Introduction to Behavioral Sciences Theme



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Introduction to Behavioral Sciences

Theme Behavioral Science is an introductory survey class that covers the disciplines of psychology and sociology. The course examines human behavior. The psychology component explores individual behavior and the factors that influence that behavior. These influences include both biological and psychological forces. Sociology examines the behavior of groups and how that is influenced by, and influences, individual human behavior. Combined these two subject areas help students better understand themselves and their place in the world as a whole.

Strand Behavioral Sciences

Topic Introduction to Psychology


Pacing

1-2 weeks



Content Statement

1. Psychology explores the current main psychological perspectives and the people associated with them.

Learning Targets:

 I can define the basic meaning of psychology.

 I can identify the origins of psychology, both philosophically and scientifically.

 I can name and describe the early schools of thought in the field of psychology.

 I can articulate the differences in the six contemporary perspectives in psychology.

 I can name and describe the major areas of specialization within the field of psychology.

 I can explain the scientific method and its four general steps.

 I can identify the major research methods used in psychology, including their advantages and disadvantages.

 I can explain the role of ethics in psychological research, and explain the major ethical guidelines for treatment of research participants.



Content Elaborations

Psychology is the study of human behavior and of the mental processes. This unit introduces the topic by first looking at the history of the discipline. It explores the current main psychological perspectives and the people associated with them. After introducing theory, the current areas of psychological research and study are discussed.





Content Vocabulary

 psychology  double-blind study

 positive psychology  informed consent

 basic research  psychoanalysis

 variable  case study

 gestalt  survey method

 placebo  empirical research


Academic Vocabulary

 analyze  develop

 applied  examine

 cause and effect  explain

 classify  interpret

 compare  predict

 contrast  present

 correlation  recognize

 create  write

 describe




Formative Assessments

 Pre-tests (graded but not recorded)

 Entrance slip: written response to prompt based on learning target to be covered in previous lesson (to ensure comprehension before moving on) or the upcoming lesson (to assess prior knowledge)

 “Thumbs up, thumbs down” by students to indicate their sense of understanding

 Pose questions to individual students ongoing during course of lesson

 Whole class discussion of lesson with maximum participation; monitor for student understanding

 Seek quick individual student responses on white boards

 Seek quick choral responses from the whole group of students

 “Think, Pair, Share”: students work in small groups to complete a prompt then report findings to class

 Exit slip: short “bell-ringer” written quizzes (may include multiple choice, short answer, etc.) at the end of the period

 Exit slip: responses to prompts at the end of the period

 Written homework tasks based upon learning targets, with option to make corrections based on feedback

 Quiz (graded but not recorded)

SLO pre-assessment




Summative Assessments

 Traditional unit tests, semester exams, end-of-course exam (multiple choice, true/false with corrections, matching, short answer, extended response; all tests should include many types of items)

 Observation and participation in community service hours

 Research paper based on service work

 Personal reflective journals

 Analytical essays

 Document-based essays

 Research-based essays (group or individual)

 Oral presentations (group or individual)

 Class debates

 Class Socratic discussions

 SLO post-assessment




Resources

 Text: Essentials of Psychology

 Programming from television

 Supplemental reading/resources

 Internet e-sources including primary sources, professional sources, government source, YouTube, TeacherTube, etc.

Video resources

 Guest speakers


Enrichment Strategies

 Spiral questioning: questioning on same topic with increasing levels of complexity based upon quality of student responses and interest.

 Connect current and past lesson content to current events in the news.

 Students may be invited to read difficult and significant original sources to learn content more in-depth.

 Student and teacher collaborate to create additional projects (historical newspaper, diorama).

 Students research and then teach a key part of the lesson.

 Students may shadow or interview a professional in the field of psychology.


Integrations

 Math/Science/Technology: Possible integration with policy-related statistics or scientific/technological processes

 Global Culture Studies

 Literature courses

 Native American Studies

 American Political Thought and Radicalism




Intervention Strategies

 Strategies for meeting the needs of all learners including gifted students, English Language Learners (ELL), and students with disabilities can be found on the ODE website: www.education.ohio.gov

 Resources based on the Universal Design for Learning principles are available at www.cast.org

 Preferential seating

 Make notes available online using Infinite Campus or other web-based system

 One-on-one instruction during common prep time and/or with academic assistant

 Review sessions before tests and quizzes, and especially before exams

 Extended deadlines

 Modified assignments and tests

 IAT referral





Introduction to Behavioral Sciences

Theme Behavioral Science is an introductory survey class that covers the disciplines of psychology and sociology. The course examines human behavior. The psychology component explores individual behavior and the factors that influence that behavior. These influences include both biological and psychological forces. Sociology examines the behavior of groups and how that is influenced by, and influences, individual human behavior. Combined these two subject areas help students better understand themselves and their place in the world as a whole.

Strand_Behavioral_Sciences__Topic_Bio-Psychology___Pacing'>Strand Behavioral Sciences

Topic Bio-Psychology


Pacing

2-3 weeks



Content Statement

2. In this unit, the students will explore the biological underpinnings of behavior.

Learning Targets:

 I can describe five interesting facts about the brain: size, need for oxygen, how it communicates, neural cell capacity, and resiliency.

