incorporating the Year Eleven and Twelve programs) Principal



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Close analysis


In this area of study students focus on detailed scrutiny of the language, style, concerns and construction of texts. Students attend closely to textual details to examine the ways specific features and/or passages in a text contributes to their overall interpretations. Students consider features of texts including structure, context, ideas, images, characters and situations, and the language in which these are expressed. They develop their interpretations using detailed reference to the text, logical sequencing of ideas and persuasive language.

Outcome 2


On completion of this unit the student should be able to analyse features of texts and develop and justify interpretations of texts.
To achieve this outcome the student will draw on key knowledge and key skills outlined in Area of Study 2.

Key knowledge


  • the effects and nuances of language

  • the significance of key passages in interpreting a text

  • the connections between features of a text in developing an interpretation

  • the views and values suggested in a text

  • the conventions appropriate to presenting an interpretation.

Key skills


  • discuss how certain passages in a text can reveal developments in a text

  • analyse the features of a text and make appropriate connections between them

  • analyse how key passages and features in a text contribute to an interpretation

  • synthesise the various elements of the text into a coherent view.

LANGUAGE – INDONESIAN

RATIONALE and AIMS

The study of Indonesian contributes to the overall education of our students who live in a culturally diverse world. Areas of focus are communication, cross-cultural understanding and awareness, literacy and general knowledge. The culture of our Indonesian-speaking neighbors is a prominent focus. Students discover the potential to apply Indonesian to work, further study, training or leisure.



VCE UNIT 1: Indonesian

Areas of study

1. Gaya Kehidupan (Lifestyles)

2. Geografi dan Lingkungan (Geography and the Environment)

3. Hiburan dan Remaja (Entertainment and Young people)
Outcomes

On completion of this unit the student should be able to establish and maintain a conversation, write about personal experiences, listen for and read for specific information and respond personally to real or imaginative experiences.


Assessment tasks

 Speaking Task - Informal conversation

 Reading Task - read, extract and reorganize information

 Listening Task - listen to conversations/interviews and extract information

 Writing Task - review or article, letter or email

VCE UNIT 2: Indonesian


Areas of study

1. Bertamasya (Visiting Indonesia)

2. Sejarah dan cerita dari zaman dahulu (History and stories of the past)

3. Pahlawan (Heroes)


Outcomes

On completion of this unit the student should be able to learn to negotiate through role plays, read and listen to information and write or perform a personal or imaginative piece.


Assessment tasks

 Speaking Task - Role play or Interview

 Reading Task – read, extract and reorganize information

 Listening Task - listen to conversations/interviews and extract information



 Writing Task - a formal letter/fax or email, journal entry/personal account/short story.

VCE UNIT 3: Indonesian


Areas of study

1. Adat Istiadat (Customs and traditions).

2. Kesehatan (Health)

3. Cita-cita dan Pekerjaan (Aspirations and Work).


Outcomes

On completion of this unit the student should be able to express ideas through speaking and writing, analyse and use information they have heard, and exchange information, opinions and experiences through speaking and writing.


Assessment tasks

 Writing Task - a 250 word personal or imaginative written piece.

 Listening Task - response to specific questions, messages or instructions, extracting and using the information requested.

 Speaking Task – a 3-4 minute role-play, focusing on the resolution of an issue.

VCE UNIT 4: Indonesian
Areas of study

1. Pengaruh Barat (Western Influences)

2. Detailed study.

3. Revision


Outcomes

On completion of this unit the student should be able to analyse and use information from written texts, respond critically to spoken and written texts which reflect aspects of the language and culture.


Assessment tasks

 Reading Task - response to specific questions, messages, instructions, extracting and using information requested

 Writing Task – a 250-300 word informative or persuasive written response

 Speaking Task - a 3-4 minute interview on an issue related to the texts studied.


