Kansas Summit on Obesity September 6, 2012 Summary of Panel and Breakout Group Recommendations



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Kansas Summit

on Obesity
September 6, 2012

Summary of Panel and

Breakout Group Recommendations



  • Agency Panel Recommendations

  • Institute of Medicine Goals, Recommendations, and Strategies

  • Summary of Breakout Group Recommendations

  • Breakout Group Detail


Summary of Agency Panel Recommendations
A multi-agency panel answered questions posed by Dr. Bill Dietz and discussed possible action steps within their sector, since obesity is a multi-faceted, multi-factorial issue.
Panel Members

  • Dr. Robert Moser, Kansas Department of Health and Environment

  • Caleb Asher, Kansas Department of Commerce

  • Robin Jennison, Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism

  • Mike King, Kansas Department of Transportation

  • Shawn Sullivan, Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services

  • Mark Thompson, Kansas State Department of Education

  • Terri Williams, Kansas Juvenile Justice Authority

Below are specific recommendations or action steps, including current activities underway that could be continued or expanded, offered by panel members during the course of their discussion.


Businesses and Workplace

  • Implement innovative programs and incentives promoting healthy lifestyles at work.

  • Instead of just focusing on a skilled workforce, focus on skilled and healthy workforce. Promote a healthy workforce.

  • When recruiting companies and marketing Kansas to businesses, promote a healthy workforce and ask companies what they will do to ensure a healthy workplace.


Natural and Built Environments

  • Continue and expand efforts underway to increase use of state parks.

  • Increase awareness of parks and outdoor lifestyle.

  • Utilize senior (65 and older) population to be outdoor mentors to the younger population.

  • Implement outdoor activity program focusing on young people just starting to go out on their own (getting driver’s license, going to college), promoting independent use and enjoyment of the outdoors.

  • Greater focus on women when promoting Kansas outdoor activities, including hunting.

  • Funding is provided to locals through Transportation Enhancement Program, which can be utilized for bicycle and pedestrian trails.

    • Consider higher scoring of bike or trail program when evaluating these grant applications; base scoring scale on health in addition to economic development

  • Safe Routes to School program

  • Better connect trail system, incorporating businesses and schools

  • Turn “rest stops” along our highways into “recreational stops”. Change signs from “Rest Area” to “Kansas Tourism Recreational Area”.


Communities

  • Turn senior centers into vibrant, intergenerational community centers, including exercise and other activities involving the whole community.

  • Promote outdoor and after-school programs involving both schools and seniors.


Schools

  • Before and after school programs emphasizing physical activity

  • Healthier US School Challenge

  • Fitnessgram

  • Let’s Move in Kansas Schools

  • Power Panther Pals

  • Extend current initiatives such as the above beyond school walls and incorporate families and community members.


Juvenile Justice

  • Affect behavioral change and promote physical activity for youth within JJA jurisdiction through providing opportunity and engaging young people in physical activities. These youth are disproportionately minority, have higher rates of mental health/depression issues, are more likely to be victims of abuse themselves, and are at a higher risk for obesity.

  • Better measure and asses health of youth under JJA jurisdiction

  • Many youth in custody are parents themselves. Incorporate child nutrition and fitness advice into their education.

  • Provide opportunities for physical activity during family visitations to youth in custody.



Cross-Sector

  • More communication and coordination on this issue at the cabinet level, then move down to the local level.

  • Be a convener and coordinator at the state level, creating more opportunities for local stakeholders.

  • Provide healthier options at state employee cafeterias .

  • Coordinate messaging from multiple fronts on increasing physical activity and better nutrition. Create a new norm, so it’s not a surprise when parents and kids walk into a school and they aren’t able to buy a candy bar.

  • Include Department of Agriculture in these discussions and efforts.

  • Promote intergenerational and mentoring opportunities.

  • Better assess and measure our progress in this area (KDOT examples: bicycle helmets, streetscapes, etc.)

  • Make more data available to communities, including continuing and expanding KansasHealthMatters.org website

Institute of Medicine’s Accelerating Progress in Obesity Prevention: Solving the Weight of the Nation

Goals, Recommendations, and Strategies
Goals, recommendations, and strategies within the Institute of Medicine report, Accelerating Progress in Obesity Prevention, provided a framework for the breakout group discussions.

Physical Activity Environments

Goal 1: Make physical activity an integral and routine part of life.

Recommendation 1: Communities, transportation of­ficials, community planners, health professionals, and governments should make promotion of physical activity a priority by substantially increasing access to places and opportunities for such activity.
Strategy 1-1: Enhance the physical and built environment.

