incorporating the Year Eleven and Twelve programs) Principal



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Outcome 1


On completion of this unit the student should be able to respond to a range of texts and reflect on influences shaping these responses. To achieve this outcome the student will draw on key knowledge and key skills outlined in Area of Study 1.

Key knowledge


  • the ways the conventions, techniques, language patterns, style and diction of texts can guide readers to meaning in print and non-print texts

  • the significance of characters and settings and events featured in the texts in shaping reader response

  • the structures and linguistic and literary features of particular forms of text

  • the ways others’ views on texts may:

    • influence or enhance a reading of a text

    • reveal assumptions and ideas about aspects of culture and society.

Key skills


  • develop critical responses by examining the patterns of language and imagery used in the text

  • discuss how the features and conventions of the text contribute to meaning

  • understand how their own ideas and contexts influence their readings of texts

  • explore, interpret and reflect on different ideas and values represented in literature

  • apply understanding of literary criticism to their reading of text/s

  • use evidence from the texts to support a response.

VCE Literature Units 1 and 2: 2016–2020; Units 3 and 4: 2017–2020



Area of Study 2

Ideas and concerns in texts


In this area of study students investigate the ideas and concerns raised in texts and the ways social and cultural contexts are represented. They consider how texts may reflect or comment on the interests of individuals and particular groups in society and how texts may support or question particular aspects of society. Students learn to select and discuss aspects of the texts that facilitate their interpretation and understanding of the point of view being presented. They consider those facets of human experience that are seen as important within the texts and those that are ignored or disputed. They examine the ways texts explore different aspects of the human condition.

Outcome 2


On completion of this unit the student should be able to analyse the ways in which a selected text reflects or comments on the ideas and concerns of individuals and particular groups in society. To achieve this outcome the student will draw on key knowledge and key skills outlined in Area of Study 2.

Key knowledge


  • the ways in which characters and situations reflect or reveal human experiences and social values

  • the features of society and the ideas and behaviour that texts appear to support or question

  • features of texts, for example language, characterisation and the presentation of settings, and how they contribute to meaning

  • the features appropriate for analytical responses including structure, conventions and language.

Key skills


  • analyse ways in which human experience is represented in texts including through selection of literary features, inclusion and exclusion, foregrounding and silencing

  • reflect upon the ideas and concerns raised by texts

  • analyse the views and values suggested by a text’s inclusions and exclusions

  • identify and comment on some of the techniques used in texts, showing how these contribute to meaning

  • develop analytical responses to texts.
 
UNIT 2: Context and connections



Ideas and concerns in texts


In this area of study students investigate the ideas and concerns raised in texts and the ways social and cultural contexts are represented. They consider how texts may reflect or comment on the interests of individuals and particular groups in society and how texts may support or question particular aspects of society. Students learn to select and discuss aspects of the texts that facilitate their interpretation and understanding of the point of view being presented. They consider those facets of human experience that are seen as important within the texts and those that are ignored or disputed. They examine the ways texts explore different aspects of the human condition.

Outcome 2


On completion of this unit the student should be able to analyse the ways in which a selected text reflects or comments on the ideas and concerns of individuals and particular groups in society. To achieve this outcome the student will draw on key knowledge and key skills outlined in Area of Study 2.

Key knowledge


  • the ways in which characters and situations reflect or reveal human experiences and social values

  • the features of society and the ideas and behaviour that texts appear to support or question

  • features of texts, for example language, characterisation and the presentation of settings, and how they contribute to meaning

  • the features appropriate for analytical responses including structure, conventions and language.

Key skills


  • analyse ways in which human experience is represented in texts including through selection of literary features, inclusion and exclusion, foregrounding and silencing

  • reflect upon the ideas and concerns raised by texts

  • analyse the views and values suggested by a text’s inclusions and exclusions

  • identify and comment on some of the techniques used in texts, showing how these contribute to meaning

  • develop analytical responses to texts.

Unit 3: Form and transformation

In this unit students consider how the form of a text affects meaning, and how writers construct their texts. They investigate ways writers adapt and transform texts and how meaning is affected as texts are adapted and transformed. They consider how the perspectives of those adapting texts may inform or influence the adaptations. Students draw on their study of adaptations and transformations to develop creative responses to texts.
Students develop their skills in communicating ideas in both written and oral forms.
Area of Study 1

Adaptations and transformations


In this area of study students focus on how the form of text contributes to the meaning of the text. Students develop an understanding of the typical features of a particular form of text and how the conventions associated with it are used, such as the use of imagery and rhythm in a poem or the use of setting, plot and narrative voice in a novel. Students use this understanding to reflect upon the extent to which changing the form of the text affects its meaning.
By exploring adaptations, students also consider how creators of adaptations may emphasise or understate perspectives, assumptions and ideas in their presentation of a text.

