incorporating the Year Eleven and Twelve programs) Principal



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Outcomes

On completion of this unit the student should be able to:

1. explain factors which influence outdoor experiences and their impact on nature;

2. analyse policy and procedures for minimising human impact.


Assessment tasks

 Oral presentations  Tests

 Practical reports  Short reports

 Written responses


UNIT 3: Relationships with Outdoor Environments
This unit considers the ecological, historical and social contexts of relationships between humans and environments in Australia.
Areas of study

1. Historical perspectives of the Australian environment.

2. Contemporary relationships with outdoor environments.
Outcomes

On completion of this unit the student should be able to:

1. analyse how particular perceptions and relationships have influenced an outdoor environment;

2. explain the evolution of human-nature relationships.


Assessment tasks

 Written report  Short essay

 Practical report  Test

 Data analysis  Multi-media presentation

UNIT 4: Future of Natural Environments
This unit focuses on sustainable use and management of natural environments. It emphasises the need to develop a balance between human requirements and the conservation of the environment.
Areas of study

1. Healthy natural environments.

2. Sustaining environments.
Outcomes

On completion of this unit the student should be able to:

1. describe the contemporary state of the environment

2. evaluate practices and strategies for sustainable interaction between humans and outdoor environments;


Assessment tasks

 Written report  Short essay

 Data analysis  Test

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

UNIT 1: Learning and Improving Skills
This unit looks at a range of factors that influences learning and improving physical skills and the role of the coach.
Areas of study

1. Movement analysis.

2. Coaching for enhanced performance.
Outcomes

For this unit students are required to demonstrate achievement of two outcomes. As a set these outcomes encompass both areas of study for the unit.


On completion of this unit the student should be able to:

  1. Explain the application of biomechanical and skill learning principles in analysis and how motor skills are learned and improved.

  2. Identify and evaluate a range of coaching practices that enhance performance.

Assessment tasks



The award of satisfactory completion of this unit is based on a decision that the student has demonstrated achievement of the set of outcomes specified for this unit.


Assessment tasks for this unit include:

 written reports  laboratory reports

 tests  case study analysis

 structured questions  media analysis

 oral reports  exam.

UNIT 2: The Active Body
This unit looks at a range of factors that influences learning and improving physical skills and the role of the coach.
Areas of study

1. Body systems and performance.



2. Impact of physical activity on the individual.
Outcomes

For this unit students are required to demonstrate achievement

of two outcomes. As a set these encompass both areas of study

for the unit.
On completion of the unit the student should be able to:


  1. Explain how the musculo-skeletal, cardio respiratory and energy systems function during physical activity.

  2. Explain the impact of participation in physical activity on the health of populations and analyse factors affecting participation.

Assessment tasks

The award of satisfactory completion of this unit is based on a decision that the student has demonstrated achievement of the set of outcomes specified for this unit.
Assessment tasks for this unit include:

 written reports  laboratory reports

 tests  case study analysis

 structured questions  media analysis

 oral reports  exam.
UNIT 3: The Physiological & Participatory Perspectives of Physical Activity
This unit introduces students to an understanding of physical activity from a physiological and participatory perspective. It examines the concept of physical fitness and the contribution of energy systems to performance in physical activity. It also examines why people initially begin and continue with physical activity and models/strategies used to promote it.
Areas of study

1. Monitoring and promotion of physical activity.

2. Physiological requirements of physical activity.
Outcomes

On completion of this unit the student should be able to:

1. analyse individual and population levels of physical activity and evaluate strategies used to promote it;

2. analyse the role and relative contribution of the energy systems during physical activity.


Assessment tasks

The student’s level of achievement will be determined by school-assessed coursework and an end-of-year examination.


Assessment tasks for this unit include:

 written reports  laboratory reports

 tests  case study analysis

 structured questions  video analysis

 oral reports  data analysis.

UNIT 4: Enhancing Physical Performance


This unit examines the factors that influence an individual’s initial and life-long involvement in physical activity.
Areas of study

1. Enhancing fitness through training.

2. Strategies for enhancing sports performance.


Outcomes

On completion of this unit the student should be able to:

1. plan and evaluate training programs;

2. evaluate practices/strategies that aim to enhance sports performance.


Assessment tasks

The student’s level of achievement will be determined by

school-assessed coursework and an end-of-year examination.
Assessment tasks for this unit include:

 written reports  data analysis

 structured questions  media analysis

 laboratory reports  video analysis

 case study analysis  tests.

PHYSICS
Introduction


Scope of study

Physics seeks to understand and explain the physical world. It examines models and ideas used to make sense of the world and which are sometimes challenged as new knowledge develops. By looking at the way matter and energy interact through observations, measurements and experiments, physicists gain a better understanding of the underlying laws of nature.


VCE Physics provides students with opportunities to explore questions related to the natural and constructed world including atomic physics, electricity, fields, mechanics, thermodynamics, quantum physics and waves. Students also have options for study related to astrophysics, bioelectricity, biomechanics, electronics, flight, medical physics, nuclear energy, nuclear physics, optics, sound and sports science. Students examine classical and contemporary research, models and theories to understand how knowledge in physics has evolved and continues to evolve in response to new evidence and discoveries.


Rationale
Physics is a natural science based on observations, experiments, measurements and mathematical analysis with the purpose of finding quantitative explanations for phenomena occurring from the subatomic scale through to the planets, stellar systems and galaxies in the Universe. While much scientific understanding in physics has stood the
test of time, many other areas continue to evolve. They undertake practical activities and apply physics principles to explain and quantify both natural and constructed phenomena.

VCE Physics provides for continuing study pathways within the discipline and leads to a range of careers.


Physicists may undertake research and development in specialist areas including acoustics, astrophysics and cosmology, atmospheric physics, computational physics, education, energy research, engineering, instrumentation, lasers and photonics, medical physics, nuclear science, optics, pyrotechnics and radiography. Physicists also work in cross-disciplinary areas such as bushfire research, climate science, forensic science, geology, materials science,
neuroscience and sports science.

Aims
This study enables students to:

• apply physics models, theories and concepts to describe, explain, analyse and make predictions about diverse physical

phenomena.


• develop a range of individual and collaborative science investigation skills through experimental and inquiry tasks in the

field and in the laboratory

• develop an informed perspective on contemporary science-based issues of local and global significance.
• apply their scientific understanding to familiar and to unfamiliar situations, including personal, social, environmental and

technological contexts.

• communicate clearly and accurately an understanding of the discipline using appropriate terminology, conventions and

formats.


Entry
There are no prerequisites for entry to Units 1, 2 and 3. Students must undertake Unit 3 prior to undertaking Unit 4.
It is

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