Strategy 1-2: Provide and support community programs designed to increase physical activity.

Strategy 1-3: Adopt physical activity requirements for licenses child care providers.

Strategy 1-4: Provide support for the science and practice of physical activity.




Food and Beverage Environments

Goal 2: Create food and beverage environments that ensure that healthy food and beverage options are the routine, easy choice.
Recommendation 2: Governments and decision makers in the business community/private sector should make a concerted effort to reduce unhealthy food and beverage options and substantially increase healthier food and beverage options at affordable, competitive prices.
Strategy 2-1: Adopt policies and implement practices to reduce overconsumption of sugar-sweetened beverages.

Strategy 2-2: Increase the availability of lower-calorie and healthier food and beverage options for children in restaurants.

Strategy 2-3: Utilize strong nutritional standards for all foods and beverages sold or provided through the government, and ensure that these healthy options are available in all places frequented by the public.

Strategy 2-4: Introduce, modify, and utilize health-promoting food and beverage retailing and distribution policies.

Strategy 2-5: Broaden the examination and development of U.S. agriculture policy and research to include implica­tions for the American diet.
Message Environments

Goal 3: Transform messages about physical activity and nutrition.
Recommendation 3: Industry, educators, and governments should act quickly, aggressively, and in a sustained manner on many levels to transform the environment that surrounds Americans with messages about physical activity, food, and nutrition.
Strategy 3-1: Develop and support a sustained, targeted physical activity and nutrition social marketing program.

Strategy 3-2: Implement common standards for marketing foods and beverages to children and adolescents.

Strategy 3-3: Ensure consistent nutrition labeling for the front of packages, retail store shelves, and menus and menu boards that encourages healthier food choices.

Strategy 3-4: Adopt consistent nutrition education policies for federal programs with nutrition education components.



Health Care and Work Environments

Goal 4: Expand the role of health care providers, insurers, and employers in obesity prevention.

Recommendation 4: Health care and health service providers, employers, and insurers should increase the support structure for achieving better population health and obesity prevention.

Strategy 4-1: Provide standardized care and advocate for healthy community environments.

Strategy 4-2: Ensure coverage of, access to, and incentives for routine obesity prevention, screening, diagnosis, and treatment.

Strategy 4-3: Encourage active living and healthy eating at work.

Strategy 4-4: Encourage healthy weight gain during pregnancy and breastfeeding, and promote breastfeeding friendly environments.

School Environments

Goal 5: Make schools a national focal point for obesity prevention.
Recommendation 5: Federal, state, and local government and education authorities, with support from parents, teachers, and the business community and the private sector, should make schools a focal point for obesity prevention.
Strategy 5-1: Require quality physical education and opportunities for physical activity in schools.

Strategy 5-2: Ensure strong nutritional standards for all foods and beverages sold or provided through schools.

Strategy 5-3: Ensure food literacy, including skill development, in schools.

Summary of Breakout Group Recommendations
Breakout groups reported the following top-priority recommendations as a result of their discussions and deliberations.
Group 1a – Promising Strategies for Physical Activity Environments