Examination
Oral Exam: Conversation and Discussion (15 minutes)

Written Exam: Listening, Reading and Writing (2 hours writing 15 minutes reading time)



LANGUAGE – ITALIAN


VCE Italian
RATIONALE and AIMS

The study of Italian contributes to the overall education of our students who live in a culturally diverse world. Areas of focus are communication, cross-cultural understanding and awareness, literacy and general knowledge. The students discover the potential to apply Italian to work, further study, training or leisure.


The Program explores the Italian language and culture under three main themes: THE INDIVIDUAL; THE LOTE SPEAKING COMMUNITIES; THE CHANGING WORLD. Each theme is further divided into many subtopics.

THE INDIVIDUAL

THE LOTE SPEAKING COMMUNITIES

THE CHANGING WORLD

Personal World

Historical perspectives

The World of Work

Health and Leisure

Lifestyle in Italy and Abroad

Technology

Education and Aspirations

The Arts and Entertainment

Trade and Commerce




Social and Contemporary Issues

Tourism and Hospitality
VCE UNIT 1: Italian

Areas of study



  • L’identita` e famiglia (Identity and Family)

  • I miei amici (My Friends)

  • I miei hobby (My hobbies)

  • La scuola (School)

  • Il Futuro ( The Future)

Outcomes


On completion of this unit the student should be able to establish and maintain a conversation, write about personal experiences, listen for and read for specific information and respond personally to real or imaginative experiences.
Assessment tasks

 Speaking Task - Informal conversation

 Reading Task - read, extract and reorganize information

 Listening Task - listen to conversations/interviews and extract information

 Writing Task - review or article, letter or email

VCE UNIT 2: Italian

Areas of study



  • Le Superstizioni (Superstitions)

  • Le Donne e Lavoro (Women and the Workplace)

  • Prodotti Italiani “Il Made In Italy” ( Italian Products)

  • Commercio tra Italia ed Australia (Commerce Trade between Italy and Australia)

Outcomes


On completion of this unit the student should be able to learn to negotiate through role plays, read and listen to information and write or perform a personal or imaginative piece.

Assessment tasks

 Speaking Task - Role play or Interview

 Reading Task – read, extract and reorganize information

 Listening Task - listen to conversations/interviews and extract information

 Writing Task - a formal letter/fax or email, journal entry/personal account/short story

VCE UNIT 3: Italian
Areas of study


  • Le Fiabe (Fairytales)

  • Gruppi di Minoranza in Italia e in Australia ( Minority groups in Italy and in Australia)

  • I Rom (The Rom gypsies)

Outcomes


On completion of this unit the student should be able to express ideas through speaking and writing, analyse and use information they have heard, and exchange information, opinions and experiences through speaking and writing.
Assessment tasks

  • Writing Task - a 250 word personal or imaginative written piece.

  • Listening Task - response to specific questions, messages or instructions, extracting and using the information requested.

  • Speaking Task – a 3-4 minute role-play, focusing on the resolution of an issue.

VCE UNIT 4: Italian


Areas of study

  • Le origini del ghetto (The origins of the ghetto)

  • Detailed study

  • Revision

Outcomes


On completion of this unit the student should be able to analyse and use information from written texts, respond critically to spoken and written texts which reflect aspects of the language and culture.
Assessment tasks

  • Reading Task - response to specific questions, messages, instructions, extracting and using information requested.

  • Writing Task – a 250-300 word informative or persuasive written response.

  • Speaking Task - a 3-4 minute interview on an issue related to the texts studied.

