incorporating the Year Eleven and Twelve programs) Principal



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Summary of Courses



Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning (VCAL)


FIELD OF STUDY

VCAL FOUNDATION

VCAL INTERMEDIATE

VCAL

SENIOR


ENGLISH (Literacy)


Literacy


Foundation English

Literacy


Foundation English

Literacy


Foundation English


MATHEMATICS (Numeracy)


Mathematics


Mathematics


Mathematics




PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT

Personal Development


Personal Development


Personal Development




WORK RELATED SKILLS

Work Related Skills


Work Related Skills



Work Related Skills





INDUSTRY SPECIFIC SKILLS

VCE Arts – Technology subject


VET

VET


NOTES:

  • VCAL students may select additional VCE Units.

  • The VCAL program is flexible in that some VCAL studies may be substituted with a VCE study to satisfy the VCAL course requirement.

  • Students may be able to obtain a VCE Certificate and a VCAL Certificate. Careful course counseling is required.

For enquiries please see Mr D. Lynch.




Belmont High School

Year 11 and 12

Subject selection

Unit Descriptions



Index to Year 11 and 12 Unit Descriptions

Pages


 Accounting 29 - 31

 Art and Studio Arts 32 - 36

 Biology 37 - 40

 Business Management 41 - 42

 Chemistry 43 - 46

 Design and Technology – Wood/Metal/Fibre 47 - 48

 English 49 - 50


  • English Language ................................................................................................ 51 - 52

  • English as an Additional Language (EAL) ................................................................................................ 53 - 54

 Extended Investigation 55 - 56

 Food and Technology 57 - 58

 Geography 59 - 61

 Health and Human Development 62 - 63

 History 64

 History (Australian) 65

 History (Revolutions) 66

 Computing 67

 Informatics 68 - 69

 Software Development 70

 Legal Studies 71 - 72

 Literature 73 - 77

 Language – Indonesian 78 - 79

 Language – Italian 80 - 81

 Mathematics 82

- Unit Outlines – Year 11 Mathematics 81 - 85

- Unit Outlines – Year 12 Mathematics 85 - 89

 Media 90 - 92

 Music Performance 93 – 100


  • Music Investigation ……………………………………………………………………………………………...… 100 - 104

 Outdoor Education and Environmental Studies 105 - 106

 Physical Education 107 - 108

 Physics 109 – 111

 Environmental Science 112 – 114

 Psychology 115 – 118

 Systems Engineering 119 - 120



  • Theatre Studies …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 121

 Visual Communication Design 122 - 124

ACCOUNTING


Rationale

Accounting is the process of recording, reporting, analysing and interpreting financial data and information which is then communicated to internal and external users of the information. It plays an integral role in the successful operation and management of a small business.

VCE Accounting focuses on the financial recording, reporting and decision-making processes of a small business. Students will study both theoretical and practical aspects of accounting. Financial data and information will be collected, recorded and reported using both manual and information and communications technology (ICT) methods.

Many students will go on to further studies in business and finance, and other students will go on to become small business owners. The study of Accounting will enable them to develop their financial knowledge and skills.

UNIT 1: Going Into Business
This unit focuses on the establishment of a small business and the accounting and financial management of the business. Students are introduced to the processes of gathering, recording, reporting and analysing financial data and information used by internal and external users. Recording and reporting is restricted to the cash basis.

Students examine the role of accounting in the decision-making process using single entry recording of financial data and information for the owner of a service business.


Areas of study

1. Going into business

A potential small business owner needs to make many decisions before commencing the operations of the business. The decisions made at this stage will often influence the success or failure of the business. In this area of study, students investigate features of successful and unsuccessful businesses, sources of finance and how pre-operational decisions are made.


2. Recording and reporting accounting data and information

In this area of study, students investigate the role of accounting in the generation of financial data and information for the owner of a service business. The focus is on the recording and reporting of financial data and information using a single entry recording system. Students are required to use both manual and ICT methods in the recording and reporting process.


3. Financial decision-making

The owner of a small business must make many decisions every day. These decisions affect the business’s operations, and ultimately its chances of success or failure. Such decisions should be made on the basis of information generated by the accounting system. In this area of study, students apply the accounting skills they have learned in order to evaluate the financial and non-financial information of a service business.


Outcomes

On completion of this unit the student should be able to:

1. describe the resources and explain and apply the knowledge and skills necessary to set up a small business;

2. identify, record, report and explain the financial data and information for the owner of a service business, using a combination of manual and ICT methods;



3. apply accounting skills to evaluate financial and non-financial information in order to make informed decisions for a small business.