 I can identify the functions of the four lobes of the brain: occipital, parietal, frontal, and temporal.

 I can distinguish the difference between the two speaking areas of the brain: Broca’s Area and Wernicke’s Area.

 I can identify personality characteristics/functions that originate from specific hemispheres/lobes of the brain.

 I can identify the signs of a stroke and can describe the possible afflictions that are caused by a stroke.

 I can label the various parts of a neural cell.

 I can describe how one neural cell communicates to another.

 I can describe the functions of six neurotransmitters: acetylcholine, dopamine, serotonin, endorphins, norepinephrine, and GABA.


Content Elaborations

In this unit, the students will explore the biological underpinnings of behavior. The ability to sense and make sense of the world, to coordinate movements, and to think, learn, remember, and solve problems is dependent on the functioning biological systems of the human brain and body. The students will explore the workings of the central nervous system, the brain, and the glandular system. The students will investigate the normal functioning of the biological systems in reference to behavior and compare it to the abnormal or damaged systems.




Content Vocabulary

 corpus callosum  Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS)

 parietal lobe  soma

 frontal lobe  dendrite

 motor strip  dendrite receptors

 temporal lobe  axon

 somatosensory cortex  vesicles

 occipital lobe  terminal buttons

 frontal association area  synapse

 dura  neurotransmitters

 alexia  reuptake transporter

 dyslexia  acetylcholine (Ach)

 achromatopsia  dopamine (DA)

 medulla  serotonin

 pons  endorphins

 cerebellum  norepinephrine

 reticular formation  GABA (gamma-amino-butyric acid)

 thalamus  Endocrine System

 basil ganglia  Pituitary Gland

 hypothalamus  Thyroid Gland

 amygdala  Adrenal Gland

 hippocampus  Sex Glands (ovary/testes)

 action potential


Academic Vocabulary

 analyze  develop

 applied  examine

 cause and effect  explain

 classify  interpret

 compare  predict

 contrast  present

 correlation  recognize

 create  write

 describe




Formative Assessments

 Pre-tests (graded but not recorded)

 Entrance slip: written response to prompt based on learning target to be covered in previous lesson (to ensure comprehension before moving on) or the upcoming lesson (to assess prior knowledge)

 “Thumbs up, thumbs down” by students to indicate their sense of understanding

 Pose questions to individual students ongoing during course of lesson

 Whole class discussion of lesson with maximum participation; monitor for student understanding

 Seek quick individual student responses on white boards

 Seek quick choral responses from the whole group of students

 “Think, Pair, Share”: students work in small groups to complete a prompt then report findings to class

 Exit slip: short “bell-ringer” written quizzes (may include multiple choice, short answer, etc.) at the end of the period

 Exit slip: responses to prompts at the end of the period

 Written homework tasks based upon learning targets, with option to make corrections based on feedback

 Quiz (graded but not recorded)

 SLO pre-assessment



Summative Assessments

 Traditional unit tests, semester exams, end-of-course exam (multiple choice, true/false with corrections, matching, short answer, extended response; all tests should include many types of items)

 Observation and participation in community service hours

 Research paper based on service work

 Personal reflective journals

 Analytical essays

 Document-based essays

 Research-based essays (group or individual)

 Oral presentations (group or individual)

 Class debates

 Class Socratic discussions

 SLO post-assessment




Resources

 Text: Essentials of Psychology

 Programming from television

 Supplemental reading/resources

 Internet e-sources including primary sources, professional sources, government source, YouTube, TeacherTube, etc.

 Video resources

 Guest speakers


Enrichment Strategies

 Spiral questioning: questioning on same topic with increasing levels of complexity based upon quality of student responses and interest.

 Connect current and past lesson content to current events in the news.

 Students may be invited to read difficult and significant original sources to learn content more in-depth.

 Student and teacher collaborate to create additional projects (historical newspaper, diorama).

 Students research and then teach a key part of the lesson.

 Students may shadow or interview a professional in the field of psychology.


Integrations

 Biological Sciences

 Chemistry

 Health


Literature

 Math/Science/Technology: Possible integration with policy-related statistics or scientific/technological processes




Intervention Strategies

 Strategies for meeting the needs of all learners including gifted students, English Language Learners (ELL), and students with disabilities can be found on the ODE website: www.education.ohio.gov

 Resources based on the Universal Design for Learning principles are available at www.cast.org

 Preferential seating

 Make notes available online using Infinite Campus or other web-based system

 One-on-one instruction during common prep time and/or with academic assistant

 Review sessions before tests and quizzes, and especially before exams

 Extended deadlines

 Modified assignments and tests

 IAT referral






Introduction to Behavioral Sciences

Theme Behavioral Science is an introductory survey class that covers the disciplines of psychology and sociology. The course examines human behavior. The psychology component explores individual behavior and the factors that influence that behavior. These influences include both biological and psychological forces. Sociology examines the behavior of groups and how that is influenced by, and influences, individual human behavior. Combined these two subject areas help students better understand themselves and their place in the world as a whole.