Detailed Study

The Detailed Study enables the students to explore and compare aspects of the language and the culture of the Italian speaking community through a range of oral and written texts in the target language. The students are expected to discuss their Detailed Study through the texts chosen as reference, in the second part of the oral exam (8 minutes)

The topic of the Detailed Study is: I Ghetti in Italia (The Ghettos in Italy)


Oral Exam

The oral exam is made up by two sessions:



  • Conversation (approximately 7 minutes)

  • Discussion (approximately 8 minutes on chosen aspects of the Detailed Study)

The assessment criteria include: communication, content and language
Written Exam

The written exam is held over two hours and includes 15 minutes of reading time. It includes three sections:



  • Listening and responding

  • Reading and responding

  • Writing

The assessment criteria focus on comprehension and the ability to convey clear and accurate messages.
MATHEMATICS
RATIONALE

Mathematics is the study of function and pattern in number, logic, space and structure. It provides both a framework for thinking and a means of symbolic communication that is powerful, logical, concise and unambiguous and a means by which people can understand and manage their environment.


UNDERLYING PRINCIPLE

It is an underlying principle of the Mathematics study that all students will engage in the following mathematical activities:


1. Apply knowledge and skills

The study of aspects of the existing body of mathematical knowledge through learning and practising mathematical algorithms, routines and techniques, and using them to find solutions to standard problems.


2. Model, investigate and solve problems

The creative application of mathematical knowledge and skills in unfamiliar situations, including real-life situations, which require investigative, modelling or problem-solving approaches.


3. Use technology

The effective and appropriate use of technology to produce results which support learning mathematics and its application in different contexts.


Unit Outlines – Year 11 Mathematics


UNITS 1 AND 2: Foundation Mathematics
Foundation Mathematics provides for the continuing mathematical development of students entering VCE needing mathematical skills to support their other VCE subjects including VET and VCAL programs and who do not intend to undertake Unit 3 and 4 studies in VCE Mathematics in the following year.
In Foundation Mathematics there is a strong emphasis on using mathematics in practical contexts relating to everyday life, personal work and study. Students are encouraged to use appropriate technology in all areas of their study. These units will be especially useful for students undertaking VET and VCAL programs.
At the end of Unit 1, students will be expected to have covered material equivalent to at least two of the areas of study. Unit 2 is intended to complement Unit 1 in development of the course material.
Areas of study

The areas of study for Units 1 and 2 of Foundation Mathematics are ‘Space and shape’, ‘Patterns in number’, ‘Handling data’ and ‘Measurement and design’.


Outcomes

For each unit students are required to demonstrate achievement of three outcomes.


On completion of each unit the student should be able to:

1. use confidently and competently mathematical skills and concepts from at least two areas of study of ‘Space and shape’, ‘Patterns in number’, ‘Handling data’ and ‘Measurement and design’;

2. apply and discuss basic mathematical procedures in contexts relating to familiar situations, personal work and study;

3. select and use technology to apply mathematics to a range of practical contexts.




Assessment tasks

Assessment tasks for Outcome 1 – a selection of:

 assignments

 summary or review notes

 tests.


Assessment tasks for Outcome 2 are:

 a report on an application or use of mathematics; for example, costing of an eighteenth birthday party, budgeting for a holiday, a survey of types of television programs, design of a car park

 a presentation in oral, written, poster, or multimedia format (for example, presentation software), on mathematics that students have encountered in personal work or study; for example, mathematics encountered in the study of another VCE subject, or encountered in a part-time work or work-experience location, or in daily experience.
Assessment tasks for Outcome 3: although some specific tasks may be set to enable this outcome to be demonstrated, some or all of the assessment tasks for Outcomes 1 and 2 will incorporate the effective and appropriate use of technology and enable assessment of Outcome 3.

UNITS 1 AND 2: General Mathematics


RATIONALE

General Mathematics provides courses of study for diverse groups of students. Most students studying General Mathematics will intend to study Further Mathematics 3 & 4.



Areas of study




  1. Arithmetic




  1. Graphs of linear and non-linear equations




  1. Data analysis and simulation




  1. Decision and business mathematics




  1. Algebra




  1. Geometry and trigonometry.



Each unit will cover four or more topics selected from at least three of the above Areas of Study.


Outcomes

For each unit students are required to demonstrate achievement of three outcomes. As a set these outcomes encompass all of the selected areas of study for each unit.