  1. Continue and strengthen Complete Streets Policy and Safe Routes to School program

  2. Enhance and strengthen walk programs, such as Walk Kansas and Derby Walk

  3. Encourage child care providers to incorporate physical activity daily

Through state licensing and program incentives

  1. Make better use of community collaborations to help combine resources

Group 1b – Promising Strategies for Physical Activity Environments



  1. Working with university students to partner with programs

  2. Development and support of community centers

  3. Advancing policy, practice, and environmental changes that are evidence-based

  4. Promotion and planned distribution of worksite wellness toolkit, including examples of incentives

Group 2 – Promising Strategies for Food & Beverage Environments



  1. Promote water consumption

  2. Work with retailers to improve access to healthier food options

Including farmers’ markets

  1. Adopt land use policies that support community gardens and farmers’ markets

  2. Adopt tax policies that incentivize healthy foods

Group 3 – Communication & Message Environments



  1. Social Marketing: Make healthy choice the easy choice

    1. Campaign

    2. Built environment

    3. Need to narrow topic & audience

    4. Need evaluators

    5. Impact social norms change & knowledge/behavior change

    6. Involve: vendors, consumers, advocates, state/local government, media, funders, foundations

  2. Make Healthy Options Fun

    1. Audience: youth

    2. Tie healthy options to fun event

    3. May need different strategies by gender

    4. Involve: University/high school mascots, coaches, players

    5. School gardens – cook what you grow

    6. Walking school bus

    7. Statewide initiatives offer healthier foods (festivals)




  1. Educate on portion size

Including restaurants, educators, vendors, consumers, families

    1. Offer more portion sizes

    2. Impact: cutting calories, more variety, customer demand, individuals nutrition (eating to your needs)

    3. Promote “half meal in a box” concept

  1. Involve food suppliers, restaurants, and consumers

    1. Customer demand

    2. Involve: purchasers, Food Science Institute @ K-State

    3. Vendors “audition” foods – taste test

    4. Governor award for changes

4 – Promising Strategies for Health Care & Work Environments



  1. Encourage personal responsibility for preventing and reducing obesity

  2. Standardize fitness measures

You can’t change what you can’t measure

  1. Recognize mental health aspect in obesity prevention and treatment

  2. Encourage healthy eating and living at worksites

Includes access to affordable healthy foods for employees
5a – Promising Strategies for School Environments

  1. Physical Education

Establish minimum pre-K through 12 PE Standards

  1. Physical Activity

Emphasize Coordinated School Physical Activity Programs (CSPAP), addressed through Let’s Move in Kansas Schools

Special emphasis on activity in the classroom

  1. Nutrition Education and Skills Development

Expand fresh fruit and vegetables program to all Kansas schools

  1. Nutrition Standards

Ensure adequate time and space for students to eat school meals, closed campus during lunch hours

5b – Promising Strategies for School Environments



  1. Incorporate Physical Activity into classroom

Including Staff Development

  1. Physical Education and Physical Activity Policy Requirements

  2. School & Community Gardens

Increase food literacy, physical activity

  1. Health Report Card

Standard information shared, including fitness goals

Note: Gray text is additional detail submitted by a group, not included on reporting slides.

Breakout Group Detail
This section provides additional detail from the breakout group discussions, including current and suggested action steps, within the IOM goal and strategy framework.
Physical Activity Environments: Goal 1. Make physical activity an integral and routine part of life.
Strategy 1-1: Enhance the physical and built environment.

  • Enrolled land in walk & hunting

  • Enhance sidewalks around schools

  • Safe Routes to School

  • Pass complete streets policy resolution

  • Prairie Band’s walking/bike paths along transportation routes

  • Modified work schedules to allow for physical activity

  • Identify areas for community gardens; use abandoned areas for community gardens

  • Break down the silos between different sectors of the community

  • A program modeled after neighborhood watch that encourages in a safe environment


Strategy 1-2: Provide and support community programs designed to increase physical activity.

  • Walk Kansas

    • Continue

    • Do more often than 12 weeks

  • Safe Routes to School

  • Incorporate incentives and distance marks into Complete Streets, Safe Routes to School, and bike/ride trails

  • Provide programs for medication review having physical therapists work with patients on gait & balance

  • Healthy Congregations: a member leading the Faithfully Fit physical activity program one week with snacks provided. Program is accessible to people with different levels of physical ability/

  • Healthy church dinners with a physical activity

  • Make school tracks available for community use

  • KHF providing grants for planning of sustainable physical education charges

  • Wellness weavers: leader worked with neighbors to start a community garden. Families worked in the garden together

  • Lawrence Parks & Rec: Physical activity incorporated into nutrition lessons to youth through summer camps

  • OK Kids: 2 day program for families at John Redmond Reservoir

  • Market programs effectively

  • Community workout events

  • Free community center Family Fun Night

  • PSA’s used to encourage physical activity

  • Collaborate with AAA to provide seniors with opportunity to be active and involved in the community

  • Work with allied health students to partner with programs to develop future leaders


Strategy 1-3: Adopt physical activity requirements for licensed child care providers.

  • Work with providers to get them education on physical activity

  • Pre-schools community gardening

  • Toddler open gym with trained staff onsite

  • Licensed child care providers - captive audience for sharing information


Strategy 1-4: Provide support for the science and practice of physical activity.

  • PATH education program for seniors helps encourage continued physical activity because participants can see the evidence of benefit

  • Walk with Ease

  • Communitycommons.org

  • Bike for Discounts

  • K Fit data will show support for physical activity programs

  • Discuss the art, science and process of behavioral change

  • Using qualitative data to find what will encourage people to engage in physical activity

  • Design a motivational interviewing process to find how we can reach in to the community versus the community having to come to us

  • Develop physical activity opportunities for people using what is already in their community

  • Support and develop community centers for school/community use

  • Plan around implementing best practices

  • Develop a work site wellness toolkit and example incentives and ensuring its promotion


Other:

  • Increase access to locally grown and harvested foods. Grow more food for direct consumption.

