Ldc module Template Energy Sources



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LDC Module Template

Energy Sources



Information Sheet for Argumentation Module


Module title:

Energy Sources

Module description (overview):

This module is part of a unit in which students study energy production using fossil fuels and alternative sources. Students will read informative text and write an argumentative essay on their preferred source of energy.

Template task (include number, type, level):

Task 1 Template: After researching ___________(informational texts) on ____________ (content), write a/an ___________ (essay or substitute) that argues your position on ____________(content). Support your position with evidence from your research. D1: Be sure to acknowledge competing views. D2: Give examples for past or current events of issues to illustrate and clarify your position. (Argumentative/Analysis)

Teaching task:

After researching informative texts on energy sources, write an essay that argues your position on alternative versus fossil fuels as a source of energy. Support your position with evidence from your research. Be sure to acknowledge competing views. Give examples for past or current events of issues to illustrate and clarify your position. D1: Be sure to acknowledge competing views. D2: Give examples for past or current events of issues to illustrate and clarify your position. (Argumentative/Analysis)

Grade(s)/Level:

9th Grade

Discipline: (e.g., ELA, science, history, other?)

Science

Course:

Physical Science

Author(s):

Karen Jones

Contact information:

jonesk@greenbrierschools.org



Section 1: What Task?


Teaching Task

Teaching task:

After researching informative texts on energy sources, write an essay that argues your position on alternative versus fossil fuels as a source of energy. Support your position with evidence from your research. Be sure to acknowledge competing views. Give examples for past or current events of issues to illustrate and clarify your position. D1: Be sure to acknowledge competing views. D2: Give examples for past or current events of issues to illustrate and clarify your position. (Argumentative/Analysis)

Reading texts:

Concepts In Action: Physical Science

A Ball of Energy by Gabrielle Sierra from ReadWorks.org

Online Articles: http://energy.gov/eere/energybasics/energy-basics and http://www.pbs.org/newshour/extra/features/july-dec05/gascosts_11-21.html

Student chosen articles on alternative energy source and fossil fuels



Background to share with students:

Review CARS Checklist of Credibility and APA Citation

Extension (optional):

None


Content Standards From State or District

Standards source:

Arkansas Curriculum Frameworks

Physical Science



Number

Content StandardS

NS.11.PS.6

Research current events and topics in physical science.

NS.13.PS.3

Evaluate long-range plans concerning resource use and by-product disposal for environmental, economic, and political impact.

Common Core State Standards

NUMBER

ANCHOR STANDARDS FOR READING

1

Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.

2

Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.

4

Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.

10

Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.

NUMBER

ANCHOR STANDARDS FOR WRITING

1

Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

4

Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

5

Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

9

Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

10

Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audience.





















Argumentation Teaching Task Rubric for Template Task Collection Version 2.0


Scoring Elements

Not Yet

Approaches Expectations

Meets Expectations

Advanced

1

1.5

2

2.5

3

3.5

4

Focus

Attempts to address prompt, but lacks focus or is off-task.




Addresses prompt appropriately and establishes a position, but focus is uneven. D. Addresses additional demands superficially.




Addresses prompt appropriately and maintains a clear, steady focus. Provides a generally convincing position. D: Addresses additional demands sufficiently




Addresses all aspects of prompt appropriately with a consistently strong focus and convincing position. D: Addresses additional demands with thoroughness and makes a connection to claim.

Controlling Idea

Attempts to establish a claim, but lacks a clear purpose.




Establishes a claim.




Establishes a credible claim.




Establishes and maintains a substantive and credible claim or proposal.

Reading/ Research

Attempts to reference reading materials to develop response, but lacks connections or relevance to the purpose of the prompt.




Presents information from reading materials relevant to the purpose of the prompt with minor lapses in accuracy or completeness.




Accurately presents details from reading materials relevant to the purpose of the prompt to develop argument or claim.




Accurately and effectively presents important details from reading materials to develop argument or claim.