On completion of each unit the student should be able to:

1. define and explain key concepts, in relation to the topics from the selected areas of study, and apply a range of related mathematical routines and procedures;

2. apply mathematical processes in non-routine contexts and analyse and discuss these applications in at least three of the areas of study;

3. use technology to produce results and carry out analysis in situations requiring problem solving, modelling or investigative techniques or approaches in at least three of the areas of study.


A CAS calculator is required for General Mathematics A and highly recommended for General Mathematics B.
Assessment tasks

For each unit demonstration of the achievement of Outcome 1 must be based on the student’s performance on a selection of the following tasks. Assessment tasks for this outcome are:

 assignments

 tests


 summary or review notes.
For each unit demonstration of the achievement of Outcome 2 must be based on the student’s performance on a selection of the following tasks. Assessment tasks for this outcome are:

 projects

short written responses

 problem-solving tasks

 modelling tasks.

For each unit demonstration of the achievement of Outcome 3 must be based on the student’s performance on a selection of tasks completed in demonstrating achievement of Outcomes 1 and 2 which incorporate the effective and appropriate use of technology in contexts related to topics in the selected material from the areas of study.


UNITS 1 AND 2: Mathematical Methods CAS


Areas of study

Mathematical Methods Units 1 and 2 are designed as a preparation for Mathematical Methods Units 3 and 4. The areas of study for each of Units 1 and 2 are ‘Functions and graphs’, ‘Algebra’, ‘Calculus’ and ‘Probability’.


Outcomes

For each unit students are required to demonstrate achievement of three outcomes.


On completion of this unit the student should be able to:

1. define and explain key concepts as specified in the content from the ‘Functions and graphs’, ‘Algebra’, ‘Calculus’ and ‘Probability’ areas of study, and to apply a range of related mathematical routines and procedures;

2. apply mathematical processes in non-routine contexts and to analyse and discuss these applications of mathematics;

3. use technology to produce results and carry out analysis in situations requiring problem-solving, modelling or investigative techniques or approaches.


Assessment tasks

Assessment tasks for Outcome 1, a selection of:

 assignments

 tests; and/or

 summary or review notes.
Assessment tasks for Outcome 2, a selection of:

 projects

 short written responses

 problem-solving tasks; and/or

 modelling tasks.
Some assessment tasks will be technology free (to reflect what happens in Exam 1 in Year 12).
Some or all of the assessment tasks for Outcomes 1 and 2 will incorporate the effective and appropriate use of technology to enable assessment of Outcome 3.
To study Mathematical Methods (CAS) Units 1 & 2 students must have a sound background in number, algebra, function, sets and probability and related aspects of working mathematically including the effective use of technology for numerical, graphical or symbolic computation.
A CASIO CLASSPAD CAS calculator is essential for this study and students without one will be severely disadvantaged with their preparation for Mathematical Methods CAS Units 3&4.

UNITS 1 AND 2: Specialist Mathematics (General A)


RATIONALE

Most students studying Specialist Mathematics Units 1 & 2 will also be studying Mathematical Methods 1 & 2 and intend to study Mathematical Methods 3 & 4 and in some cases Specialist Mathematics Units 3 & 4.




Areas of study/Topics




UNIT 1

UNIT 2

  1. Number Systems

  1. Algebra

  1. Transformations

  1. Non-Linear Graphs

  1. Algebra

  1. Linear Programming

  1. Trigonometry

  1. Geometry

  1. Sequences and series

  1. Vectors

  1. Variation

  1. Kinematics & Dynamics







Specialist Mathematics 1 & 2 will focus on Functions and Graphs, Algebra, Geometry and Trigonometry in preparation for Units 3 & 4

Outcomes


For each unit students are required to demonstrate achievement of three outcomes. As a set these outcomes encompass all of the selected areas of study for each unit.
On completion of each unit the student should be able to:

1. define and explain key concepts, in relation to the topics from the selected areas of study, and apply a range of related mathematical routines and procedures;

2. apply mathematical processes in non-routine contexts and analyse and discuss these applications in at least three of the areas of study;

3. use technology to produce results and carry out analysis in situations requiring problem solving, modelling or investigative techniques or approaches in at least three of the areas of study.


