incorporating the Year Eleven and Twelve programs) Principal


Unit 1: How can the diversity of materials be explained?



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Unit 1: How can the diversity of materials be explained?



Area of Study 1

How can knowledge of elements explain the properties of matter?

In this area of study students focus on the nature of chemical elements, their atomic structure and their place in the periodic table. They review how the model of the atom has changed over time. Students examine the periodic table as a unifying framework into which elements are placed based upon similarities in their electronic configurations.


Students explore patterns and trends of elements with reference to properties of the elements including their chemical reactivity.

Students investigate the nature of metals and their properties, including metallic nanomaterials. They investigate how a metal is extracted from its ore and how the properties of metals may be modified for a particular use. Students examine ionic compounds. Fundamental quantitative aspects of chemistry are introduced including the mole concept, relative atomic mass, percentage abundance and composition by mass and the empirical formula of an ionic compound.


Outcome 1

On completion of this unit the student should be able to relate the position of elements in the periodic table to their properties, investigate the structures and properties of metals and ionic compounds, and calculate mole quantities.


Area of Study 2

How can the versatility of non-metals be explained?

In this area of study students explore a wide range of substances and materials made from non-metals including molecular substances, covalent lattices, carbon nanomaterials, organic compounds and polymers. They compare how the structures of these non-metallic substances are represented and analyse the limitations of these representations.


Students study a variety of organic compounds and how they are grouped into distinct chemical families. Students investigate useful materials that are made from non-metals, and relate their properties and uses to their structures. They explore the modification of polymers and the use of carbon-based nanoparticles for specific applications.
Students apply quantitative concepts to molecular compounds, including mole concept and percentage composition by mass, and determine the empirical and molecular formulas of given compounds.


Outcome 2

On completion of this unit the student should be able to investigate and explain the properties of carbon lattices and molecular substances with reference to their structures and bonding, use systematic nomenclature to name organic compounds, and explain how polymers can be designed for a purpose.


Area of Study 3

Research investigation

Knowledge of the origin, structure and properties of matter has built up over time through scientific and technological research, including medical research, space research and research into alternative energy resources. This research and development is ongoing and new discoveries are being made at an accelerating rate. In this area of study students investigate one aspect of the discoveries and research that have underpinned the development, use and modification of useful materials or chemicals.


Outcome 3

On completion of this unit the student should be able to investigate a question related to the development, use and/or modification of a selected material or chemical and communicate a substantiated response to the question.


Assessment tasks

For outcomes one and two may be;

• annotations of a practical work folio of activities or investigations

• a report of a practical activity or investigation

• a modelling activity

• media response

• problem solving involving chemical concepts, skills and/or issues

• a reflective learning journal/blog related to selected activities or in response to an issue

• data analysis

• a test comprising multiple choice and/or short answer and/or extended response.
For outcome three:

A report of an independent investigation of a topic selected from Area of Study 1 or 2, using an appropriate format, for example digital presentation, oral communication or written report.



Unit 2: What makes water such a unique chemical?

Area of Study 1



How do substances interact with water?

In this area of study students focus on the properties of water and the reactions that take place in water including acid-base and redox reactions. Students relate the properties of water to the water molecule’s structure, polarity and bonding. They also explore the significance of water’s high specific heat capacity and latent heat of vaporization for living systems and water supplies.


Students investigate issues associated with the solubility of substances in water. Precipitation, acid-base and redox reactions that occur in water are explored and represented by the writing of balanced equations. Students compare acids with bases and learn to distinguish between acid strength and acid concentration. The pH scale
is examined and students calculate the expected pH of strong acids and strong bases of known concentration.

Outcome 1

On completion of this unit the student should be able to relate the properties of water to its structure and bonding, and explain the importance of the properties and reactions of water in selected contexts.


Area of Study 2

How are substances in water measured and analysed?

In this area of study students focus on the use of analytical techniques to measure the solubility and concentrations of solutes in water, and to analyse water samples for various solutes including chemical contaminants. Students examine the origin and chemical nature of substances that may be present in a water supply, including contaminants, and outline sampling techniques used to assess water quality. The concept of molarity is introduced and students measure concentrations of solutions using a variety of commonly used units. Students apply the principles of stoichiometry to analyses solutions and water samples. Instrumental techniques are introduced.


Outcome 2

On completion of this unit the student should be able to measure amounts of dissolved substances in water and analyse water samples for salts, organic compounds and acids and bases.


Area of Study 3

Practical investigation

Substances that are dissolved in water supplies may be beneficial or harmful, and sometimes toxic, to humans and other living organisms. They may also form coatings on, or corrode, water pipes. In this area of study students design and conduct a practical investigation into an aspect of water quality.


Outcome 3

On completion of this unit the student should be able to design and undertake a quantitative laboratory investigation related to water quality, and draw conclusions based on evidence from collected data.


Assessment task

A report of a student-designed quantitative laboratory investigation using an appropriate format, for example digital presentation, oral communication, scientific poster or written report.