Development

Attempts to provide details in response to the prompt, but lacks sufficient development or relevance to the purpose of the prompt.




Presents appropriate details to support and develop the focus, controlling idea, or claim, with minor lapses in the reasoning, examples, or explanations.




Presents appropriate and sufficient details to support and develop the focus, controlling idea, or claim.




Presents thorough and detailed information to effectively support and develop the focus, controlling idea, or claim.

Organization

Attempts to organize ideas, but lacks control of structure.




Uses an appropriate organizational structure for development of reasoning and logic, with minor lapses in structure and/or coherence.




Maintains an appropriate organizational structure to address specific requirements of the prompt. Structure reveals the reasoning and logic of the argument.




Maintains an organizational structure that intentionally and effectively enhances the presentation of information as required by the specific prompt. Structure enhances development of the reasoning and logic of the argument.

Conventions

Attempts to demonstrate standard English conventions, but lacks cohesion and control of grammar, usage, and mechanics. Sources are used without citation.




Demonstrates an uneven command of standard English conventions and cohesion.

Uses language and tone with some inaccurate, inappropriate, or uneven features. Inconsistently cites sources.






Demonstrates a command of standard English conventions and cohesion, with few errors. Response includes language and tone appropriate to the audience, purpose, and specific requirements of the prompt. Cites sources using appropriate format with only minor errors.




Demonstrates and maintains a well-developed command of standard English conventions and cohesion, with few errors. Response includes language and tone consistently appropriate to the audience, purpose, and specific requirements of the prompt. Consistently cites sources using appropriate format.

Content Understanding

Attempts to include disciplinary content in argument, but understanding of content is weak; content is irrelevant, inappropriate, or inaccurate.




Briefly notes disciplinary content relevant to the prompt; shows basic or uneven understanding of content; minor errors in explanation.




Accurately presents disciplinary content relevant to the prompt with sufficient explanations that demonstrate understanding.




Integrates relevant and accurate disciplinary content with thorough explanations that demonstrate in-depth understanding.

Section 2: What Skills?




Skill

Definition

Skills Cluster 1: Preparing for the Task

1. Task engagement

Ability to connect the task and new content to existing knowledge, skills, experiences, interests, and concerns.

2. Task analysis

Ability to understand and explain the task’s prompt and rubric.

Skills Cluster 2: Reading Process

1. Text selection

Ability to identify appropriate texts.

2. Active reading

Ability to identify the central point and main supporting elements of a text. D1: Be sure to acknowledge competing views. D2: Give examples for past or current events of issues to illustrate and clarify your position.

3. Essential vocabulary

Ability to identify and master terms essential to understanding a text.

4. Academic integrity

Ability to use and credit sources appropriately.

5. Note-taking

Ability to select important facts and passages for use in one’s own writing.

Skills Cluster 3: Transition to Writing

1. Bridging

Ability to begin linking reading results to writing task.

Skills Cluster 4: Writing Process

1. Claim

Ability to establish a claim and consolidate information relevant to task.

2. Planning

Ability to develop a line of thought and text structure appropriate to an argumentation task.

3. Development

Ability to construct an initial draft with an emerging line of thought and structure. D1: Be sure to acknowledge competing views. D2: Give examples for past or current events of issues to illustrate and clarify your position.


4. Revision

Ability to refine text, including line of thought, language usage, and tone as appropriate to audience and purpose.

5. Editing

Ability to proofread and format a piece to make it more effective.

6. Completion

Ability to submit final piece that meets expectations.



Section 3: What Instruction?




Pacing

Skill and Definition

Product and Prompt

Scoring (Product “meets expectations” if it…)

Instructional Strategies

Skills Cluster 1: Preparing for the Task

Day 1

1. Task engagement

Ability to connect the task and new content to existing knowledge, skills, experiences, interests, and concerns.



Students will understand and recognize the seven forms of energy through the completion of several card-sorting activities that require them to record and discuss their reasoning and through analysis of other groups’ sorting decisions.