A CAS calculator is required for Specialist Mathematics and students will be disadvantaged without one.
Assessment tasks

For each unit demonstration of the achievement of Outcome 1 must be based on the student’s performance on a selection of the following tasks. Assessment tasks for this outcome are:

 assignments

 tests
For each unit demonstration of the achievement of Outcome 2 must be based on the student’s performance on a selection of the following tasks. Assessment tasks for this outcome are:

 short written responses

 problem-solving and application tasks


For each unit demonstration of the achievement of Outcome 3 must be based on the student’s performance on a selection of tasks completed in demonstrating achievement of Outcomes 1 and 2 which incorporate the effective and appropriate use of technology in contexts related to topics in the selected material from the areas of study.
Some assessment tasks will be technology free (to reflect what happens in Exam 1 in Year 12).

Unit Outlines – Year 12 Mathematics


UNITS 3 AND 4: Further Mathematics


YEAR 11



YEAR 12

RATIONALE

Further Mathematics Units 3 and 4 are intended to be widely accessible. They provide general preparation for employment or further study. The assumed knowledge for Further Mathematics Units 3 and 4 is drawn from General Mathematics Units 1 and 2; students who have done only Mathematical Methods Units 1 and 2 will also have had access to this assumed knowledge.


Areas of study

1. ‘Data analysis’ (Core material)


2. ‘Applications’ (Module material), which consists of five modules:

 Module 1: Number patterns and applications

 Module 2: Geometry and trigonometry

 Module 3: Graphs and relations

 Module 4: Business related mathematics

 Module 5: Networks and decision mathematics.



SPECIALIST MATHS

UNITS 1 & 2

SPECIALIST MATHS

UNITS 3 & 4



MATHS METHODS

CAS


UNITS 1 & 2

MATHS METHODS

CAS


UNITS 3 & 4

GENERAL

MATHS


UNITS 1 & 2

FURTHER

MATHS


UNITS 3 & 4

UNIT 3: Further Mathematics


Outcomes

For Unit 3 these outcomes encompass ‘Data analysis’ and one module from the ‘Applications’ area of study.


On completion of this unit the student should be able to:

1. define and explain key terms and concepts as specified in the content from the areas of study, and use this knowledge to apply related mathematical procedures to solve routine application problems;

2. use mathematical concepts and skills developed in the ‘Data analysis’ area of study to analyse a practical and extended situation and interpret the outcomes of this analysis in relation to key features of that situation;

3. select and appropriately use technology to develop mathematical ideas, produce results and carry out analysis in situations requiring problem-solving, modelling or investigative techniques or approaches in the areas of study ‘Data analysis’ and the selected module from the ‘Applications’ areas of study.


School assessed coursework

School-assessed coursework for Unit 3 will contribute 20 per cent.


1. Application task

A data analysis application task with several components of increasing complexity. All outcomes will be covered by components of the task.


2. Analysis task

A short item of 2-4 hours duration over 1-2 days selected from, e.g. a short and focused investigation, challenging problem or modelling task.


Outcomes 1 and 2 should be covered across the two Analysis tasks. The use of technology (Outcome 3) should be incorporated in the assessment task selected to demonstrate achievement of at least one of Outcomes 1 and 2.

UNIT 4: Further Mathematics


Areas of study

Two modules are selected from the ‘Applications’ areas of study.