Unit 3: How can chemical processes be designed to optimise efficiency?

The global demand for energy and materials is increasing with world population growth. In this unit students explore energy options and the chemical production of materials with reference to efficiencies, renewability and the minimisation of their impact on the environment.

Area of Study 1


What are the options for energy production?
On completion of this unit the student should be able to compare fuels quantitatively with reference to combustion products and energy outputs, apply knowledge of the electrochemical series to design, construct and test galvanic cells, and evaluate energy resources based on energy efficiency, renewability and environmental impact.
Area of Study 2
How can the yield of a chemical product be optimised?
On completion of this unit the student should be able to apply rate and equilibrium principles to predict how the rate and extent of reactions can be optimised, and explain how electrolysis is involved in the production of chemicals and in the recharging of batteries.

Unit 4: How are organic compounds categorised, analysed and used?

The carbon atom has unique characteristics that explain the diversity and number of organic compounds that not
only constitute living tissues but are also found in the fuels, foods, medicines and many of the materials we use in everyday life. In this unit students investigate the structural features, bonding, typical reactions and uses of the major families of organic compounds including those found in food.

Area of Study 1


How can the diversity of carbon compounds be explained and categorised?
On completion of this unit the student should be able to compare the general structures and reactions of the major organic families of compounds, deduce structures of organic compounds using instrumental analysis data, and design reaction pathways for the synthesis of organic molecules.
Area of Study 2
What is the chemistry of food?
On completion of this unit the student should be able to distinguish between the chemical structures of key food molecules, analyse the chemical reactions involved in the metabolism of the major components of food including the role of enzymes, and calculate the energy content of food using calorimetry.
Area of Study 3
Practical investigation

On the completion of this unit the student should be able to design and undertake a practical investigation related to energy and/or food, and present methodologies, findings and conclusions in a scientific poster.



PRODUCT DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY – Wood/Metal/Fibre

SCOPE OF STUDY

In VCE Product Design and Technology students assume the role of a designer-maker. In adopting this role, they acquire and apply knowledge of factors that influence design. Students address the design factors relevant to their design situation.
The knowledge and use of resources is integral to product design. These resources include a range of materials, and the tools, equipment and machines needed to transform these materials in a safe manner into useful products. Increasingly, the importance of environmental sustainability is having an impact on product design and development. More sustainable approaches are therefore at the forefront throughout the product lifecycle.
RATIONALE

Designers play an important part in our daily lives. They determine the form and function of the products we use. They transform ideas into drawings and plans for the creation and manufacture of useful products that fulfil human needs and wants.


VCE Product Design and Technology can provide a pathway to a range of related fields such as industrial, product, interior and exhibition design, engineering, and fashion, furniture, jewelry, textile and ceramic design at both professional and vocational levels.
ENTRY

There are no prerequisites for entry to Units 1, 2 and 3. Students must undertake Unit 3 prior to undertaking Unit 4.


Assessment task examples

  • Design folios (including the use of information and communications technology as appropriate) that contain design briefs, research, design ideas and options, documentation of decisions, materials lists and production plans;

  • Production work and records of production and modification;

  • Multimedia presentations supported by speaker’s notes;

  • Short written reports (materials testing activities, industry visits, technical reports, product evaluation reports, process evaluation reports);

  • Oral reports supported by notes and/or visual materials.


UNIT 1: Product re-design and sustainability

This unit focuses on the analysis, modification and improvement of a product design with consideration of the materials used and issues of sustainability.


Area of Study 1 provides an introduction and structured approach towards the Product design process and Product design factors.
In Area of Study 2, students produce a re-designed product safely using tools, equipment, machines and materials, compare it with the original design and evaluate it against the needs and requirements outlined in their design brief.

UNIT 2: Collaborative Design


In this unit students work in teams to design and develop an item in a product range or contribute to the design, planning and production of a group product. They focus on factors including: human needs and wants; function, purpose and context for product design; aesthetics; materials and sustainability; and the impact of these factors on a design solution.
In Area of Study 1, students work both individually and as members of a small design team to address a problem, need or opportunity and consider the associated human-centred design factors. They design a product within a range, based on a theme, or a component of a group product. They research and refer to a chosen style or movement.
In Area of Study 2 the product produced individually or collectively is evaluated.

UNIT 3: Applying the product design process


In this unit students are engaged in the design and development of a product that meets the needs and expectations of a client and/or an end-user, developed through a design process and influenced by a range of complex factors.
In Area of Study 1, students examine how a design brief is structured, how it addresses particular Product design factors and how evaluation criteria are developed from the constraints and considerations in the brief.
In Area of Study 2, students examine how a range of factors, including new and emerging technologies, and international and Australian standards.
In Area of Study 3, students commence the application of the Product design process for a product design for a client and/or an end-user, including writing their own design brief which will be completed and evaluated in Unit 4.