Students will demonstrate their understanding of the seven forms of energy by sorting the cards (types of energy) into the proper groups and completing energy definition cards along with illustrations and a fill-in-the-blank paragraph assessment.

Teacher will monitor small group as they brainstorm to sort cards into various groups and will orally question them on the reasoning used to group the cards.

Teacher will model how to fill in definition cards and will check the paragraph assessment for correctness.



Day 2

2. Task analysis/essential vocabulary

Ability to understand and explain the task’s prompt and rubric.



Students will work in small groups and read the teaching task They will look up the meanings of any unknown terms and rewrite the task in their own words. Each group will share their version of the task.

Students will work in small groups to read and analyze a sample argumentative essay called “Health and Healing At Your Fingertips”, and learn how to identify the parts called: claims, evidence, and rebuttals.




Meets expectations when students rewrite the teaching task in their science notebooks.

.

Meets expectations when the students used a graphic organizer called a QCEE (question, claim, evidence, and explanation) to dissect a sample argumentative essay.



Teacher will provide the students with a copy of the teaching tasks and reference materials to analyze the teaching task to gain a deeper understanding of expectations before research begins.

Teacher will model how to identify the parts of an argumentative essay by doing a different sample from the students called “Who Owns the Past” and show them how to correctly fill out the QCEE organizer for their assigned article.




Day 2/3

2. Active reading

Ability to identify the central point and main supporting elements of a text.


Students will close read Article One called “High Gas Prices Could Mean Cold Classrooms and Cancelled Trips” and Article Two called “Renewable Basics” by finding answers to essential questions.

Students will close read an article called “A Ball of Energy” by answering seven multiple choice and three open response questions attached to the reading packet.

After completing the active reading, students must make a choice of which alternative energy source they would like to research to write an argumentative essay on versus fossil fuels.


Meets expectations when student answers questions from the article in their science notebooks.

Meets expectation when all questions are answered correctly.

Meets expectation when students sign a list of their choice of alternative energy for research.


Teacher will provide students with articles to close read on alternative renewable energy sources by asking these questions:

Article One: 1. The shortage of which natural resource is the cause of the problem in this article. 2. Discuss several conservative efforts made by schools to reduce energy usage.

Article Two: Students will define renewable energy and make a list of the six types of alternative energy sources and discuss each one.

Teacher will monitor student progress on questions by walking around and orally questioning the small groups.



Teacher will provide a list to sign for research topic for argumentative essays.

Skills Cluster 2: Reading Process

Day 4

1. Text selection/Academic Integrity

Ability to identify appropriate texts.

Students will use the CARS checklist of credibility to search for 2 to 3 articles on both fossil fuels and an alternative energy source of their choice using computers. Students will do citation and bibliography graphic organizer for the chosen articles.

Meets expectation when students print out articles and defend their credibility orally from the checklist with their teacher for approval and complete the citation graphic organizer.

Teacher will briefly review the CARS checklist and MLA citation rules, and will approve the student chosen articles over fossil fuels and alternative energy sources and check the graphic organizer for correct bibliography format.

Day 5

5. Note-taking

Ability to select important facts and passages for use in one’s own writing.


Students will close read their chosen articles and takes notes on a QCEE (question, claim, evidence, and explanation) graphic organizer for both fossil fuels and the alternative energy source of choice to organize information for the essay.

Meets expectation when the students have completed one QCEE for fossil fuels and one for an alternative energy source.

Teacher will monitor QCEE forms for correctness by orally questioning each group. Teacher will also use questions to stimulate group discussion over which choice they are going to defend in their essays: fossils fuels or the alternative.

Skills Cluster 3: Transition to Writing

Day 5-6

1. Bridging

Ability to begin linking reading results to writing task.

Students will compare and contrast an alternative energy source with fossil fuels.

Meets expectation when students complete a poster project choosing either fossil fuels or an alternative energy source such as wind, hydroelectric, biomass, geothermal, solar, or nuclear. They must show both advantages and disadvantages of both kinds of energy with supporting evidence, they must include pictures of the source charts and graphs supporting their claim, maps of areas of the world where their energy source is being used, and the cost of installing and using their energy of choice.