  • Elevate discussion on integrating environmental and physical health.

  • Use competition aspect

  • Use small incentives, such as ribbons

  • Incorporate electronic measurement, paper tracking sheet, online tracking

  • Better collaborate and combine resources


Food and Beverage Environments: Goal 2. Create food and beverage environments that ensure that healthy food and beverage options are the routine, easy choice.
Strategy 2-1: Adopt policies and implement practices to reduce overconsumption of sugar-sweetened beverages.

  • Boys/Girls Club – Topeka policy

  • Just Add Water

  • KSU Extension consistent messaging in school and community

  • Clear on Calories, a Federal Initiative

  • School vending available during specific times of the day

  • School district healthy celebrations policy

  • Placement of beverages in vending machine

  • YMCA labeling (Red, Green, Yellow) of beverages in Wichita

  • Worksite healthy meetings policies

    • Sedgwick shares meeting/vendor guidelines

  • Work Well website

  • Changes in trans-fat and sodium content at the Federal level

  • Topeka zoo making sodium/deep fat frying changes, zoo provides water


Strategy 2-2: Increase the availability of lower-calorie and healthier food and beverage options for children in restaurants.

  • Substitute fruit instead of fries at restraurants

    • McDonald’s fruit and fries - change the default

  • Lower Trans-fat and lower sodium

  • Menu labeling

  • Child appropriate portions of adult food

  • No more kids’ menus

  • Provide smaller portions for adults

  • Parent-oriented messaging regarding healthy foods

  • “LYFE” fast food restaurant model

  • Recognition for healthy options that restaurants provide

  • Restaurant Association has Healthy Dining Guide

  • Convenience of healthier options

  • Price Exchanges

    • Health/non healthy – economic healthy options

  • Create demand for healthy options


Strategy 2-3: Utilize strong nutritional standards for all foods and beverages sold or provided through the government, and ensure that these healthy options are available in all places frequented by the public.

  • Schools

  • Quik Trips - fruits, water, and vegetables availability (Wichita)

  • WIC Standards

  • Food Commodities Program (Federal)

  • SNAP/EBT at state level

  • Department of Corrections Shawnee County policy to increase fruits and vegetables

  • Topeka zoo decreased fried foods and sodium

  • Cafeteria options at government buildings & universities

  • Community gardens

    • On-site sales

    • School yard gardens and childcare

    • Tastings/cooking demos

  • Summer food programs

  • Backpack programs


Strategy 2-4: Introduce, modify, and utilize health-promoting food and beverage retailing and distribution policies.

  • Address food deserts in Kansas grocery stores in rural areas

  • Include consumers in policymaking

  • Community gardens

    • Provide space

  • “Virtual grocery store” in Wyandotte County

  • Common Ground in Lawrence (community gardens)



Strategy 2-5: Broaden the examination and development of U.S. agriculture policy and research to include implica­tions for the American diet.

  • No taxes on fruits and vegetable



Message Environments: Goal 3. Transform messages about physical activity and nutrition.
Strategy 3-1: Develop and support a sustained, targeted physical activity and nutrition social marketing program.

  • Make healthy choice the easy choice (campaign)

  • Built environment & nutrition

    • More exercise & less eating

    • Need to narrow topic

    • Need to narrow audience

    • Need evaluators

    • Impact - social norms change & knowledge behavior change

  • Involve: vendor, community advocate, state & local government, foundations/founders, media

  • Healthy can be easy

  • Educate on portion size

    • Involved- restaurants, vendors, educators, families, customer demand

    • Impact- lower calories

    • More variety, individualized nutrition (eating to your needs)

    • Half in a box at restaurant

  • Social Marketing

  • Park Quest (Riley County)

    • Family focused

  • Elementary school marathon (Salina)

  • Outreach to scouts

  • Library reading program

    • Promote physical activity and nurtition

  • Church-State walking competition

  • Stop diabetes at work (ADA)

  • Just add water

  • Community garden & education

    • Targeted to youth

  • Breastfeeding welcome here

    • Comsumer targeted

  • Merck Co-op

    • Farmer’s market, farm tours, education foundation

  • Live Well Lawrence Campaign

  • Physical activity & nutrition, Pre/post & during pregnancy

    • Address cultural barriers

  • Sit for 60, Stand for 3

    • Promoted through Walk Kansas

  • Promote school lunch guidelines

  • Make healthy choice the default choice

  • Visual calorie needs campaign

    • Highlight Sodium


Strategy 3-2: Implement common standards for marketing food and beverages to children and adolescents.

