easy.
Olwen

From: "Olwen the Odd"

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] OLWEN'S MARZIPAN

Date: Mon, 15 Oct 2001 18:15:44 +0000
>Olwen,

>I have been meaning to ask you all through this thread: do you make your

>own marzipan or do you buy it in little cans? I was wondering because the

>little cans can get awfully expensive.

>

>But now you have me thinking of marzipan playtime.



>Do you have a favorite recipe for making the marzipan?

>And (and I might have missed this) How & where do you keep the left over

>marzipan or marzipan for long term storage. And what is considered long

>term?
>Phillipa


I have made my own marzipan from scratch. It is a not that much fun and is

costly. I get almond paste in #10 cans, which is 7 pounds of paste, at

Restaraunt Depot. That is a restaurant supply house. I mix the 7 pounds of

paste with 7 pounds of powdered sugar in Master Chirharts kitchenaide. It

is great fun and very messy. I store the marzipan in ziplock bags in the

vegetable bin in the fridge. It can keep up to a year or so if you have it

that long. I make and use somewhere in the area of 60 to 80 pounds of

marzipan a year. This year you can add at least 24 more pounds to that as I

have a rather daunting soltie planned for 12th night. It is my

understanding, although I have never used it, that the stuff that comes

premade in those little expensive plastic tubes is not very conducive to

molding with. Having never used it I am not sure that adding a little more

powdered sugar to it may stiffen it up enough to be more user friendly. It

may be worth a try.


Olwen

From: "Olwen the Odd"

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: Re[2]: [Sca-cooks] OLWEN'S MARZIPAN

Date: Mon, 15 Oct 2001 20:58:56 +0000
>Had to buy 'em at W*l-M*rt. Not cheap, but I now have marzipan.

>Sticky, questionable, stubborn, freaky marzipan, but marzipan

>nonetheless. I don't think the rose thing's gonna work, so I'll just

>make bunches of grapes. They're easy.

>____________________________________________________________________

>Iyad ibn Bisharo / Thr=E1inn Tj=FAguskegg


Sticky? Did you weigh the ground almond paste? You have to add the same

amount of (weighed) powdered sugar. Then if it is too stiff add a few drops

of rose water. If yours is sticky try adding some more powdered sugar to a

bit of it and see how it improves. It should be fairly stiff to hold it's

shape. Stiffer for some shapes.
Olwen

From: "Olwen the Odd"

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] OLWEN'S MARZIPAN

Date: Tue, 16 Oct 2001 16:07:15 +0000
>olwentheodd at hotmail.com writes:

><< You can ask a a patissarie or a place that does wedding cakes where they get

> their almond paste or marzipan in bulk. As for the colouring, use a gel

> rather than the water based ones you get at the grocery store. They work

> better and don't stain everything and run colours and they don't affect

> the marzipan with added moisture.

> Olwen >>

>

>Olwen, I have also used the paste colours to no ill effects. Though I do



>admit to using gloves when kneading the colours in. I just don't like my

>hands being stained 4-5 different combinations of colours.

>

>Finnebhir


When using the gel paste colour the colour does not transfer to my hands.

Unlike the water based stuff you get in the grocer which stains everything.

Everyone can tell when we make those apple eggs cuz our hands are all yellow

and red :-( Some folks use gloves. Some folks use baggies. Some folks are

more hands on, like me. I use gloves only when I am in the final stages of

a hand modeled figure to avoid prints.


Olwen

From: "Olwen the Odd"

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: Re[4]: [Sca-cooks] OLWEN'S MARZIPAN

Date: Tue, 16 Oct 2001 16:55:19 +0000
> > If yours is sticky try adding some more powdered sugar to a bit of

> > it and see how it improves.

>

>That did it. Thanks! Turned out to be little more than equal parts



>of each. Best going theory (thanks Johnnae!) is that the recent --

>current -- damp weather had rendered it limp. A little extra dry

>ingredient evened it out. Still soft, but no longer sticky. Softness

>can be taken care of by leaving it out uncovered for a while, right?