Strand Behavioral Sciences

Topic Abnormal Psychology


Pacing

2-3 weeks



Content Statement

3. When applying multiple criteria in behavior, abnormal psychology can determine when behavior crosses the line between normal and abnormal.

Learning Targets:

 I can identify the prevalence of psychological disorders in the general population.

 I can identify the misconceptions associated with mental disorders.

 I can define the term “abnormal” and explain the criteria used by psychologists as a working definition to determine who is exhibiting behaviors that would need psychological treatment.

 I can explain the physical causes (nature) and the environmental causes (nurture) leading to mental illness.

 I can identify the causes and symptoms of anxiety disorders.

 I can identify the causes and symptoms for dissociative disorders.

 I can identify the causes and symptoms of somatoform disorders.

 I can identify the causes and symptoms of mood disorders.

 I can describe who is at risk for suicide and causal factors leading to suicide.

 I can identify the symptoms of psychotic disorders.

 I can identify the causes and symptoms of schizophrenia.

 I can identify the statistical data connected to and the causes leading to schizophrenia.

 I can identify the causes and symptoms of the major types of personality disorders.




Content Elaborations

The students will apply multiple criteria in determining when behavior crosses the line between normal and abnormal. Mental or psychological disorders are patterns of abnormal behavior associated with significant personal distress or impaired functioning. The students will review several examples of psychological disorders, including anxiety disorders, dissociative and somatoform disorders, mood disorders, schizophrenia, and personality disorders. The unit ends with a discussion of suicide and steps that can be taken to help someone who may be contemplating suicide.




Content Vocabulary

 lobotomy  clinical or major depression

 Thorazine  bipolar disorder

 panic disorder or general  mania

anxiety disorder  serotonin

 deinstitutionalization  psychotic disorders

 panic disorders  hallucinations

 phobias (specific & social)  delusions

 agoraphobia  schizophrenia

 obsessive compulsive (OCD)  word salads

 post-traumatic stress (PTSD)  clang associations

 dissociative disorders  paranoid schizophrenia

 dissociative amnesia  hebephrenic schizophrenia

 general amnesia  catatonic schizophrenia

 dissociative identity disorder  narcissism

 mood disorders  borderline personality disorder

 dysthymic disorder  antisocial personality disorder


Academic Vocabulary

 analyze  develop

 applied  examine

 cause and effect  explain

 classify  interpret

 compare  predict

 contrast  present

 correlation  recognize

 create  write

 describe




Formative Assessments

 Pre-tests (graded but not recorded)

 Entrance slip: written response to prompt based on learning target to be covered in previous lesson (to ensure comprehension before moving on) or the upcoming lesson (to assess prior knowledge)

 “Thumbs up, thumbs down” by students to indicate their sense of understanding

 Pose questions to individual students ongoing during course of lesson

 Whole class discussion of lesson with maximum participation; monitor for student understanding

 Seek quick individual student responses on white boards

 Seek quick choral responses from the whole group of students

 “Think, Pair, Share”: students work in small groups to complete a prompt then report findings to class

 Exit slip: short “bell-ringer” written quizzes (may include multiple choice, short answer, etc.) at the end of the period

 Exit slip: responses to prompts at the end of the period

 Written homework tasks based upon learning targets, with option to make corrections based on feedback

 Quiz (graded but not recorded)

 SLO pre-assessment




Summative Assessments

 Traditional unit tests, semester exams, end-of-course exam (multiple choice, true/false with corrections, matching, short answer, extended response; all tests should include many types of items)

 Observation and participation in community service hours

 Research paper based on service work

 Personal reflective journals

 Analytical essays

 Document-based essays

 Research-based essays (group or individual)

 Oral presentations (group or individual)

 Class debates

 Class Socratic discussions

 SLO post-assessment




Resources

 Text: Essentials of Psychology

 Programming from television

 Supplemental reading/resources

 Internet e-sources including primary sources, professional sources, government source, YouTube, TeacherTube, etc.

 Video resources

 Guest speakers


Enrichment Strategies

 Spiral questioning: questioning on same topic with increasing levels of complexity based upon quality of student responses and interest.

 Connect current and past lesson content to current events in the news.

 Students may be invited to read difficult and significant original sources to learn content more in-depth.

 Student and teacher collaborate to create additional projects (historical newspaper, diorama).

 Students research and then teach a key part of the lesson.

 Students may shadow or interview a professional in the field of psychology.


Integrations

 Art


 Biological Sciences

 Chemistry

 Global Cultures

 Government

 Health

 History

 Literature

 Math/Science/Technology: Possible integration with policy-related statistics or scientific/technological processes




Intervention Strategies

 Strategies for meeting the needs of all learners including gifted students, English Language Learners (ELL), and students with disabilities can be found on the ODE website: www.education.ohio.gov

 Resources based on the Universal Design for Learning principles are available at www.cast.org

 Preferential seating

 Make notes available online using Infinite Campus or other web-based system

 One-on-one instruction during common prep time and/or with academic assistant

 Review sessions before tests and quizzes, and especially before exams

 Extended deadlines

 Modified assignments and tests

 IAT referral





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