I. Background and Procedure II. Colonial Literature III. The Crucible



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Questions

  • What reasons were given for the creation of the document?
  • What did they agree to do?
  • What words in the document show the seriousness of the persons who signed it?
  • What was so important about the Mayflower Compact that it is still studied as part of our history? (first agreement to create self-government in America)
  • Did it help or hurt them?
  • Would the new colony have survived just as well without it?
  • Could the signing of the Mayflower Compact be considered an act that contributed to the "common good?" How?
  • What was the benefit in this historical situation of group cooperation?

Thursday

The United States of America began as a land of voyagers. Several hundred Native American tribes inhabited the United States long before the Puritans came here for religious freedom. The Native American literature was entirely oral, for these tribes had not yet created a writing system of their own.

  • The United States of America began as a land of voyagers. Several hundred Native American tribes inhabited the United States long before the Puritans came here for religious freedom. The Native American literature was entirely oral, for these tribes had not yet created a writing system of their own.
  • The New England Puritans also played a vital role in shaping American values. The 17th century Puritans contributed to our country's mission, work ethic, and its moral sensibility. Along with the Native Americans, the colonists helped to shape the beginning of our literary heritage.

Vocabulary

  • Puritan Plain: A way of writing that expresses simplicity and clarity of expression
  • Anachronism: Words that are no longer in general use
  • Allusion: A reference to someone or something that is known from history, literature, religion, sports, politics, science, or some other branch of culture
  • Inversion: A reversal of the normal word order in a sentence or phrase
  • Anaphora: The repetition of a word or words at the beginning of a line, clause, or sentence
  • Conceit: An elaborate, extended metaphor
  • Apostrophe: A figure of speech in which a speaker directly address a person who is not there or a personified object, quality, or idea

Journal: Read the Following

  • “So lamentable was our scarcity that we were constrained to eat dogs, cats, rats, snakes, toadstools, horsehides, and what not. One man out of the misery he endured, killing his wife, powdered her up to eat her, for which he was burned. Many besides fed on the corpses of dead men, and one who had gotten insatiable out of custom to that food could not be restrained until such time as he was executed for it.” The Starving Time
  • Respond
  • Obviously, it was very difficult to make it in the “new” world. Life was hard, food was scarce, and a lot of people died.
  • What made those that survived different? Was it just “luck” or survival of the fittest (Darwin). Would you have survived? Respond in a paragraph.

Journal: Response

  • Obviously, it was very difficult to make it in the “new” world. Life was hard, food was scarce, and a lot of people died.
  • What made those that survived different? Was it just “luck” or survival of the fittest (Darwin). Would you have survived? Respond in a paragraph.

Primary Sources: Group Work

  • Using the handout, answer the following questions in pairs.
  • 1. Identify the basic Puritan beliefs illustrated in these quotations.
  • 2. What do these quotations suggest about Puritan attitudes toward women and children?
  • 3. In what ways did the Puritans attempt to make religion a controlling force in everyday life?
  • 4. Based on these quotations, do you consider Puritanism a repressive and intolerant moral and religious code or as a rigorous and realistic attempt to face up to the harsh realities of life?

Basic Puritan Beliefs

  • Basic Puritan Beliefs
  • 1. Total Depravity - through Adam and Eve's fall, every person is born sinful - concept of Original Sin.
  • 2. Unconditional Election - God "saves" those he wishes - only a few are selected for salvation - concept of predestination.
  • 3. Limited Atonement - Jesus died for the chosen only, not for everyone.
  • 4. Irresistible Grace - God's grace is freely given, it cannot be earned or denied. Grace is defined as the saving and transfiguring power of God.
  • 5. Perseverance of the "saints" - those elected by God have full power to interpret the will of God, and to live uprightly. If anyone rejects grace after feeling its power in his life, he will be going against the will of God - something impossible in Puritanism.

Day 8

  • Social Contract
  • Puritan Poetry
  • Terms: conceit, anaphora, and apostrophe
  • Quiz on Friday on all literature from this week.

“Huswifery” (82) By: Edward Taylor

  • “Make me, O Lord, Thy spinning-wheel complete.
  • Thy holy word my distaff make for me.
  • Make mine affections Thy swift flyers neat
  • And make my soul Thy holy spool to be.
  • My conversation make to be Thy reel
  • And reel thy yarn thereon spun of Thy wheel.
  • Make me Thy loom
  • then, knit therein this twine:
  • And make Thy Holy Spirit, Lord, wind quills:
  • Then weave the web Thyself. Thy yarn is fine.
  • Thine ordinances make my fulling-mills.
  • Then dye the same in heavenly colors choice,
  • All pinked with varnished flowers of paradise.
  • Then clothe therewith mine understanding, will,
  • Affections, judgment, conscience, memory, My words and actions,
  • that their shine may fill My ways with glory and Thee glorify.
  • Then mine apparel shall display before Ye
  • That I am clothed in holy robes for glory.
  • As you read the poem, pay close attention to the use of conceit and apostrophe. How are these literary terms effectively used in the poem? What do you think the spinning wheel really represents? In addition to the spinning wheel, try to identify the metaphors for the following objects: loom, clothing, and apparel.


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