Teacher will model using fossil fuels as an example to create the energy poster by following the assignment instructions. Teacher will suggest relevant websites and provide students with I-Pads to do research on.

Skills Cluster 4: Writing Process

Day 7

1. Claim

Ability to establish a claim and consolidate information relevant to task.

Students will establish a claim by using the completed QCEE graphic organizers and the poster project to organize information on index cards for: claim reason one with evidence, claim reason two with evidence, and a card for counter claim or rebuttal with evidence. Students also will need a card for the introduction and conclusion paragraphs.

Meets expectation when students have completed all 5 cards correctly using at least one citation on each card.

Teacher will read each card as the student completes it and offer praise and suggestions for improvement.

Day 8

2. Planning

Ability to develop a line of thought and text structure appropriate to an argumentation task.



Students will organize their information to write a proper argumentative essay.

Meets expectation when students complete an argumentative essay flowchart inserting their information into the graphic organizer.

Teacher explains all of the steps on the graphic organizer and monitors students as they complete the task.

Day 9

3. Development

Ability to construct an initial draft with an emerging line of thought and structure.



D1: Be sure to acknowledge competing views. D2: Give examples for past or current events of issues to illustrate and clarify your position.

Students will use graphic organizer flowchart to write the first draft of the argumentative essay which will include competing arguments and examples.

Meets expectation when first draft is complete.

Teacher will read first drafts and provide encouragement and positive feedback on which areas are strong and which ones need some improvement.

Day 10

4. Revision/Editing

Ability to refine text, including line of thought, language usage, and tone as appropriate to audience and purpose.

Ability to proofread and format a piece to make it more effective.


Students will revise and edit their drafts in teacher chosen small groups by reading their papers to their groups and making corrections together.

Meets expectations when first draft is corrected and ready to write.

Teacher will monitor groups to make sure that positive and encouraging peer editing is taking place, and that every group is on task.

Day 11

6. Completion

Ability to submit final piece that meets expectations.



Students will type the final draft of the argumentative essay of fossil fuels vs. alternative energy sources.

Meets expectation when the final draft is handed in.

Teacher will use the argumentative scoring rubric to assess all of the essays.


Materials, references, and supports


For Teachers

For Students

(Day One) Energy forms unit materials for card sort for Task Engagement

(Day One/Two) Copies of the Teaching Task for task analysis activity and reference materials

(Day Two/Three ) Articles for Active Reading: “High Gas Prices Could Mean Cold Classrooms and Cancelled Trips” @ http://www.pbs.org/newshour/extra/features/july-dec05/gascosts_11-21.html, “Renewable Basics” @greenlearning.ca, “A Ball of Energy” @ ReadWorks.org

(Day Four) CARS Checklist of Credibility for Text Selection and

citation graphic organizer for Academic Integrity

(Day 5) Question, Claim, Evidence, and Explanation Graphic Organizer

(Day Five and Six) Scoring Rubric for Poster Project for Bridging Activity

(Day 7) Question, Claim, Evidence, and Explanation Graphic Organizer

(Day 8) Argumentative Flowchart to organize the information for the essay

I-pads and computer for research and typing essays




Poster board

Markers


Glue

Science notebook

CARS Checklist of Credibility

Citation Graphic Organizer

1,2,3 Close Reading Graphic Organizer

QCEE graphic organizer

Argumentative Flowchart

Section 4: What Results?


Student work samples

[Include at least two samples of student work at each scoring level.]



Classroom Assessment Task (Optional: May be used as Pre-Test or Post-Test)

Classroom assessment task




Background to share with students (optional):




Reading texts:





Teacher Work Section


Here are added thoughts about teaching this module.

Appendix


The attached materials support teaching this module.



Argumentation Template from LDC Guide for Teachers | © Literacy Design Collaborative, August 2011


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