Assessment tasks

 Class tests

 Exercises using accounting software

 End of unit examination.

UNIT 2: Accounting for a Trading Business


This unit focuses on accounting for a single activity sole trader. Using the accrual approach, students use a single entry recording system for the recording and reporting of cash and credit transactions stock. They use financial and non-financial information to evaluate the performance of a business. Using these evaluations, students suggest strategies to the owner on how to improve the performance of the business.
Areas of study

1. Recording and reporting accounting data and information

A small business operator needs to input and process financial data to provide information for decision-making on the management and performance of the business. In this area of study students record and report the financial data and information of a single activity sole trader using the single entry system of recording. Both manual and ICT methods of recording and reporting are used.


2. ICT in accounting

ICT is an essential tool in the operation of a small business. This area of study enables students to develop an understanding of the role of ICT in the accounting process. Students use an accounting software package to record and report financial data and information for a single activity sole trader, and demonstrate their understanding of the importance of ICT in the accounting process.


3. Evaluation of business performance

The performance of a business should be measured and evaluated regularly. Using financial and non-financial information in this process will assist the owner in planning and decision-making for the future. This area of study focuses on an evaluation of a particular area(s) of the business such as stock or debtors, with students then suggesting strategies that will improve business performance.

Outcomes

On completion of this unit the student should be able to:

1. record and report financial data and information for a sole trader;

2. record and report financial data and information using an accounting software package for a single activity sole trader, and explain and evaluate the role of ICT in the accounting process;

3. select and use financial and non-financial information to evaluate a business and suggest strategies that will improve business performance.
Assessment tasks

School-Assessed Coursework

- Quick Books Pro Exercise

- Exercises involving manual recording and reporting

- Structured questions.
Mid Year Examination.

UNIT 3: Double Entry for Trading Businesses


Units 3 and 4 are designed to be taken as a sequence. Unit 3 focuses on accounting and financial issues of a small trading business, operating as a sole proprietor. Students are introduced to a double-entry system using the accrual basis of accounting. The unit emphasises the role of accounting as an information system and the role of information and communications technology in completing procedures. It also investigates alternative approaches in accounting and their impact on financial reports.
Areas of study

1. Recording, reporting and understanding accounting information.

2. Decision making.
Outcomes

For this unit students are required to demonstrate achievement of two outcomes. As a set these outcomes encompass both areas of study for the unit.


On completion of this unit the student should be able to:

1. record and report financial information using the double-entry accrual-based system for a single-activity sole-proprietor trading business, using manual and information and communications technology methods;



2. analyse the accounting issues of non-current asset valuation, revenue recognition and depreciation alternatives, and explain how these issues affect financial reports.


Assessment tasks

School-Assessed Coursework

- Exercises involving manual recording and reporting

- Structured questions.

UNIT 4: Control and Analysis of Business Performance


This unit provides an extension of the recording and reporting processes from Unit 3 and the use of financial and non-financial information in assisting management in the decision-making process. The unit covers the accrual recording and reporting system for a single activity trading business using the perpetual inventory recording system. Students learn about the role and importance of budgeting for the business and undertake the practical completion of budgets for cash, financial performance and financial position. In this unit students evaluate the information prepared and analyse the results in order to suggest strategies to the owner.
Areas of study

1. Extension of recording and reporting.

The collecting, measuring, processing and communication of accounting data and information is an important process for a sole trader. Students undertake this process using a double entry accrual-based recording and reporting system. The perpetual inventory method with First In, First Out (FIFO) will be used. This area of study allows students to build on the knowledge developed in Unit 3 of the accounting system.



2. Financial planning and decision-making.

The owner of a small business must be able to plan and control the future activities of the business. The preparation of budgeted accounting reports provides information for the owner in this decision-making process. This area of study focuses on the preparation of budgeted accounting reports by students, and the analysis of financial and non-financial information for a single activity sole trader. Students evaluate this information and suggest strategies to the owner on how to improve the performance of the business.


Outcomes

On completion of this unit the student should be able to:

1. record and report financial data and information using a double-entry accrual-based system for a single activity sole trader, and explain related aspects of this accounting system;

2. prepare and analyse budgets, evaluate a business using financial and non-financial information and suggest strategies to improve the profitability and liquidity of the business.




Assessment tasks

School-Assessed Coursework

- Exercises involving manual recording

- Preparation of budgets for cash, financial performance, financial position and cash variance using information and communications technology

- Written report on the evaluation of the financial performance of a business.