>

>Iyad
Leaving it out will give it a crust. Put it in the fridge. The cold will



stiffen it up some. After it is molded you can leave it sitting out to firm

up. You may have to add a little more sugar for thinner parts.

Glad it's working for you! Have fun.
Olwen

Date: Wed, 17 Oct 2001 20:41:09 -0500 (CDT)

From: "Pixel, Goddess and Queen"

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Marzipan creations, like onions...
> I would LOVE some marzipan so I

> could taste it and get an idea of what it tastes and looks like before I

> *attempt* (yes, ATTEMPT) to do marzipan.

>

> Misha


You've had sweet rolls with almond goo in them? Kind of like that. Sweet

and almond-y, with just a faint hint of roses.


If you don't feel like trying to kill a KitchenAid (I burned out the fuse

on one once) you can knead the almond paste and the sugar together with

your hands (equal weights almond paste and icing sugar, with a bit of

rosewater in that great medieval measure called "some" which is usually

about a half to a whole teaspoon per pound of paste), start working

the almond paste first so it's soft when you add the sugar. Grandpa always

stored his fondant and the almond paste on the unheated back porch--cold

fondant and cold almond paste is *not* fun to knead. Depending on the kind

you get, it may be kind of hard with a tendency to crumble when it's

cold. Some varieties of paste may be softer.


If you are kneading it by hand, you'll want some sort of scraper when it

inevitably sticks to the table/counter/pastry board/marble slab/generic

kneading surface. Just keep mushing it together until it's all smooth and

uniform, not streaky with unmixed sugar and paste.


Once it's mixed thoroughly, then you can add your color if that's what

you're doing, gradually in small amounts as Olwen has already said. If you

get pre-mixed from Olwen, you'll just have to color and shape it. I can

give you directions to make fruits, if you like, which is a traditional

thing to do with marzipan. And potatoes, which although not fruits,

are dead easy. The only thing easier, not counting mixing in the color,

are oranges.
Sheesh. Now I'm going to have to see where I can get almond paste. Olwen,

this is *your* fault. ;-)


Margaret

Date: Wed, 17 Oct 2001 08:11:42 -0700 (PDT)

From: Jennifer Whitbeck

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Marzipan creations, & experiments

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org
I asked opinions a while back about using one of those

old-style "meat" grinders to grind almonds for

marzipan, since I had recently acquired one with a

"nut butters" attachment. (I know it's far easier to

buy the stuff, but I like this sort of experimenting.)

Well, I finally got off my duff, blanched some almonds

and tried it out. Though somewhat more messy, it

definitely yielded smoother results than the food

processor. (Quote from fiance; "Hey, that's so much

smoother than the other stuff you've made!") ;->


Now, I've started playing with molds too... I found

one interesting product I played with this week;

Crayola's Model Magic. I read it was non-toxic and

non-sticking, so I thought I'd see how it stood up to

making molds for marzipan. Preliminary results might

be promising, so that prompted me to write the list

about it.
It didn't turn out how I expected. I cast two things:

an acorn and a plastic chess piece. Apart from being

non-toxic, I picked it because it said it was an

air-drying modelling clay. It was weird stuff; felt

like I was trying to mold marshmallows! It seems that

it does "dry", but it doesn't really harden. Now that

the test molds are dry, they're like a solid foam and

retain they're shape (acorn, chess piece) after

squeezing. I found when I tried molding marzipan into

them, the mold was pliable enough to flex and help pop

the marzipan out.
I think I'd rather try some stiffer, real clay, before

deciding what I preferred, but I thought this might be

useful info if anyone was looking for a more flexible

mold material that was non-toxic.

Date: Wed, 17 Oct 2001 22:10:13 -0400

From: johnna holloway

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Marzipan creations, & experiments


Jennifer's comments about molds reminded me that

Beryl's Cake Decorating and Pastry Supplies

catalogue was advertising a product called

CREATE-A-MOLD. It's a reuseable non-toxic

molding gel that can be melted in the microwave.

