incorporating the Year Eleven and Twelve programs) Principal


UNIT 3: THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION (1763-1789)



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UNIT 3: THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION (1763-1789)

By the 1750s, the British-American colonies had developed into prosperous, self-governing, loyal colonies of the British Empire. However, the conclusion of the French & Indian War brought about an end to the British policy of ‘Salutory Neglect’. Trying to recoup the massive debts incurred by the colonies, the 1760s saw Parliament introduce a series of revenue raising restrictions upon the colonists. Patriots violently defended this perceived attack on their Liberty with riots and protests, the barbaric tarring and feathering of British officials and their most famous act of defiance, the Boston Tea Party. With tensions rising and the outset of the Revolutionary War, in 1776 the Declaration of Independence proclaimed the rights of “Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness”. However, the Founding Fathers had to overcome the world’s greatest military power and appease the counter-revolutionaries internally before creating history’s most enduring Republic.


Areas of study

1. Revolutionary ideas, leaders, movements and events.

2. Creating a New Society
Outcomes


  1. Evaluate the role of ideas, leaders, movements and events in the development of the revolution.

  2. Analyse the challenges facing the emerging new order, and the way in which attempts were made to create a new society, and evaluate the nature of the society created by the revolution.

Assessment tasks

School assessed coursework (25% of final assessment)


  1. Research Report.

  2. Historiographical Exercise



UNIT 4: THE FRENCH REVOLUTION (1781-1795)

The old regime of France was based upon a society built on privilege and the absolute power of the King. By the 1780s, the inequality of this social order had been questioned by enlightened thinkers and ridiculed by crude depictions of the decadent lifestyle of Versailles. An ongoing financial crisis focused attention on the forms of inequality entrenched within society, which in turn led to demands for some form of representative government. The dramatic events of 1789 – The Tennis Court Oath and Storming of the Bastille – did not seek to remove the King, but to make him accept a representative Parliament. Yet, by 1792, France was at war with the rest of Europe and internally with its own people. A new invention called the Guillotine would be introduced and some 30,000 French citizens would be executed in the Terror – including the King, his wife Marie-Antoinette and many of the original revolutionaries of 1789.


Areas of study

1. Revolutionary ideas, leaders, movements and events.

2. Creating a new society.
Outcomes

1. Evaluate the role of ideas, leaders, movements and events in the development of the revolution.

2. Analyse the challenges facing the emerging new order, and the way in which attempts were made to create a new society, and evaluate the nature of the society created by the revolution.
Assessment tasks

School assessed coursework (25 per cent of final assessment)

 analytical exercises

 essays
COMPUTING
RATIONALE

In this unit students focus on how data, information and networked digital systems can be used to meet a range of users’ current and future needs. In Area of Study 1 students collect primary data when investigating an issue, practice or event and create a digital solution that graphically presents the findings of the investigation. In Area of Study 2 students examine the technical underpinnings of wireless and mobile networks, and security controls to protect stored and transmitted data, to design a network solution that meets an identified need or opportunity. They predict the impact on users if the network solution were implemented. In Area of Study 3 students acquire and apply their knowledge of information architecture and user interfaces, together with web authoring skills, when creating a website to present different viewpoints on a contemporary issue. When creating solutions students need to apply relevant stages of the problem-solving methodology as well as computational, design and systems thinking skills.
UNIT 1: Computing

Areas of study

1. Data and graphic solutions

2. Networks

3. Collaboration and communication
Outcome 1

On completion of this unit the student should be able to acquire, secure and interpret data, and design and develop

a graphic solution that communicates the findings of an investigation.
Outcome 2

On completion of this unit the student should be able to design a network with wireless capability that meets an identified need or opportunity, explain its configuration and predict risks and benefits for intended users.


Outcome 3

On completion of this unit the student should be able to design and develop a website collaboratively with others that presents an analysis of a contemporary issue and the team’s point of view on the issue.


UNIT 2: Computing
In this unit students focus on data and how the application of computational, design and systems thinking skills support the creation of solutions that automate the processing of data. In Area of Study 1 students develop their computational thinking skills when using a programming or scripting language to create solutions. They engage in the design and development stages of the problem-solving methodology. In Area of Study 2 students develop a sound understanding of data and how a range of software tools can be used to extract data from large repositories and manipulate it to create visualisations that are clear, usable and attractive, and reduce the complexity of data. In Area of Study 3 students apply all stages of the problem-solving methodology to create a solution using database management software and explain how they are personally affected by their interactions with a database system.
Areas of study

  1. Programming

  2. Data Analysis and Visualisation

  3. Data management

Outcome 1

On completion of this unit the student should be able to design working modules in response to solution requirements, and use a programming or scripting language to develop the modules.

Outcome 2

On completion of this unit the student should be able to apply the problem-solving methodology and use appropriate software tools to extract relevant data and create a data visualisation that meets a specified user’s needs.

Outcome 3

On completion of this unit the student should be able to apply the problem-solving methodology to create a solution using database management software, and explain the personal benefits and risks of interacting with a database.