  • Make healthy options “fun”

    • Children and adolescents

  • Tie healthy options to fun event

    • May need different strategies by gender

    • Involved- university or high school mascots/coaches/players

    • Sneak healthy food in fun food

    • School gardens- cook what you grow

    • Walking school buses

    • Festivals with healthy food options

  • New school lunch guidelines

    • Poster “My Plate” of each meal

  • Healthy school snacks

  • Teachers as healthy role models

  • Toy ban in restaurant meals

  • Vending posters

  • Stoplight labeling

  • Focus on positive messages

  • Educate on portion size

  • Healthy commercials

  • Promote “eating in”

  • Calories in food; snack vs. meal

  • Policy restricting ads


Strategy 3-3: Ensure consistent nutrition labeling for the front of packages, retail store shelves, and menus and menu boards that encourages healthier food choices.

  • Involve food suppliers, restaurants, and consumers

  • Consumer demand

  • Involved- purchasers, food science institution K-State

  • Vendors audition foods- taste test

  • Gov. award for changes

  • Changing concessions

  • NuVal System, but be wary of using one approach

  • Universal labeling system

  • Contact vendors and host sampling event

  • Involve food suppliers, restaurants, and consumers

  • Kid sized meals marketed to adults

  • Policy change

  • Vending labeling healthy options

  • NEMS-V labeling

  • Menus- small and large plate


Strategy 3-4: Adopt consistent nutrition education policies for federal programs with nutrition education components.

Federal focus, so no recommendations

Other:

  • School fundraising. Car wash, etc. instead of candy sales, cheesecake, etc.

  • Student run snacks - Healthy foods only

  • School parties/celebrations/sports - promote healthy snacks by parents

  • Encourage advertisers to create exceptional campaigns promoting healthy foods


Health Care and Work Environments: Goal 4. Expand the role of health care providers, insurers, and employers in obesity prevention.
Strategy 4-1: Provide standardized care and advocate for healthy community environments.

  • Healthcare and worksites coming together to discuss healthy living

  • Mental Health aspect of obesity treatment/prevention

  • Standardized fitness measurement, such as 1 mile walk test


Strategy 4-2: Ensure coverage of, access to, and incen­tives for routine obesity prevention, screening, diagnosis, and treatment.

  • Outcome based incentives – worksites

  • Health Department nurses provide coaching

  • On site screenings and health risk assessments (HRAs)

  • HRA follow up with physicians

  • Participation and outcomes based incentives

  • Reducing cost barriers in community fitness activities

  • Reducing medication co-pays

  • Wellness Coaching in worksites


Strategy 4-3: Encourage active living and healthy eating at work.

  • Life Simple 7 (AHA, CVH, HRA)

  • Multi-sector Community Health Coalitions

  • Community supported agriculture

  • Bringing healthy food to people

  • Healthy food in cafeterias and vending, including discounted healthy food

  • Healthy vending

  • Community activities (e.g., kids triathlon)

  • Recognizing employers and people who promote health

  • Free gym, fitness equipment

  • County commissioner established wellness priorities

  • Work Well Kansas

  • Using data to choose programs

  • Implement policies to promote health

  • Fitness counseling


Strategy 4-4: Encourage healthy weight gain during preg­nancy and breastfeeding, and promote breastfeeding-friendly environments.

  • Lactation rooms

  • High 5 for moms and babies - Hospital based interventions to increase breastfeeding (5 research-based recommendations)


Other:

  • Public policy for building and maintaining sidewalks

  • Social support for healthy living

  • Study successful practices

  • Measure outcomes/impact of interventions using cohort data

  • Changing language to change perception

  • Encourage personal responsibility

  • Talk to your community (e.g. hold focus groups)



School Environments: Goal 5. Make schools a national focal point for obesity prevention.
Strategy 5-1: Require quality physical education and op­portunities for physical activity in schools.

