Imagine you are a witness to a situation you perceive as being unjust



Download 17.87 Kb.
Date30.04.2018
Size17.87 Kb.
#42889

Imagine you are a witness to a situation you perceive as being unjust.

  • Imagine you are a witness to a situation you perceive as being unjust.
    • What is your response?
    • Do you speak out or remain silent?
  • Essential Question:
    • How can artistic expression advance social commentary?

Unpack Our Next Project!

  • Your assignment is to work with a group to write and perform an original dramatic script in which you make a statement about a conflict that faces society. By doing so, you should be able to demonstrate your understanding of how Arthur Miller spoke out about a contemporary issue while setting his drama in a time period with corresponding events.
  • Page 92

P 94

  • P 94
  • P 95
  • P 96-97
  • P 97-98 (chunk 1)
  • P 98-99 (chunk 2)
  • P 99-100 (chunk 3)
  • Use the first line of the chart on page 93 to take notes on your section
  • Both partners need to write down the notes

Two groups

  • Two groups
  • Share your notes about your selection
  • Record evidence in the rest of the chart on page 93
  • You get one point per box filled (correctly)

Exit Slip: Writing Journal Prompt

  • Exit Slip: Writing Journal Prompt

Go to e3healy.weebly.com

  • Go to e3healy.weebly.com
  • American Lit Quarter 2
  • Research your assigned subject
  • Use the note template
  • Be prepared to present Monday!
  • Writing Journal Prompt:
  • What does the Witch hunt in Puritan times have to do with McCarthyism during the Cold War?
  • Contemporary Societal Concern
  • Parallel Setting
  • Example A: McCarthy trials
  • Political Manipulation and Hysteria
  • Salem Witch Trials
  • Example B:
  • Example C:
  • Your Own Idea:

4 > group > 2

  • 4 > group > 2
  • Must be willing to work together for the ENTIRE unit
  • Pick people you know will do their fair share

Share your Contemporary Conflicts

  • Share your Contemporary Conflicts
  • Pick the Contemporary Conflict you think you could best run with for an ENTIRE unit
  • Pick the Parallel Setting you could best run with for an ENTIRE unit
  • Now is your chance to switch groups if you don’t like the topic.

What are the elements of your time period?

  • What are the elements of your time period?

Read the definition of a Crucible, and then decide how might it fit with a Witch Hunt.

  • Read the definition of a Crucible, and then decide how might it fit with a Witch Hunt.

You each will receive a character card, with numbered lines

  • You each will receive a character card, with numbered lines
    • You will read the first line in order of the circle.
    • You will read the second line when your turn comes back around.
    • You will read the third line when your last turn comes around.
  • What seems to be happening in this Act?

Turn to page 103

  • Turn to page 103
  • When it is your turn, read your character’s name, and your three lines.
  • Take notes on your classmate’s characters as they read.
    • What motivations are revealed?
    • Make an inference about their character
    • Predict what they might do in the play

Read Miller’s Preface to the Play

  • Read Miller’s Preface to the Play

Read Act 1 to page 20 (or when Proctor enters the scene)

  • Read Act 1 to page 20 (or when Proctor enters the scene)
  • What are some
  • Historically Accurate
  • elements?

Continue Research into your time period

  • Continue Research into your time period
  • How can you ensure “Historical Accuracy”?
  • What types of characters would feature in your time period?
  • Foil:  
  • a foil is a character that shows qualities that are in contrast with the qualities of another character with the objective to highlight the traits of the other character.
  • Can you think of any Examples?

We will focus on Hale, Proctor, & Corey as Foils

  • We will focus on Hale, Proctor, & Corey as Foils
  • As you read, place an annotated sticky note in the text where you believe their characters are being developed
  • Proctor: pg 20
  • Farmer, Not easily led,
  • People feel foolish around him, Sinner,
  • feels like a hypocrite,
  • seems confident
  • Hale
  • Proctor
  • Corey

Who would be foils in your play?

  • Who would be foils in your play?

What conflicts have you noticed so far?

  • What conflicts have you noticed so far?
  • Character
  • Versus
  • Character
  • Reasons
  • Girls
  • Vs.
  • Adults
  • They have been dabbling in Voodoo & they don’t want to be caught. They are sick of being mistreated.
  • Proctor
  • Vs.
  • Abigail

What types of Conflicts will we see in your play?