End of Unit Examination


ART and STUDIO ARTS

CAN I DO BOTH?



Within the VCE Art study, theoretical research and investigation informs art making. Students are encouraged to recognize the interplay between research and art making. VCE Studio Arts supports students to recognize their individual potential as professional art makers. The study involves the application of an individual design process to assist the student’s production of a folio of artworks.

The two studies are quite separate and both can be undertaken by any one student.
Year 9 students who have undertaken studies in both Art and/or Painting & Drawing are able to accelerate into Units 1 & 2. Year 10 students who have undertaken studies in Painting & Drawing, Printmaking, Ceramics, 3D Art, Fashion Design and Fashion Illustration may continue these pursuits in either Art or Studio Arts or both.

ART
RATIONALE

VCE Art encourages artistic development by allowing students to develop their own ideas and experiment with art materials to produce a folio of work. It also aims to give students the ability to understand the art of artists from various times and places.
AIMS

The study is designed to enable students to acquire a broad knowledge of art. This is achieved through both their practical work as well as the study of artists.

UNIT 1: Art
Areas of study

1. Artmaking and Personal Meaning (Folio) – Focuses on a folio of work that explores many techniques, materials and skills.

2. Art and Meaning (Appreciation) – Study of Australian artists and artworks.
Outcomes

On completion of this unit the student should be able to:

1. complete a folio of work using different materials and techniques;

2. analyse and interpret a variety of artworks.


Assessment tasks

Completion of a folio that contains developmental work and final artwork(s) (number to be chosen by student) that demonstrate experimentation in media and techniques within a particular art form or media.


Short-answer responses

UNIT 2: Art


Areas of study

1. Artmaking and Cultural Expression (Folio) – Demonstrate artistic and technical development in an area of personal interest.

2. Art and Culture (Appreciation) – Focuses on the study of at least one artwork from at least four different artists.
Outcomes

On completion of this unit the student should be able to:

1. demonstrate technical development and artistic development in an area of personal interest (Folio);

2. analyse, interpret, compare and contrast artworks from different cultures.

Assessment tasks

 Completion of a folio that contains developmental work and final artwork(s) exploring media of personal interest

- Written reports

- Short-answer responses.

UNIT 3: Art
Areas of study

1. Investigation and interpretation (Folio) – Focuses on making personal art responses through a broad and innovative exploration within selected media. Complete at least one finished artwork.

2. Interpreting art (Appreciation) – Focuses on artworks and the meaning behind them.
Outcomes

On completion of this unit the student should be able to:

1. undertake a broad and innovative investigation of media and materials to communicate individual ideas (Folio);

2. interpret different aspects of artworks meanings and messages and compare artworks (Appreciation).


Assessment tasks

School Assessed Coursework

Assessment tasks in the form of either written reports, essays or tests based on work for Outcome 2 (Unit 3) contribute to 10% of final assessment (Appreciation).


Examination

No Examination in Unit 3.

UNIT 4: Art


Areas of study

1. Realisation and resolution (Folio)

Focuses on the preparation and final presentation of directions explored in Unit 3. Complete at least one finished artwork.
2. Discussing and debating art (Appreciation)

Focuses on skills developed in Unit 3 and introduces the viewpoints expressed in commentaries to support and/or challenge art issues.


Outcomes

On completion of this unit the student should be able to:

1. realise and resolve with technical skill and awareness of aesthetic qualities, work that communicates personal concepts (Folio);

2. discuss commentaries on artworks and analyse selected artworks (Appreciation).


Assessment tasks

School Assessed Coursework

Assessment tasks in the form of open book short answer questions based on work covered for Outcome 2 (Unit 4) contribute 10% to final assessment (Appreciation).


School assessed tasks using criteria provided by the Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority for Outcome 1 (Unit 3) and Outcome 1 (Unit 4) combined to contribute 50% to final assessment (Folio).
Examination

The examination contributes 30% to final assessment and will require short and extended answers to questions based on Outcome 2 (Unit 3) and Outcome 2 (Unit 4).


Duration of Task: 1.5 hours

Date of Task: End of year on a date to be notified

STUDIO ARTS


RATIONALE
VCE Studio Arts encourages and supports students to recognise their individual potential as artists and develop their understanding and development of art making. VCE Studio Arts broadens students’ understanding of, and ability to engage with, artworks. It equips students with the knowledge and skills to pursue an art studio practice and follow tertiary and industry pathways in fine art, research and education. The study also offers students opportunities for personal development and encourages them to make an ongoing contribution to society and the culture of their community through lifelong participation in the making and viewing of artworks.

