Marshall ela block 7



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MARSHALL ELA BLOCK 7


Monday, 3-2-15

Monday, 3-2-15

Informational text and argument on dangers of football for adolescents.

 Monday, 02 March, 2015   English Language Arts Block Lesson Plan  Marshall    P ½ Reg., P ¾ 5/6 ACC*

                                                                              
OBJECTIVES
Unit: Read and comprehend informational and narrative passages; determine central ideas and supporting details.  Create and support an argument.  Understand and use higher-level academic vocabulary; understand figurative language.

Today:  Use higher-level academic vocabulary; determine central ideas and supporting details; Create an argument.  Assess knowledge on Greek and Latin Vocabulary Unit 13.



MATERIALS
Warm-up sheet, SSR novel, SSR Response Log, ELA notebook, general school supplies, Unit 13 Greek and Latin Vocabulary Quiz, Scholastic Scope Magazine article, "Should Kids Play Football?" (print and .pdf version for overhead display during close reading) and supporting materials (vocabulary practice, finding and using text evidence scaffold, and argument building scaffold).

VOCABULARY
Today's reading:  rakes (v.)   enrollment   lapses   sustained   reap   thrived   concussion
Unit 13:  jubilee   jubilant   hilarity   exhilarating   fruitful   frugal   celebratory   celebrant   celebrity   illusion   delude
 
AGENDA & CLASS BUSINESS & WEEKLY NEWS
Personnelmen hand out graded work.  Students add own spelling and grammar issues on p. 43 for practice.
Review daily announcements.
Reminders about upcoming due dates.  Turn in Unit 13.
Teacher will provide days available for after school assistance this week for planning.

INTRODUCTION
Students will write daily objective in planner & answer QOD (assess background knowledge):
If we banned football for youth, what else might be banned?  Would that be fair?

PROCEDURES
First period of each block:
Review QOD as a class.
Personnelmen will distribute Scholastic Scope Magazine for access to:  "Should Kids Play Football?"
Teacher will ask if any questions remain on vocabulary words prior to students completing practice on the words.
Class will review the debate:  Should kids play football, or is it too dangerous?
Students will continue to build an argument essay with supporting details.
The Write and Argument Essay scaffold will be utilized to guide students, and can be used as each student feels the need.

Second period of each block:
Assessment on Unit 13 Greek and Latin Vocabulary:
SSR (Sustained Silent Reading on a grade level (or above) novel of student choice.
Response to reading (students choose from 21 questions to answer regarding their novel).

CLOSURE
If your favorite sport was illegal for you to play, what would you do?

HOMEWORK
Book projects due 06 March.
Typed or handwritten argument essay due 05 March (gened)
 
ASSESSMENT
QOD responses; SSR responses, closure responses, Unit 13 Quiz, student comments and discussion, comprehension checks.
 
DIFFERENTIATION
Essay scaffolds provide students the assistance needed to build an essay if they choose to use them - student choice.
Students determine which side of a debate to write about and support.
Students choose from enumerable grade level novels for SSR - student choice.
Students choose which book will be used for book project.
Students will choose among twenty projects, and mix and match menu items for possible points (300) for a truly unique project.

TEXT INFORMATION

Complexity Factors



 

See how this text will challenge your students.

Levels of Meaning/Purpose

The debate has a clear purpose: to present readers with arguments for and against football as a sport for kids.

Structure

The debate includes narrative and informational passages. Information supporting both sides of the argument are woven throughout the text.

Language Conventionality and Clarity


  • Vocabulary: higher-level academic vocabulary includes crisis, reap, and thrived.

  • Figurative Language: figures of speech (e.g. “the NFL rakes in more than $9 billion”); rhetorical questions (“If we got rid of football, where would we draw the line?”)

Knowledge Demands

General knowledge of the game of football will aid comprehension. Also, the text makes reference to aggression, depression, and brain damage; familiarity with these terms is necessary for full comprehension. 



Lexile: 910L

Skills and Standards



 

Common Core ELA Anchor Standards: R1, R2, R6, R8, W1, W4, W5, W7, W10, SL1, L1, L2, L3, L4, L6

Related Standards/Objectives: SL.7.1d, SL.7.3, RI.7.1, RI.7.2, RI.7.4, RI.7.10, W.7.1, W.7.1a, W.7.1b, W.7.1c, W.7.1d, W.7.1e, W.7.4, W.7.5, W.7.9, W.7.9b, L.7.2, L.7.2b, L.7.5a

Tuesday, 3-3-15

Informational text and argument on dangers of football for adolescents.

 Tuesday, 03 March, 2015   English Language Arts Block Lesson Plan  Marshall    P ½ Reg., P ¾ 5/6 ACC*

                                                                              
OBJECTIVES
Unit: Read and comprehend informational and narrative passages; determine central ideas and supporting details.  Create and support an argument.  Understand and use higher-level academic vocabulary; understand figurative language.

Today:  Assess knowledge on informative/narrative text and higher-level academic vocabulary; create an argument. 