INFORMATICS


In Informatics Units 3 and 4 students focus on data, information and information systems. In Unit 3 students consider data and how it is acquired, managed, manipulated and interpreted to meet a range of needs. In Area of Study 1 students investigate the way organisations acquire data using interactive online solutions, such as websites and applications (apps), and consider how users interact with these solutions when conducting online transactions. They examine how relational database management systems (RDBMS) store and manipulate data typically acquired this way. Students use software to create user flow diagrams that depict how users interact with online solutions, and acquire and apply knowledge and skills in the use of an RDBMS to create a solution. Students develop an understanding of the power and risks of using complex data as a basis for decision making. In Area of Study 2 students complete the first part of a project. They frame a hypothesis and then select, acquire and organise data from multiple data sets to confirm or refute this hypothesis. This data is manipulated using tools such as spreadsheets or databases to help analyse and interpret it so that students can form a conclusion regarding their hypothesis. Students take an organised approach to problem solving by preparing project plans and monitoring the progress of the project. The second part of the project is completed in Unit 4.


UNIT 3: Informatics

RATIONALE

Unit 3 focuses on how individuals or organisations use ICT to solve information problems and to participate actively in a society where use of ICT is commonplace. Students acquire and apply knowledge and skills in solving information problems to assist in decision-making and in managing tasks and timelines. The solutions and information products should meet the specific needs of organisations such as sporting clubs, newsagencies, charities, or the needs of individuals. Students also explore how the capabilities of networked information systems support teams of workers or learners to solve problems and share knowledge
Areas of study


  1. Organisations and Data Management

  2. Data analytics: drawing conclusions.

Outcome 1



On completion of this unit the student should be able to design a solution, develop it using a relational database management system, and diagrammatically represent how users interact with an online solution when supplying data for a transaction.
Outcome 2

On completion of this unit the student should be able to use a range of appropriate techniques and processes to acquire, prepare, manipulate and interpret complex data to confirm or refute a hypothesis, and formulate a project plan to manage progress.
Assessment tasks

As this is a new course for next year, assessment information is unavailable at this stage.


UNIT 4: Informatics


RATIONALE

In this unit students focus on strategies and techniques for manipulating, managing and securing data and information to meet a range of needs. In Area of Study 1 students draw on the analysis and conclusion of their hypothesis determined in Unit 3, Outcome 2, and then design, develop and evaluate a multimodal, online solution that effectively communicates the conclusion and findings. The evaluation focuses on the effectiveness of the solution in communicating the conclusion and the reasonableness of the findings. Students use their project plan to monitor their progress and assess the effectiveness of their plan and adjustments in managing the project. In Area of Study 2, students explore how different organisations manage the storage and disposal of data and information to minimise threats to the integrity and security of data and information and to optimise the handling of information.


Areas of study

  1. Data Analytics: Presenting the findings

  2. Information Management

Outcome 1

On completion of this unit the student should be able to design, develop and evaluate a multimodal online solution that confirms or refutes a hypothesis, and assess the effectiveness of the project plan in managing progress.
Outcome 2

On completion of this unit the student should be able to compare and contrast the effectiveness of information management strategies used by two organisations to manage the storage and disposal of data and information, and recommend improvements to their current practices.

SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT

UNIT 3: Software Development

RATIONALE

In Software development Units 3 and 4 students focus on the application of a problem-solving methodology and underlying skills to create purpose-designed solutions using a programming language. In Unit 3 students develop a detailed understanding of the analysis, design and development stages of the problem-solving methodology and use a programming language to create working software modules.
In Area of Study 1 students respond to given software designs and develop a set of working modules through the use of a programming language. Students examine a range of software design representations and interpret these when applying specific functions of a programming language to create working modules. In Area of Study 2 students analyse a need or opportunity, plan and design a solution and develop computational, design and systems thinking skills. This forms the first part of a project that is completed in Unit 4.
Areas of study


  1. Programming practice

  2. Analysis and Design

Outcome 1

On completion of this unit the student should be able to interpret designs and apply a range of functions and techniques using a programming language to develop working modules.
Outcome 2

On completion of this unit the student should be able to analyse and document a need or opportunity, generate alternative design ideas, represent the preferred solution design and formulate a project plan for creating the solution.


Assessment tasks

As this is a new course for next year, assessment information is unavailable at this stage.

UNIT 4: Software Development
RATIONALE

In this unit students focus on how the information needs of individuals and organisations are met through the creation of software solutions used in a networked environment. They continue to study the programming language used in Unit 3. In Area of Study 1 students further their computational thinking skills by transforming their detailed design prepared in Unit 3 into a software solution. They evaluate the efficiency and effectiveness of the solution in meeting needs or opportunities. They also assess the effectiveness of the project plan in monitoring project progress. In Area of Study 2 students apply systems thinking skills when explaining the relationship between two information systems that share data and how that dependency affects the performance of the systems.


Areas of study

  1. Software Solutions

  2. Interactions and impact

Outcome 1

On completion of this unit the student should be able to apply stages of the problem-solving methodology to create a solution using a programming language that fulfils identified requirements and assess the effectiveness of the project plan in monitoring progress.
Outcome 2

On completion of this unit the student should be able to analyse and explain the dependencies between two information systems and evaluate the controls in place in one information system to protect the integrity of its source data.