AIMS


This study enables students to:

  • Express themselves creatively through art making and come to understand how to support and sustain their art practice

  • Develop an individual studio process, and practice and refine specialised skills appropriate to particular art forms and media selected for art making

  • Analyse and draw inspiration from the ways in which artists apply studio processes in the production of their individual artworks

  • Develop an understanding of historical and cultural contexts in the production and analysis of artworks

  • Develop and apply skills in visual analysis, including the use of appropriate terminology in relation to their own artwork and artists studied

  • Extend their understanding of the roles and methods involved in the presentation of artworks in a range of gallery and exhibition spaces

  • Develop an understanding of professional art practices related to the exhibition of artworks to an audience, including the roles and methods involved in the presentation of artworks in a range of gallery and exhibition spaces.

UNIT 1: Studio Art


Areas of study

1. Researching and recording ideas - Focus on researching and recording ideas in a visual diary

2. Studio Practice - Focus on the use of materials and techniques in the production of at least one artwork in a visual diary

3. Interpreting art ideas and use of materials and techniques - Focus on the ways artists from different times and cultures have interpreted ideas and sources of inspiration and used materials and techniques.


Outcomes

On completion of this unit the student should be able to:

1. Identify sources of inspiration and artistic influences and outline individual ideas, art forms and aesthetic qualities, and translate these into visual language.

2. Produce at least one finished artwork and progressively record the development of their studio practice, conveying individual ideas through the exploration of materials and techniques in the selected art form/s.

3. Discuss the artistic practice of artists from different times and cultures, their sources of inspiration, materials and techniques for at least two artworks by each artist.
Assessment tasks


  • Outcomes 1 and 2 - a selection of exploratory work and a visual diary, showing sources of ideas and inspiration translated into visual form through the use of a variety of materials and techniques.

  • Outcome 3 - short answer and extended responses

UNIT 2: Studio Art


Areas of study

1. Explorarion of studio practice and development of artworks - focus on developing artworks through an individual studio process based on visual research and inquiry.

2. Ideas and styles in artworks. Focus on an analysis of historical and contemporary artworks.
Outcomes

On completion of this unit the student should be able to:

1. Develop an individual exploration proposal to form the basis of a studio process, and from this produce and document a variety of potential directions in a visual diary for at least one artwork

2. Compare a range of historical and contemporary art periods, styles or movements, and analyse the ways in which artists communicate ideas, develop styles and demonstrate aesthetic qualities in artworks.


Assessment tasks

Outcome 1 - undertake an exploration proposal, studio process in the production of at least one artwork.



  • Outcome 2 - short answer and extended responses

UNIT 3: Studio Art
Areas of study

1. Exploration Proposal – students develop an exploration proposal that creates a framework for the individual studio process.

2. Studio Process - students progressively refine their ideas, techniques, materials and processes and aesthetic qualities discussed in the exploration proposal. Throughout the individual studio process, students keep a visual diary and investigate the focus, subject matter, sources of inspiration and art form/s through the exploration and development of ideas, materials, techniques, art elements, art principles and demonstration of aesthetic qualities.

3. Artists and studio practices – students focus on professional studio practices in relation to particular art forms. Students investigate the ways in which artists have interpreted subject matter, influences, historical and cultural contexts, and communicated ideas and meaning in their artworks. Students are required to study at least two artists and two artworks by each artist. They consider the artists’ use of materials, techniques and processes, and the use of art elements and art principles to demonstrate aesthetic qualities and styles in artworks.


Outcomes

On completion of this unit the student should be able to:

1. Prepare an exploration proposal that formulates the content and parameters of an individual studio process including a plan of how the proposal will be undertaken.

2. Present an individual studio process recorded in written and visual form that produces a range of potential directions, and reflects the concepts and ideas documented in the exploration proposal and work plan.t a design process that produces a range of potential directions to the ideas and aims in the work brief

3. Examine the practice of at least two artists, with reference to two artworks by each artist, referencing the different historical and cultural context of each artwork.
Assessment

School-assessed Task - An exploration proposal and a visual diary that presents an individual studio process, which explores and develops the concepts and ideas set out in the exploration proposal, and produces a range of visual explorations and potential directions that will form the basis of at least two finished artworks in Unit 4.

School-assessed Coursework – Students respond to ways in which two different artists, with reference to at least two artworks have interpreted subject matter, influences, historical and cultural contexts, and communicated ideas and meaning in their artworks. They consider the artists’ use of materials, techniques and processes, and the use of art elements and art principles to demonstrate aesthetic qualities and styles in artworks.


