Los Angeles Unified School District Local District 4


Low college acceptance and attendance rates, skyrocketing teacher attrition, under qualified teachers, overcrowding, high student or staff absenteeism and lack of parental and community engagement bed



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Low college acceptance and attendance rates, skyrocketing teacher attrition, under qualified teachers, overcrowding, high student or staff absenteeism and lack of parental and community engagement bedevil positive efforts.

Belmont High School, grades 9-12, provides services for 5,447 students, including a Newcomer Center for recent arrivals to this country. It operates on a year-round schedule, Concept 6, and sends out by buses approximately 1050 students to cap- receiving high schools throughout the LAUSD. Of these students, 8.2% are special education students and 49% are English Learners. Students come from families receiving Cal WORKS services. According to the 2000 Census, Belmont’s residence area is in the highest category relative to percentage of immigrants, non-citizens, low-income families, second language households, and persons without a high school diploma. The enrollment data further indicate a population of approximately 270 homeless students.

The 2004 restructuring of the Los Angeles Unified School District led to the creation of eight local districts. LAUSD’s Local District 4 serves almost 100,000 students in more than 100 schools in the Pico-Union, Hollywood, and northeast section of Los Angeles.


Belmont High School Dropout and Graduation Rates

Based on UC ACCORD's analysis of California data conducted by Dr. Julie Mendoza, Co-Director of the California Opportunity Indicator's Project College Opportunity Ratio, Belmont High School ranked 52 out of the 58 LAUSD high schools with an estimated cohort graduation rate of only 35%. “The College Opportunity Ratio (COR) is a new


statistical indicator that re[ports the effectiveness of the state’s high schools in producing college ready graduates.”1 Table 3 encapsulates the findings.

Table 3: Belmont High School Enrollment and Graduation Rates 1998-2002




Students by Ethnic Group


1998

9th Grade

Enrollment


2002

12th Grade

Graduation


Number of Graduates Successfully Completing

A-G Requirements with Grade of C or Better



Latino/African-American

1,921

628

62

White/Asian

177

98

29

Total

2,098

726

91

The figures of the 2002 COR, graphed below, suggest that at Belmont High School, for every 100 students who enter the 9th grade, only 33 graduate four years later and of those who graduate only 4 complete the A-G requirements with a grade of C or better.


When disaggregated by race/ethnicity, for every 100 Latino and African-American 9th graders enrolled in Fall 1998, only 33 graduated in Spring 2002 and only 3 of these graduates complete the A-G requirements with a grade of C or better.
By contrast, for every 100 white and Asian-American students in the 9th grade, 55 graduated and of those, 16 complete the A-G requirements with a grade of C or better.
In addition, in another independent analysis using LAUSD student-level data, Dr. Mendoza tracked 59,000 9th graders enrolled in Fall 2000 over eight consecutive semesters and found that 72% of the total four-year Latino attrition rate occurred in the grade transition between the 9th and 10th grade. Among African-Americans the rate is even higher, 74% of their total four-year attrition occurs in the grade transition between 9th and 10th grade.

These data indicate gross disparities. While these rates are far below what all students deserve, the achievement rate for low and moderately income white and Asian-American students is 4 times greater than that of low and moderately income Latino and African-American students at Belmont High School. While the numbers may change to a small degree from year to year, the negative trends and patterns are unfortunately consistent in this and other large urban school districts across the state.2


Most students lack basic skills. SAT scores are approximately 200 points below the state average for a combined score. Less than one-third of students fulfill course requirements for admission into the California State Universities or the University of California.
Table 4. Student Achievement and School Performance




Belmont

State Average

API Ranking

1




Similar schools ranking

3




Summary

below average




CAT/6 - 2004







Math – 9th grade mean scale score

654.8

690.31

Reading – 9th grade mean scale score

636.7

664.7

Language – 9th grade mean scale score

642.6

666.5

% students taking test

90%

95%

Average SAT Scores




Math

409

516

Verbal

390

492

% of students meeting state college requirements

30%

35%

% enrolled in 1st-year chemistry or physics

22%

36%

% enrolled in advanced math

39%

25%

The 2004-05 CAHSEE results show the passage rate for students in the 10th and 11th grade at Belmont High School as follows:


Table 5: 2004-05 CAHSEE Results for Belmont High School

Students Tested



Number Tested

Number Passed

Percent Passed

Number Not Passed

Percent Not Passed

English Language Arts

All Students

1,960

851

43%

1,109

57%

10th Grade

1,158

606

52%

552

48%

11th Grade

802

245

31%

557

69%



















Mathematics

All Students

1,928

817

42%

1,111

58%

10th Grade

1,153

538

47%

615

53%

11th Grade

775

279

36%

496

64%


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