Identify the prepositions in the following sentences



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Identify the prepositions in the following sentences.

  • The cat climbed up the tree.
  • The girl from Mexico didn’t speak English.
  • I put my socks in the drawer of the dresser.
  • Ken looked up the answer to the question.
  • Once upon a time there was an enchanted forest.
  • After the movie we ate dinner at my favorite restaurant.
  • Students should always make up their work when they are absent from school.

Conjunction

  • FOR
  • AND
  • NOR
  • BUT
  • OR
  • YET
  • SO
  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RPoBE-E8VOc
  • Phrase- a group of words that somehow relate to each other
  • Clause- a group of words containing a subject and verb. Clause may also express complete thoughts.

What is a Conjunction?

  • You can use a conjunction to link words, phrases, and clauses, as in the following examples:
    • I ate the pizza and the pasta.
    • Call the movers when you are ready.

Types of Conjunctions

  • There are three kinds of conjunctions:
    • Coordinating conjunctions
    • Subordinating conjunctions
    • Correlative conjunctions

1. Co-ordinating Conjunctions

  • You use a co-ordinating conjunction ("and," "but," "or," "nor," "for," "so," or "yet") to join individual words, phrases, and independent clauses.
  • *Note that you can also use the conjunctions "but" and "for" as prepositions.

In the following sentences, each of the red highlighted words is a co-ordinating conjunction:

  • Lilacs and violets are usually purple.
  • In this example, the co-ordinating conjunction "and" links two nouns.

This movie is particularly interesting to feminist film theorists, for the screenplay was written by Mae West.

  • This movie is particularly interesting to feminist film theorists, for the screenplay was written by Mae West.
  • In this example, the co-ordinating conjunction "for" is used to link two independent clauses

Daniel's uncle claimed that he spent most of his youth dancing on rooftops and swallowing goldfish.

  • Daniel's uncle claimed that he spent most of his youth dancing on rooftops and swallowing goldfish.
  • Here the co-ordinating conjunction "and" links two participle phrases ("dancing on rooftops" and "swallowing goldfish“).

2. Subordinating Conjunctions

  • A subordinating conjunction introduces a dependent clause.
  • The most common subordinating conjunctions are "after," "although," "as," "because," "before," "how," "if," "once," "since," "than," "that," "though," "till," "until," "when," "where," "whether," and "while."

After she had learned to drive, Alice felt more independent.

  • After she had learned to drive, Alice felt more independent.
  • The subordinating conjunction "after" introduces the dependent clause "After she had learned to drive."

If the paperwork arrives on time, your check will be mailed on Tuesday.

  • If the paperwork arrives on time, your check will be mailed on Tuesday.
  • Similarly, the subordinating conjunction “if " introduces the dependent clause "If the paperwork arrives on time."

Gerald had to begin his essay over again when his computer crashed.

  • Gerald had to begin his essay over again when his computer crashed.
  • The subordinating conjunction "when" introduces the dependent clause "when his computer crashed."

Correlative Conjunctions

  • Correlative conjunctions always appear in pairs -- Use them to link equivalent sentence elements.
  • The most common correlative conjunctions are "both...and," "either...or," "neither...nor,", "not only...but also," "so...as," and "whether...or."

Both my grandfather and my father worked in the steel plant.

  • Both my grandfather and my father worked in the steel plant.
  • In this sentence, the correlative conjunction "both...and" is used to link the two noun phrases that act as the compound subject of the sentence: "my grandfather" and "my father".

Corinne is trying to decide whether to go to medical school or to go to law school.

  • Corinne is trying to decide whether to go to medical school or to go to law school.
  • Similarly, the correlative conjunction "whether ... or" links the two infinitive verb phrases "to go to medical school" and "to go to law school."

The explosion destroyed not only the school but also the neighboring pub.

  • The explosion destroyed not only the school but also the neighboring pub.
  • In this example the correlative conjunction "not only ... but also" links the two noun phrases ("the school" and "neighbouring pub“)

Life without conjunctions:

  • Life without conjunctions:
  • I would love to go out to eat with you. I would love to go out to eat with Satie. I would love to go to the movies with you. I would love to go to the movies with Satie. My mom says I can’t. My mom says I might have to clean up my room. The reason is this: I broke my curfew last weekend.
  • Life with conjunctions:
  • I would love to go out to eat and to the movies with you and Satie, but my mom says I have to either do my homework or clean up my room because I broke my curfew last weekend.

Conjunction Practice

  • 1. Neither Tessa nor I have ever seen a professional dance show.
  • 2. Today I bought tickets to an Alvin Ailey production, so I am quite excited.
  • 3. Although I have never seen a professional dance company perform live, Marcela often attends dance productions with her mother.
  • 4. Alvin Ailey was born in Texas in 1931, but he eventually moved to New York.
  • 5. Not only as a dancer but also as the choreographer of the dance company, Ailey was very much admired.

Interjections *big name for a little word

  • Interjections do the following:
    • Express a feeling: wow, gee, oops, zowie, darn
    • Say yes or no: yes, no, yep, nope, uh-huh
    • Call attention: yo, hey, whoa
    • Indicate a pause: well, um, hmm, ah
    • *If an interjection expresses a really strong feeling, it can stand alone even though it’s not a complete sentence.
    • ex. Wow! That’s a gorgeous dress!
    • ex. Ouch! That hurts.

Interjections

  • An interjection is not grammatically related to the rest of the sentence.
  • What does that mean?
  • Unlike all of the other parts of speech, the interjection does not interact with any other words in the sentence.
  • It does not modify anything, and it does not get modified by anything. It does not play the role of subject or verb.

Interjection Practice

  • Oh no, I forgot that the exam was today.
  • I heard one Canadian say to another Canadian, “You have a new car, eh?”
  • Uh, I don’t know the answer to that question.
  • Ah, now I understand.
  • Hey! What a good idea!
  • Hi! What’s new?
  • Well, what did he say?


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