  • External assessment - The level of achievement for Units 3 and 4 is also assessed by an end-of-year examination, which will contribute 30 per cent.

UNIT 4: Studio Art


Areas of study

1. Production and presentation of artworks – students focus on the refinement and presentation of artworks developed from the selected potential directions identified in the individual studio process in Unit 3.

2. Evaluation - students provide visual and written documentation of the selected potential directions that are the basis for the development of the artworks. When the artworks have been completed, students examine and reflect on the communication of ideas, the use of materials and techniques, the demonstration of aesthetic qualities and the relationships that have been formed through the presentation of artworks.

3. Art industry contexts - students focus on the analysis of artworks and the requirements and conditions of the environments where artworks are displayed. Students examine a variety of art exhibitions and review the methods and considerations involved in the preparation, presentation and conservation of artworks. As part of this requirement, students visit at least two different art exhibitions in their current year of study.

Outcomes

On completion of this unit the student should be able to:

1. Present at least two finished artworks based on selected and evaluated potential directions developed through the studio process, which demonstrate refinement and application of materials and techniques, and that realise and communicate the student’s ideas expressed in the exploration proposal.

2. Provide visual and written documentation that identifies and evaluates the extent to which the artworks reflect the selected potential directions, and effectively demonstrates a cohesive relationship between the works.

3. Compare the methods used by artists and considerations of curators in the preparation, presentation, conservation and promotion of specific artworks in at least two different exhibitions.
Assessment tasks

School-assessed Task - The presentation of at least two finished artworks with an evaluation of studio processes.

School-assessed Coursework – students examine a variety of art exhibitions and review the methods and considerations involved in the preparation, presentation and conservation of artworks. As part of this requirement, students visit at least two different art exhibitions in their current year of study.


  • External assessment - The level of achievement for Units 3 and 4 is also assessed by an end-of-year examination, which will contribute 30 per cent.

BIOLOGY


Scope of study

Biology is a diverse and evolving science discipline that seeks to understand and explore the nature of life, past and present. The study explores the dynamic relationships between organisms and their interactions with the non-living environment. It also explores the processes of life, from the molecular world of the cell to that of the whole organism, that maintain life and ensure its continuity.
Rationale

VCE Biology enables students to investigate the processes involved in sustaining life at cellular, system, species and ecosystem levels. In undertaking this study, students examine how life has evolved over time and understand that in the dynamic and interconnected system of life all change has a consequence that may affect an individual, a species or the collective biodiversity of Earth. The study gives students insights into how knowledge of molecular and evolutionary concepts underpin much of contemporary biology, and the applications used by society to resolve problems and make advancements.


In VCE Biology students develop a range of inquiry skills involving practical experimentation and research, analytical skills including critical and creative thinking, and communication skills. Students use scientific and cognitive skills and understanding to analyse contemporary biology-related issues, and communicate their views from an informed position.

VCE Biology provides for continuing study pathways within the discipline and leads to a range of careers.

Branches of biology include botany, genetics, immunology, microbiology, pharmacology and zoology. In addition, biology is applied in many fields of endeavour including biotechnology, dentistry, ecology, education, food science, forestry, health care, horticulture, medicine, optometry, physiotherapy and veterinary science. Biologists also work in cross-disciplinary areas such as bushfire research, environmental management and conservation, forensic science, geology, medical research and sports science.
Aims
This study enables students to:


  • develop knowledge and understanding of key biological models, theories and concepts, from the cell to the whole organism

  • develop a range of individual and collaborative science investigation skills through experimental and inquiry tasks in the field and in the laboratory.

  • develop an informed perspective on contemporary science-based issues of local and global significance.

  • develop attitudes that include curiosity, open-mindedness, creativity, flexibility, integrity, attention to detail and respect for evidence-based conclusions.

  • understand and apply the research, ethical and safety principles that govern the study and practice of the discipline in the collection, analysis, critical evaluation and reporting of data

  • communicate clearly and accurately an understanding of the discipline using appropriate terminology, conventions and formats.


Entry
There are no prerequisites for entry to Units 1, 2 and 3. Students must undertake Unit 3 prior to undertaking Unit 4.

It is not recommended that students would enter Unit 2 without first completing Unit 1.

It is not recommended that students would enter Unit 3 without Units 1 and/or 2. If they do they would be required to undertake significant additional preparation as prescribed by their teacher.



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