Outcomes

On completion of this unit the student should be able to:

1. define and explain key terms and concepts as specified in the content from the ‘Applications’ area of study, and use this knowledge to apply related mathematical procedures to solve routine application problems;

2. apply mathematical processes in contexts related to the ‘Applications’ area of study and analyse and discuss these applications of mathematics;

3. select and appropriately use technology in order to develop mathematical ideas, produce results and carry out analysis in situations requiring problem-solving, modelling or investigative techniques or approaches related to the selected modules for this unit from the ‘Applications’ areas of study.
School assessed coursework

Unit 4 will contribute 14 per cent to the final assessment.


Analysis task 1

This task relates to one of the selected ‘Application’ modules in Unit 4. It is a short item of 2-4 hours duration over 1-2 days selected from, for example:

 an assignment where students have the opportunity to work on a broader range of problems; or

 a short and focused investigation, challenging problem or modelling task; or

 a set of application questions requiring extended response analysis in relation to a particular topic or topics; or

 item response analysis for a collection of multiple choice questions.


Analysis task 2

This task relates to the second selected ‘Applications’ module in Unit 4. It is a short item of 2-4 hours duration over 1-2 days selected from, for example:

 an assignment where students have the opportunity to work on a broader range of problems; or

 a short and focused investigation, challenging problem or modelling task; or

 a set of application questions requiring extended response analysis in relation to a particular topic or topics; or

 item response analysis for a collection of multiple-choice questions.


This task is to be a different type to that selected for Analysis task 1.
Outcomes 1 and 2 should be covered across the two Analysis tasks.

The use of technology (Outcome 3) should be incorporated in the assessment task selected to demonstrate achievement of at least one of Outcomes 1 and 2.


Examination

Units 3 and 4 will also be assessed by two end-of-year examinations, which will contribute 66 per cent to the final assessment.






Examination 1 (Facts, Skills and Applications Task)

Multiple choice questions covering the core and selected modules.


Examination 2 (Analysis Task)

Four sets of extended answer questions from Data Analysis and the three selected modules.


* Student access to a graphics or CAS calculator will be assumed by the VCAA exam setting panel.

UNITS 3 AND 4: Mathematical Methods CAS


Areas of study

Mathematical Methods Units 3 and 4 consists of the following areas of study: ‘Functions and Graphs’, ‘Calculus’, ‘Algebra’ and ‘Probability’ which must be covered in a progression from Unit 3 to Unit 4, with an appropriate selection of content for each of Unit 3 and Unit 4. Mathematical Methods 3 & 4 assumes knowledge of the Mathematical Methods 1 & 2 areas of study. Students must have their own Casio ClassPad CAS calculator. The exam panel write exam papers with the assumption that students have a CAS calculator thus students without will be severely disadvantaged during exam time.


Outcomes

On completion of each unit the student should be able to:

1. define and explain key concepts as specified in the content from the ‘areas of study, and apply a range of related mathematical routines and procedures;

2. apply mathematical processes in non-routine contexts, and to analyse and discuss these applications of mathematics;

3. select and appropriately use a Computer Algebra System and other technology to develop mathematical ideas, produce results and carry out analysis in situations requiring problem-solving, modelling or investigative techniques or approaches.
Assessment tasks

The student’s level of achievement for Units 3 and 4 will be determined by school-assessed coursework and two end-of-year examinations.


Contribution to final assessment

School-assessed coursework for Unit 3 will contribute 20 per cent and for Unit 4 will contribute 14 per cent to the final assessment. Units 3 and 4 will also be assessed by two end-of-year examinations, which will contribute 66 per cent.