Outcome 1


On completion of this unit the student should be able to analyse the extent to which meaning changes when a text is adapted to a different form.
To achieve this outcome the student will draw on key knowledge and key skills outlined in Area of Study 1.

Key knowledge


  • the ways the form and conventions of a text affect the making of meaning

  • differences in meaning that may be created when a text is adapted or transformed

  • the ways creators of adaptations may present assumptions and ideas about aspects of culture and society that reflect or are different from the original text

  • the ways that perspectives of the creators may inform or influence adaptations of texts.

Key skills


  • analyse the construction of texts in terms of characterisation, tone, style, structure and point of view

  • identify typical features of a range of forms of text, and evaluate their significance in the making of meaning

  • identify and analyse the similarities and differences between the original and the adapted or transformed text.

Area of Study 2



Creative responses to texts


In this area of study students focus on the imaginative techniques used for creating and recreating a literary work. Students use their knowledge of how the meaning of texts can change as form changes to construct their own creative transformations of texts. They learn how writers develop images of people and places, and they develop an understanding of language, voice, form and structure. Students draw inferences from the original text and speculate about the writer’s purpose. In their adaptation of the tone and the style of the original text, students develop an understanding of the concerns and attitudes explored.
Students develop an understanding of the various ways in which authors craft texts. They reflect critically upon their own responses as they relate to the text, and discuss the purpose and context of their creations.

Outcome 2


On completion of this unit the student should be able to respond creatively to a text and comment on the connections between the text and the response.
To achieve this outcome the student will draw on key knowledge and key skills outlined in Area of Study 2.

Key knowledge


  • the point of view, context and form of the original text

  • the ways the central ideas of the original text are represented

  • the features of the original text including ideas, images, characters and situations, and the language in which these are expressed

  • techniques used to create, recreate or adapt a text and how they represent particular concerns or attitudes.

Key skills


  • identify elements of construction, context, point of view and form particular to the text, and apply understanding of these in a creative response

  • choose stylistically appropriate features including characterisation, setting, narrative, tone and style

  • critically reflect on how language choices and literary features from the original text are used in the adaptation.


Unit 4: Interpreting texts

In this unit students develop critical and analytic responses to texts. They consider the context of their responses to texts as well as the ideas explored in the texts, the style of the language and points of view. They investigate literary criticism informing both the reading and writing of texts. Students develop an informed and sustained interpretation supported by close textual analysis. For the purposes of this unit, literary criticism is characterised by extended, informed and substantiated views on texts and may include reviews, peer-reviewed articles and transcripts of speeches. Specifically, for Unit 4 Outcome 1, the literary criticism selected must reflect different perspectives, assumptions and ideas about the views and values of the text/s studied.


Area of Study 1

Literary perspectives


In this area of study students focus on how different readings of texts may reflect the views and values of both writer and reader. Students consider the ways in which various interpretations of texts can contribute to understanding. They compare and analyse two pieces of literary criticism reflecting different perspectives, assumptions and ideas about the views and values of the text studied. Students identify the issues, ideas and contexts writers choose to explore, the way these are represented in the text/s and the cultural, social, historical and ideological contexts in which they were created. Students enquire into the ways readers may arrive at differing interpretations about a text and the grounds on which they are developed. Through close attention to two pieces of literary criticism reflecting different perspectives, students develop their own response to a text.

Outcome 1


On completion of this unit students should be able to produce an interpretation of a text using different literary perspectives to inform their view.
To achieve this outcome the student will draw on key knowledge and key skills outlined in Area of Study 1.

Key knowledge


  • the ways that literary criticism presents assumptions and ideas about aspects of culture and society and how these inform readings of the text

  • contexts (cultural, social, historical and ideological) that may influence the construction and reading of the text

  • the ways in which the text may reflect or question aspects of human behaviour through characterisation, imagery, style, point of view and structure

  • the ways that contemporary views and values influence interpretations.

Key skills


  • identify and analyse the views and values in texts

  • explain how a literary criticism foregrounds particular views and questions texts in particular ways

  • analyse how literary criticism informs readings of texts

  • compare, analyse and evaluate different perspectives of texts presented in literary criticism.

Area of Study 2





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