MATERIALS
Warm-up sheet, SSR novel, SSR Response Log, ELA notebook, general school supplies, Unit 13 Greek and Latin Vocabulary Quiz, Scholastic Scope Magazine article, "Should Kids Play Football?" (print and .pdf version for overhead display during close reading) and supporting materials (vocabulary practice, finding and using text evidence scaffold, and argument building scaffold), assessment on reading and vocabulary.

VOCABULARY
Today's reading:  rakes (v.)   enrollment   lapses   sustained   reap   thrived   concussion
 
AGENDA & CLASS BUSINESS & WEEKLY NEWS
Personnelmen hand out graded work.  Students add own spelling and grammar issues on p. 43 for practice.
Review daily announcements.
Reminders about upcoming due dates; collect immigrant essays.
Teacher will provide days available for after school assistance this week for planning.

INTRODUCTION
Students will write daily objective in planner & answer QOD:
Do you think the author of the reading was taking a side on the debate?

PROCEDURES
First period of each block:
Review QOD as a class.
Personnelmen will distribute Scholastic Scope Magazine for access to:  "Should Kids Play Football?"
Students will finish argument essays.
Essays will be turned in at the end of this class.

Second period of each block:
Assessment on the reading this week.
SSR (Sustained Silent Reading on a grade level (or above) novel of student choice.

CLOSURE
Write a sentence using the word 'reap' properly in context.

HOMEWORK
Book projects due 06 March.
Typed or handwritten argument essay due 05 March (gened)
 
ASSESSMENT
QOD responses; SSR responses, closure responses, assessment results, argument essay, immigrant essay, student comments and discussion, comprehension checks.
 
DIFFERENTIATION
Essay scaffolds provide students the assistance needed to build an essay if they choose to use them - student choice.
Students choose which essay question to answer on the assessment.
Students determine which side of a debate to write about and support.
Students choose from enumerable grade level novels for SSR - student choice.
Students choose which book will be used for book project.
Students will choose among twenty projects, and mix and match menu items for possible points (300) for a truly unique project.

TEXT INFORMATION

Complexity Factors



 

See how this text will challenge your students.

Levels of Meaning/Purpose

The debate has a clear purpose: to present readers with arguments for and against football as a sport for kids.

Structure

The debate includes narrative and informational passages. Information supporting both sides of the argument are woven throughout the text.

Language Conventionality and Clarity


  • Vocabulary: higher-level academic vocabulary includes crisis, reap, and thrived.

  • Figurative Language: figures of speech (e.g. “the NFL rakes in more than $9 billion”); rhetorical questions (“If we got rid of football, where would we draw the line?”)

Knowledge Demands

General knowledge of the game of football will aid comprehension. Also, the text makes reference to aggression, depression, and brain damage; familiarity with these terms is necessary for full comprehension. 



Lexile: 910L

Skills and Standards



 

Common Core ELA Anchor Standards: R1, R2, R6, R8, W1, W4, W5, W7, W10, SL1, L1, L2, L3, L4, L6

Related Standards/Objectives: SL.7.1d, SL.7.3, RI.7.1, RI.7.2, RI.7.4, RI.7.10, W.7.1, W.7.1a, W.7.1b, W.7.1c, W.7.1d, W.7.1e, W.7.4, W.7.5, W.7.9, W.7.9b, L.7.2, L.7.2b, L.7.5a, L.7.1

Wednesday, 3-4-15

Using the library; discussion on failure and writing a speech.

 Wednesday, 04 March, 2015   English Language Arts Block Lesson Plan  Marshall    P ½ Reg., P ¾ 5/6 ACC*

                                                                              
OBJECTIVES
Unit: Understand how to use the library; building interest in reading.  Write grade level pieces addressing a specific topic.

Today:  Visit the library; learn how to best use library resources.  Read a short infographic; begin to write a short speech.



MATERIALS
Warm-up sheet, SSR novel, SSR Response Log, ELA notebook, general school supplies, Scholastic Scope Magazine article, "You Write It: Failure," "Why Pigs Rule," Supporting a Claim - Turning an Infographic Into a Speech, and library resources.

VOCABULARY
Today's reading:  failure  resilient  grit  shortcomings

PROCEDURES
First period of each block:
Meet in the library; engage with librarian's lesson for today.
 
Second period of each block:
Meet in 724.

AGENDA & CLASS BUSINESS & WEEKLY NEWS
Personnelmen hand out graded work.  Students add own spelling and grammar issues on p. 43 for practice.
Review daily announcements.
Teacher will provide days available for after school assistance this week for planning.

INTRODUCTION
Students will write daily objective in planner & answer QOD:
Do you think failure can be a benefit?  Explain.
Obtain Scope Magazine, and turn to the back "You Write It: Failure."
Read and understand infographic and facts in preparation to write a short speech.
View exemplar text:  "Why Pigs Rule," and mentor sample.
Get together with a partner to prepare a one minute speech.
Prepare to deliver quick speeches to class tomorrow.
SSR (Sustained Silent Reading on a grade level (or above) novel of student choice.
Respond to reading passage.

CLOSURE
What one failure do you now see as a possible positive event?