  • Physical education must be offered in elementary – no time or frequency defined

  • Assess students on physical activity (state level)

  • 1 credit for High School graduation requirement

  • Physical education teachers aligning core standards – life-long learners in sports/physical activity (Sports is NOT the only physical activity)

  • Minimum K-12 physical education requirements, minimum K-12 standards

  • Adequately fund physical education

  • Expand physical education beyond “sports”, focus on life-long activity

  • Let students understand physical activity is physical education

  • Take home kits to reinforce and practice what is learned in schools

  • Educate that exercise improves learning

  • Let’s Move in Kansas schools

  • K-Fit

  • I am moving I am learning- childcare

  • Team nutrition Resources

  • School gardens. Gardening is learning and activity

  • Start with moving at start of school day

  • Modify transportation in school day

  • Head start programs require daily physical activity

  • Family fitness & fun nights

  • Running clubs

  • Extracurricular clubs at secondary level that are physical activity focused (beyond sports)

  • Complete streets ordinances

  • Mapping of hiking & biking trails in relationship to schools

  • Let’s Move in Kansas Schools

  • Walking school bus

  • Walk/bike to school

  • Power Panther programs:

  • Intramurals

  • Schedule recess directly prior to lunch

  • Make recess a set number of minutes and don’t withhold

  • Emphasize CSPAP as addressed through LMIKS, especially activity in the classroom

  • Health Report Card, incorporate K-Fit and/or Fitnessgram report

  • Dual use agreements – to allow extended access to schools

  • Incorporate physical activity into class time

  • Develop safe routes to school plans, Walking School Buses

  • Fuel Up to Play - 60 interventions

  • Stability Balls

  • Staff development/fitness classes

  • Certification for physical education instructors policy

  • Physical education requirement

  • Use parks and playgrounds to full extent

  • Exercise Across America: Physical activity variety, tracked, incorporate families & community

  • Walk Kansas for Kids

  • Walk and Talk Club

  • Lunchtime or before school open gym

  • Girls on the Run

  • Professional Development for teachers on Brain Breaks

  • School Health Fairs


Strategy 5-2: Ensure strong nutritional standards for all foods and beverages sold or provided through schools.

  • Have teacher/parents eat with students, modeling behavior

  • HHFKA meal pattern requirements

    • More fruits and vegetables

    • More whole grains

    • No seconds for free

    • Kcal ranges

  • Nutrition Assessment with students

  • Getting kids to eat food

  • School gardening , overlap willingness to try new foods

  • Adequate time to eat

  • Marketing/promotion new changes

  • Farm to school

  • Obesity and hunger

  • Outreach to parents/community- newsletters on nutrition education

  • Introducing and educating student about new foods

  • Student advising councils

  • Fresh Fruit & Vegetable Program

  • Behavioral economics training- food samples

  • Issue of food being thrown away

  • Cafeteria: Appealing, adequate space and time

  • Production – forecasting training

  • Prepare food in appealing manner

  • Limit sodas sold during school day

  • Shape school environment by limiting soda visibility

  • Exemplary standards of model wellness policy guidelines (1 vote)

  • Apply Federal Nutrition guidelines to Day Care/Childcare

  • Food backpacks for food insecure families

  • Increase availability of water for meals

  • Foods as incentives – Limit, Shape, Eliminate

  • Food service healthy food catering for special events

  • Taste testing to introduce new foods (2 votes)

  • Kansas School Breakfast Challenge

  • Vending machines that accept free and reduced cards to purchase


Strategy 5-3: Ensure food literacy, including skill development, in schools.

  • Farm to School

  • Fresh Fruit & Vegetable Program expansion

  • School gardens

  • Link of school and community gardens

  • Samples – taste tests by student advisory councils

  • Incorporate nutrition into other subject areas

  • Nutrition recall

  • Involve site councils in taste testing

  • Teachers & parents model healthy nutrition behavior

  • Food prep skills and education of parents and students

  • School wellness councils – student & parent groups

  • Continuity of messages between Pre-K and school-age programs

  • Sharing of resources on physical activity and nutrition topics to all schools:

    • Resources depository

    • KSDE Child Nutrition and Wellness

    • Kansas Health Matters

    • Best practices

    • Program synergy

    • Success stories

  • School as Hub for outreach

  • Taste testing and fresh fruit and vegetables

  • Classroom curriculum - Use food in science and math curriculum

  • Home Economics

    • Food skills

    • Re-emphasize

    • Farm to School provide education

  • Training enhancements for kitchen staff (whole food uses)

  • Comprehensive food preparation and food literacy

  • Parent education on “healthy treat” ideas

  • One day/month for celebrations

  • Power Panther Pals

  • Removal of flavored milk (lower calorie intake but may also result in lower milk intake)




Other:

  • Strengthen school wellness councils (strengthen)

  • Define & promote link between healthy kids and learning/education

  • Education completion has influence on health


Obesity Summit Recommendations


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