  • What types of Conflicts will we see in your play?
  • Subtext:
  • Subtext is the unspoken thoughts and motives of your characters - what they really think and believe.
  • Line
  • Gesture
  • Movement
  • Facial Expressions
  • Vocal Delivery
  • PROCTOR, gently pressing her from him, with great sympathy but firmly: Child--
  • Obvious gentleness in his hands as he holds her at length;
  • Holding her in a long lingering fashion before pushing her gently from him
  • Speaking to her as a father, tenderly, as if trying to win her over
  • Abby, I may think of you softly from…
  • Aye, but we did not.

Each person in your group takes a line, and fills in the chart on the top of page 107.

  • Each person in your group takes a line, and fills in the chart on the top of page 107.
  • Now, try it for “Proctor is Afraid of Abigail” on the same page
  • Finally, try “Proctor is Conflicted in His Feelings for Abigail” on page 108.

Each group takes a subtext & we will guess!

  • Each group takes a subtext & we will guess!
  • ​Read "The Very Proper Gander" in Springboard, pg. 112
  • How does a Rumor Cause Hysteria?

How does Hysteria move the events in The Crucible?

  • How does Hysteria move the events in The Crucible?
  • Add in your own Rumor to Hysteria scenario to begin your play. 
  • Look up the meaning of the words on page 115 in your Springboard book
  • Metaphor
  • Proctor: “a funeral marches round your heart”
  • Elizabeth: “the magistrate sits in your heart”
  • Work in your groups to determine the meaning and characterization present in the rest of the metaphors
  • Pg 116

Research the language of your time period

  • Research the language of your time period
    • Find words you will use to convey a Historically Accurate setting
    • Develop a couple metaphors that are typical of that time period.
  • Homework: Read  ACT 2 in The Crucible, and complete the interpretation of Proctor and Elizabeth's exchange using Springboard pp. 119-120
  • Work with your group for ten minutes and decide how you will present one interpretation of your homework scene.

We will focus on evidence used to find someone guilty of witchcraft. What do you remember so far?

  • We will focus on evidence used to find someone guilty of witchcraft. What do you remember so far?
  • As you read, place an annotated sticky note in the text where you believe evidence is present:
  • Act 1:
  • Hysterical confessions and accusations
  • Page 52

Write a courtroom style scene based in your time period, or using one of the scenarios on page 123.

  • Write a courtroom style scene based in your time period, or using one of the scenarios on page 123.
  • Be prepared to perform it!

Find a definition of these three types of Irony:

  • Find a definition of these three types of Irony:
  • Dramatic Irony
  • Situational Irony
  • Verbal Irony
  • Let’s find examples in Monty Python’s Holy Grail!

ACT III

  • Proctor
  • Elizabeth
  • Secret he/she has
  • Quote that shows that choice
  • Reason for making that choice
  • Quote that shows that reason
  • How do you feel about the character now?
  • How will this affect other characters?
  • How does this relate to bigger ideas within the text?
  • Chart on pages 124-125 in Springboard
  • Where is the Irony?
  • Is there any way to add irony to your play?

As we read the end of the play, review the foils. How do they ultimately work together?

  • As we read the end of the play, review the foils. How do they ultimately work together?
  • Proctor: pg 20
  • Farmer, Not easily led,
  • People feel foolish around him, Sinner,
  • feels like a hypocrite,
  • seems confident

To reveal character relationships

  • To reveal character relationships
    • Springboard p. 137, Act 2, Scene 3
  • To move the action forward
    • Springboard p. 137-138, Act 3
  • To reveal a character’s private thoughts and emotions (called monologue)
    • Springboard p. 138, Mary’s monologue
  • Time to Write Your Own
  • You must have all three types

Using the chart on Springboard, p 140, compare different versions of the same play

  • Using the chart on Springboard, p 140, compare different versions of the same play
  • How will you end your play?

Choose one of the prompts on Springboard page 141 to answer in a response essay

  • Choose one of the prompts on Springboard page 141 to answer in a response essay
  • You may use your notes and the play to help you write your essay
  • Introduction
    • Hook
    • TAG summary
    • Thesis
  • Claim 1
    • Topic Sentence
    • Evidence
    • Explanation
  • Claim 2
  • Claim 3
  • Thesis Conclusion
    • Thesis
    • Connection to Universal ideas
  • Let’s Score It!
  • Check out the Rubric on Page 145—What will it take to get all 4s?
  • Finish your scripts, Type them,
  • Turn them in to Turnitin.com
  • Sign Up!
  • Have you planned your costume?
  • Your Stage Props?
  • Have you Practiced?
  • Be sure to grab a scoring sheet


Download 17.87 Kb.

Share with your friends:




The database is protected by copyright ©sckool.org 2022
send message

    Main page