HOMEWORK
Book projects due 06 March.
Typed or handwritten argument essay due 05 March (gened)
 
ASSESSMENT
QOD responses; SSR responses, closure responses, dyad work and communication, speeches.
 
DIFFERENTIATION
Students determine with whom to work on a speech.
Dyads decide how to organize a speech - no parameters given.
Students choose from enumerable grade level novels for SSR - student choice.
Students choose which book will be used for book project.
Students will choose among twenty projects, and mix and match menu items for possible points (300) for a truly unique project.

Related Standards/Objectives: SL.7.1d, W.7.7, W.7.9, SL.7.1b, SL.7.1, SL.7.3, SL.7.6, L.7.1, L.7.3

Wednesday, 3-4-15

New Calendar Item

Thursday, 3-5-15

Infographic on failure and writing a speech.

 Thursday, 05 March, 2015   English Language Arts Block Lesson Plan  Marshall    P ½ Reg., P ¾ 5/6 ACC*

                                                                              


OBJECTIVES
Unit: Write grade level pieces addressing a specific topic; write and deliver speech. Understand basic components of effective presentation.

Today:  Read a short infographic (understand textual and visual information); summarize and paraphrase; write a short speech.



MATERIALS
Warm-up sheet, SSR novel, SSR Response Log, ELA notebook, general school supplies, Scholastic Scope Magazine article, "You Write It: Failure," "Why Pigs Rule," and Supporting a Claim - Turning an Infographic Into a Speech.

VOCABULARY
Today's reading:  failure  resilient  grit  shortcomings

PROCEDURES
First period of each block:
Meet in the library; engage with librarian's lesson for today.
 
Second period of each block:
Meet in 724.

AGENDA & CLASS BUSINESS & WEEKLY NEWS
Personnelmen hand out graded work.  Students add own spelling and grammar issues on p. 43 for practice.
Review daily announcements.
Teacher will provide days available for after school assistance this week for planning.

INTRODUCTION
Students will write daily objective in planner & answer QOD:
What are some things to remember when presenting a speech?
Obtain Scope Magazine, and turn to the back "You Write It: Failure."
Read and understand infographic and facts in preparation to write a short speech.
Review exemplar text:  "Why Pigs Rule," and mentor sample.
Get together with a partner to prepare a one minute speech, using the scaffold if desired.
Prepare to deliver quick speeches to class tomorrow.
SSR (Sustained Silent Reading on a grade level (or above) novel of student choice.
Respond to reading passage.

CLOSURE
Will your audience be convinced that failure is a positive?  How?

HOMEWORK
Book projects due tomorrow.
 
ASSESSMENT
QOD responses; SSR responses, closure responses, scaffold entries, dyad work and communication, speeches.
 
DIFFERENTIATION
Students determine with whom to work on a speech, or may work alone if desired.
Dyads decide how to organize a speech - no parameters given.
Students choose from enumerable grade level novels for SSR - student choice.
Students choose which book will be used for book project.
Students will choose among twenty projects, and mix and match menu items for possible points (300) for a truly unique project.

Related Standards/Objectives: SL.7.1d, W.7.7, W.7.9, SL.7.1b, SL.7.1, SL.7.3, SL.7.6, L.7.1, L.7.3

Friday, 3-6-15

Deliver speeches; understanding text evidence.

 Friday, 06 March, 2015   English Language Arts Block Lesson Plan  Marshall    P ½ Reg., P ¾ 5/6 ACC*

                                                                              


OBJECTIVES
Unit:  Understand how to better use the library.  Write a short speech; understand components of presenting.

Today:  Deliver a short speech; practice listening skills.



MATERIALS
Warm-up sheet, SSR novel, SSR Response Log, ELA notebook, general school supplies, and Scholastic Scope Magazine article, "You Write It: Failure," Supporting a Claim - Turning an Infographic Into a Speech.

VOCABULARY
Today's reading:  failure  resilient  grit  shortcomings

AGENDA & CLASS BUSINESS & WEEKLY NEWS
Personnelmen hand out graded work.  Students add own spelling and grammar issues on p. 43 for practice.
Review daily announcements.
Collect book projects.

INTRODUCTION
Students will write daily objective in planner & answer QOD:
Review your notes from yesterday - which item will you have the most trouble with?

PROCEDURES
First period of each block:
Get together with a partner (or remain alone) to review what will occur during one minute speech.
Deliver quick speeches to class.
Listeners will practice effective listening skills and provide feedback.

Second period of each block:
Students present speeches; listeners will pay attention and ask relevant questions.
SSR (Sustained Silent Reading on a grade level (or above) novel of student choice.
Respond to reading passage.

CLOSURE
What strengths do you need to develop in order to give a better speech next time?

HOMEWORK
none

ASSESSMENT
QOD responses; SSR responses, closure responses, dyad work and communication, speeches and listening skills.
 
DIFFERENTIATION
Students determine with whom to work on a speech.
Dyads decide how to organize a speech - no parameters given.
Students choose from enumerable grade level novels for SSR - student choice.

Related Standards/Objectives: SL.7.1d, W.7.7, W.7.9, SL.7.1b, SL.7.1, SL.7.3, SL.7.6, L.7.1, L.7.3



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