LEGAL STUDIES
RATIONALE

This study is about the way the law relates to and serves both individuals and the community. It focuses on developing an understanding of the way in which law is generated, structured and operates in Australia.



UNIT 1: Criminal Law in Action


Areas of study

1. Law in society

2. Criminal law

3. The criminal courtroom


Outcomes

On completion of this unit the student should be able to:



  1. Explain the need for effective laws and describe the main sources and types of laws in society;

  2. Explain the key principles and types of criminal law, apply the key principles to relevant cases, and discuss the impact of criminal activity on the individual and society;

  3. Describe the process for the resolution of criminal cases, and discuss the capacity of these processes to achieve justice.

Learning opportunities are explored through case studies, mock trials and visits to both the Melbourne Courts and local prisons.

UNIT 2: Issues in Civil Law


Areas of study

1. Civil law

2. The civil law in action

3. The law in focus

4. A question of rights
Outcomes

On completion of this unit the student should be able to:



  1. Explain the principles of civil law, law-making by courts, and elements of torts, and apply these to relevant cases;

  2. Explain and evaluate the processes for the resolution of civil disputes;

  3. Explain one or more area/s of civil law, and discuss the legal system’s capacity to respond to issues and disputes related to the selected area/s of law;

  4. Describe an Australian case illustrating rights issues, and discuss the impact of the case on the legal system and the rights of individuals.

Learning opportunities are explored through case studies, mock trials and visits to both the Melbourne Courts and local prisons.

UNIT 3: Law-making




Areas of study

1. Parliament and the citizen

2. The constitution and the protection of rights

3. Role of the courts in law-making
Outcomes

On completion of this unit the student should be able to:



  1. Explain the structure and role of parliament, including its processes and effectiveness as a law-making body, describe why legal change is needed, and the means by which such change can be influenced;

  2. Explain the role of the Commonwealth Constitution in defining law-making powers within a federal structure, analyse the means by which law-making powers may change, and evaluate the effectiveness of the Commonwealth Constitution in protecting human rights;

  3. Describe the role and operation of the courts in law-making, evaluate their effectiveness and law-making bodies and discuss their relationship with parliament.

Assessment tasks



Assessment of levels of achievement

The student’s level of achievement in Unit 3 will be determined by school-assessed coursework and an end-of-year examination.


Contributions to final assessment

School-assessed coursework for Unit 3 will contribute 25 per cent to the final assessment. The level of achievement for Units 3 and 4 is also assessed by an end-of-year examination, which will contribute 50 per cent to the final assessment.

UNIT 4: Resolution and Justice
Areas of study

1. Dispute resolution

2. Court processes and procedures, and engaging in justice
Outcomes

On completion of this unit the student should be able to:



  1. Describe and evaluate the effectiveness of institutions and methods for the determination of criminal cases and the resolution of civil disputes;

  2. Explain the processes and procedures for the resolution of criminal cases and civil disputes, and evaluate their operation and application, and evaluate the effectiveness of the legal system.

Assessment tasks



Assessment of levels of achievement

The student’s level of achievement in Unit 4 will be determined by school-assessed coursework and an end-of-year examination.


Contributions to final assessment

School-assessed coursework for Unit 4 will contribute 25 per cent to the final assessment. The level of achievement for Units 3 and 4 is also assessed by an end-of-year examination, which will contribute 50 per cent to the final assessment.



LITERATURE


RATIONALE

The study of literature focuses on the enjoyment and appreciation of reading that arises from discussion, debate and the challenge of exploring the meanings of literary texts. Students reflect on their interpretations and those of others.


AIMS

The study is based on the premise that meaning is derived from the relationship between the text, the context in which it was produced and the experience of life and literature the reader brings to the texts. Accordingly, the study encompasses texts that vary in form and range from past to contemporary social and cultural contexts. The study of literature encourages independent and critical thinking in students’ analytical and creative responses to texts, which will assist students in the workforce and in future academic study.

There are no prerequisites for entry to Units 1, 2 and 3. Students must undertake Unit 3 prior to undertaking Unit 4.


UNIT 1: Approaches to Literature

In this unit, students focus on the ways in which the interaction between text and reader creates meaning. Students’ analyses of the features and conventions of texts help them develop increasingly discriminating responses to a range of literary forms and styles. Students respond critically, creatively and reflectively to the ideas and concerns of texts and gain insights into how texts function as representations of human experience. They develop familiarity with key terms, concepts and practices that equip them for further studies in literature. They develop an awareness of how the views and values that readers hold may influence the reading of a text. 


Area of Study 1
Reading practices

In this area of study students consider how language, structure and stylistic choices are used in different literary forms and types of text. They consider both print and non-print texts, reflecting on the contribution of form and style to meaning. Students reflect on the degree to which points of view, experiences and contexts shape responses to text. They engage with other views about texts and develop an awareness of how these views may influence and enhance their own reading of a text. They develop an awareness of initial readings of texts against more considered and complex response to texts.


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