School Assessed Coursework – Unit 3

Outcomes 1, 2 and 3 will be assessed by:

 A function and calculus application task with several components of increasing complexity, worth 40 marks

 Two tests designed to cover material from each area of study in relation to Outcome 1 and corresponding aspects of Outcome 3, worth 20 marks. Total 60 marks



School Assessed Coursework – Unit 4

Outcomes 1, 2 and 3 will be assessed by:


 Two analysis tasks, each worth 20 marks. Both tasks are a short item of 2-4 hours duration over 1-2 days selected from:

 an assignment where students have the opportunity to work on a broader range of problems; or

 a short and focused investigation, challenging problem or modelling task; or

 a set of application questions requiring extended response analysis in relation to a particular topic or topics; or

 item response analysis for a collection of multiple-choice questions.
The second task is to be related to the Probability area of study.
End of year examinations
Examination 1 (1 hour) Short answer and some extended questions. NO calculators or notes are allowed. A formula sheet will be provided.
Examination 2 (2 hours) Multiple choice and extended questions. One bound reference, one scientific and one CAS calculator may be taken into the exam.

UNITS 3 AND 4: Specialist Mathematics


Students who select this subject must also be studying, or have previously studied, Mathematics Methods (CAS) Units 3 and 4. It is essential that students enjoy learning mathematics and they must have demonstrated good basic skills in both Mathematics Methods Units 1 and 2, and Specialist Mathematics Units 1 and 2.
Areas of study

Co-ordinate Geometry, Circular (Trigonometric) Functions, Algebra, Calculus, Vectors in Two and Three Dimensions and Mechanics.


Students will require an approved CAS Calculator and will be disadvantaged without one.
Outcomes

On completion of this unit the student should be able to:

1. define and explain key terms and concepts in the areas studied and to apply a range of related mathematical routines and procedures;

2. apply mathematical processes with an emphasis on general cases, in non-routine contexts, and to analyse and discuss these applications of mathematics;

3. select and appropriately use technology to develop mathematical ideas, produce results and carry out analysis in situations requiring problem-solving, modelling or investigative techniques or approaches.
Assessment tasks

School Assessed Coursework

Unit 3 and 4 will contribute 34 per cent to the final assessment.

(Total of 100 marks allocated across units 3 and 4).
Unit 3: Two analysis tasks, each worth 20 marks and taking 2-4 hours work over 1-2 days. Selected from:
 an assignment

 a short focused investigation or challenging problem

 a set of application questions requiring extended response analysis

 an item response analysis for a collection of multiple choice questions.


Unit 4: A problem solving or modelling application task with an emphasis on Outcomes 2 and 3, worth 40 marks.
Two tests designed to cover material from each area of study in relation to Outcome 1 and related to aspects of Outcome 3, worth 20 marks together.
End of Year Examinations
Examination 1 (1 hour)

Short answer and some extended questions. No calculators or notes are allowed. A formula sheet will be provided.


Examination 2 (2 hours)

Multiple-choice and extended-answer questions. One bound reference, one scientific and one CAS calculator may be taken into the exam.



UNITS 3 AND 4: Algorithmics


Algorithmics is a new study for 2015. The following information has not been formally ratified by VCAA and is subject to minor changes. Melbourne University and Monash University will both give this subject some credit towards a first year computing degree.
Algorithmics is a highly structured and theoretically well-founded framework for solving authentic, practical problems with computational methods. Algorithmics is fundamental to computer sciences and software engineering, and is essential for understanding the technical underpinnings of the information society. This subject examines how information about the world can be systematically represented and processed and how such a process can be sufficiently explicit and precise that it can be represented in a computer program. The focus is not on coding but on “algorithmic thinking”. Mathematical techniques are used to establish crucial properties of algorithms. Algorithms also covers deeper topics in computer sciences such as the possibility of artificial intelligence and prospects for new models of computation inspired by physical and biological systems.
Prerequisites

Students must have completed or are presently completing Mathematical Methods Units 1 and 2.

Rationale

Computing is central to our society and economy, and drives innovation in health, entertainment, science and business. Computation has fundamentally transformed the way we conduct science and engineering: simulation, virtual experiments, computational analysis and prediction have become indispensable parts of the contemporary scientific method. Computation enables us to make sense of data, whether it concerns the environment, the economy, health, entertainment, social and organizational structures or any other sphere of human experience or endeavor.






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