See it at: http://beryls.safeshopper.com/130/4850.htm?452

or at http://www.beryls.com/mainpage.htm.

It's priced at $15 for 8.5 ounces.

Has anyone tried this???

She also sells silicone plastique for molding.


Johnnae llyn Lewis Johnna Holloway

Date: Wed, 17 Oct 2001 11:40:05 -0500

From: Amanda Whiteley

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Marzipan creations, like onions...

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org
A lot of cake decorating supply places, especially those specializing in

wedding cake supplies, supply almond paste for a quick and dirty start on

marzipan. Here in Winnipeg, I just trot down the road to Evelyn's.
Sian

Date: Thu, 18 Oct 2001 12:41:38 -0400

From: Philip & Susan Troy

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Marzipan creations, like onions...
Olwen the Odd wrote:

>> For those who have worked with Marzipan before, I present a question:Is it

>> easier and/or better to work with the almond paste or the homemade

>> made-from-scratch? The recipe I have is the homemade stuff.

>>

>> Misha


>

> Trust me Misha, opening a can of almond paste and mixing it with sugar and

> rosewater is SOOOOOO much easier than blanching and grinding almonds and

> THEN mixing with sugar and rosewater. I do think the experience is worth it

> though.

>

> Since I use 60 to 80 pounds of marzipan (at least) a year I would be



> grinding almonds in my spare time and my sleep if I did not use the cans.

> Olwen
Olwen, have you investigated the almond flour sometimes found in Indian or Middle eastern markets? ISTR getting it for about $5 a pound (maybe less), mixing it with an equal amount of powdered sugar and enough diluted rosewater to moisten it all to a cohesive state when mixed and kneaded. It made an ever so slightly coarser version of marzipan, not especially sticky (there was just a hint of released almond oil, which combatted that). I suspect that what I ended up with was perhaps not quite as fine as a modern commercial product, but very possibly as fine, or very nearly so, as a hand-made period product. And then, how well my cost compares to your method, I have no idea.


Adamantius

Date: Thu, 18 Oct 2001 14:53:20 -0400

From: Philip & Susan Troy

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Marzipan creations, like onions...
Olwen the Odd wrote:

>> Olwen, have you investigated the almond flour sometimes found in Indian or

>> Middle eastern markets? ISTR getting it for about $5 a pound (maybe less),

>> mixing it with an equal amount of powdered sugar and enough diluted

>> rosewater to moisten it all to a cohesive state when mixed and kneaded. It

>> made an ever so slightly coarser version of marzipan, not especially

>> sticky

>> (there was just a hint of released almond oil, which combatted that). I

>> suspect that what I ended up with was perhaps not quite as fine as a

>> modern

>> commercial product, but very possibly as fine, or very nearly so, as a

>> hand-made period product. And then, how well my cost compares to your

>> method, I have no idea.

>>

>> Adamantius



>

> I have never heard of it. I shall have to investigate. Thanks for the tip.

> If I get hold of any I'll experiment and let you know.

> Olwen
The people I buy it from, Patel Brothers in NYC, have a web site, but the web site doesn't mention anything about almond flour. On the other hand, these people do:

http://www.almondsonline.com/
They appear to sell a 3-lb. bag of almond flour for $8.95, and I believe

they also sell larger bags, such as 5 and 10 pound bags, for

commensurately cheaper.
Assuming a test batch made with a 3-lb bag, a similar amount of sugar, and a negligible amount of rose water, we're looking at around $2 or less per pound of finished product. Not counting shipping costs, simply because I don't know what they are.
Adamantius

Date: Thu, 18 Oct 2001 21:53:37 +0200

From: Volker Bach

To: sca-cooks at ansteorra.org

Subject: Re: [Sca-cooks] Marzipan creations, like onions...
Mike Macchione schrieb:

> I've been thinking about this all throughout this thread, and this thread

> just prompted me to ask.... Just how common were marzipan subtleties in



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