UNIT 4: Product Development and Evaluation


In this unit students learn that evaluations are made at various points of product design, development and production. In the role of designer, students judge the suitability and viability of design ideas and options referring to the design brief and evaluation criteria in collaboration with a client and/or end-user.
In Area of Study 1, students use comparative analysis and evaluation methods to make judgments about commercial product design and development.
In Area of Study 2, students continue to develop and safely manufacture the product designed in Unit 3.
In Area of Study 3, students evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of techniques they used and the quality of their product with reference to evaluation criteria and client and/or end-user feedback.


ENGLISH

RATIONALE

This study aims to enable all students to develop their critical understanding and control of the English language so that they can use it in a wide range of situations, ranging from the personal and informal to more public occasions, and to develop a level of competence adequate for the demands of post-school employment, further education, and participation in a democratic society.
AIMS

This study is designed to enable students to:


 extend their competence in using standard Australian English in meeting the demands of further study, the workplace, and their own needs and interests

 extend their language skills through thinking, reading, writing, speaking and listening

 communicate ideas, feelings, observations and information effectively, both orally and in writing, to a range of audiences

 present and justify their own points of view coherently and thoughtfully, both orally and in writing

 evaluate critically points of view expressed by others.

UNIT 1: English

Areas of study



  1. Reading and Creating Texts

  2. Analysing and Presenting Arguments

Outcomes


On completion of this unit the student should be able to:

  1. produce an analytical interpretation of the construction and features of a text.

  2. produce a creative response to a selected text.

  3. analyse how argument and persuasive language can be used to position an audience.

  4. create a text to position audiences

Assessment Tasks

Assessment tasks for this unit include:


  • an analytical response to a set text

  • a creative response to a set text

  • an analysis of the use of argument and persuasive language in texts

  • persuasive text intended to position audiences
UNIT 2: English

Areas of study



  1. Reading and Comparing Texts

  2. Analysing and Presenting Argument

Outcomes


On completion of this unit the student should be able to:

  1. compare the presentation of ideas, issues and themes in two texts.

  2. identify and analyse how argument and persuasive language are used in texts that attempt to influence an audience

  3. create a text which presents a point of view.

Assessment Tasks

Assessment tasks for this unit include:


  • a comparative analytical response to set texts

  • an analysis of the use of argument and persuasive language in texts

  • a persuasive text that presents an argument or viewpoint

Examination; Unit 2


UNIT 3: English

Areas of study



  1. Reading and Responding

  2. Creating and Presenting through Contexts

  3. Using language to persuade

Outcomes


On completion of this unit the student should be able to:

  1. Develop and justify a detailed interpretation of selected texts.

  2. Analyse orally and in writing how a selected text constructs meaning, conveys ideas and values and is open to interpretation.

  3. From a chosen Context, draw on a chosen text to create written texts for an audience with a purpose and to discuss their decisions about form, purpose, language, audience and context.

Assessment Tasks



School Assessed Coursework

Contributes 25 % to the final assessment


Assessment includes:

  1. An analytical/expository response to a selected text and exploration of how it constructs meaning.

  2. Written texts created for a specific audience and Context, with a written explanation of decisions about form, purpose, language, audience and context.

  3. Writing which analyses the use of language in three or more persuasive texts that debate a current issue in the Australian media, and a sustained and reasoned point of view on the selected issue in written or oral form.



UNIT 4: English

Areas of study



  1. Reading and Responding

  2. Creating and Presenting through Contexts

Outcomes


On completion of this unit the student should be able to;

  1. Develop and justify a detailed interpretation of selected texts.

  2. From a chosen Context, draw on a chosen text to create written texts for an audience with a purpose and to discuss their decisions about form, purpose, language, audience and context.

Assessment tasks



School Assessed Coursework

Contributes 25% to the final assessment


Assessment tasks for this unit include:

  1. An extended written interpretation of a selected text.

  2. Sustained written texts created for a specific audience and Context, with a written explanation of decisions about form, purpose, language, audience and context.


End of year Examination

Units 3 & 4 contributes 50% to the final assessment

ENGLISH LANGUAGE

RATIONALE

This study aims to enable students to further develop and refine their own skills in reading, writing, listening to and speaking English. Students learn about personal and public discourses in workplaces, fields of study, trades or social groups. They observe and discuss contemporary language in use to develop their analytical skills and understanding of linguistics. Knowledge of how language functions provides a useful basis for further study or employment in numerous fields.
AIMS

This study enables students to:

• describe and analyse the structures, features and functions of spoken and written English language, using an appropriate metalanguage

• investigate language acquisition, use, variation, and change over time

• reflect critically on attitudes to language in both its historical and contemporary contexts, with particular focus on identity, social cohesion and the distinctiveness of Australian language

• explore and analyse the interplay between convention and creativity in language use

• develop an awareness of their own critical, selective and innovative use of language and apply it to their own writing and speaking

• demonstrate, in the creation of their own texts, effective and competent use of Standard Australian




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