History 344: survey of california history, a multicultural perspective prof. Stuart graybill – office (rn 211) – information



Download 145 Kb.
Page1/3
Date18.01.2019
Size145 Kb.
#75702
  1   2   3
HISTORY 344: SURVEY OF CALIFORNIA HISTORY, A MULTICULTURAL PERSPECTIVE
PROF. STUART GRAYBILL – OFFICE (RN 211) – INFORMATION
MTWTh 9:15am-10:15am E-mail: graybis@scc.losrios.edu

Friday 2:30-4:00 pm Phone: (916) 558-2309

(or, by appointment) Website: web.scc.losrios.edu/graybis

COURSE OVERVIEW
This course will examine the historical development of California from the era of the first settlement by native peoples to the present, and it will emphasize the evolution of the state’s multicultural society. Lectures and readings and other class materials will introduce students to the origins and consequences of the major historical forces (economic, social, cultural and political) that helped shape life in California over the last several centuries.

REQUIRED READING MATERIALS

Course Textbook: California: An Interpretive History, James Rawls, Walton Bean

(The book above is available in the SCC College Store)



GRADED ASSIGNMENTS:
Students will be required to complete TWO MIDTERM EXAMS, a FINAL EXAM, and ONE DOCUMENTARY SOURCE PROBLEM (from a selection of two). The schedule for completing these assignments, and their relative value, as a percentage of course grade, is provided below:
First Midterm Exam: Thursday September 27 20%

Second Midterm Exam: Thursday November 8 20%

Formal Essay: Tuesday November 20 20%

Final Exam: Thursday, December 20 20%

Miscellaneous: 20%
* MIDTERM and FINAL EXAMINATIONS will examine students on course readings and in-class material (lectures, films, textbook, handouts, etc.). In examinations, students will write essays, short answers, identification exercises or a combination of these methods. Bring a green book to all exams!
* FORMAL ESSAY will require students to identify, analyze and interpret an issue, event, person/s, movement or force in California history from questions provided by the professor (approximately 5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 1" margins, with a cover page – more complete instructions for writing the essays follow later in this syllabus). Students must complete the formal essay to pass the class!
* The MISCELLANEOUS portion of students' grade is a composite of students' regular (or irregular) attendance, on-time (or untimely) arrival, participation in class activities, etc. Lack of attendance and late arrival to, or early departure from, class counts against students’ miscellaneous grade component. The easiest “A” in the class is to attend every class session and participate in all the class exercises.
POLICY REGARDING MISSED EXAMS:
-If an unforeseen emergency compels you to miss one of the exams, you may make up that exam at the end of this semester. However, you may make-up only ONE of the exams!
-Since there are two exams that students may make-up, I will not compose a make-up exam for each individual exam (that would be simply too much extra work for me). So, the make-up exam will be drawn from the material assigned for the first two exams (see the “Exam Preparation” section of the syllabus for more information).
-A SINGLE MAKE-UP DATE for a missed exam will be offered during the final exam, at the end of the summer session. If you miss the make-up exam, you will receive a zero (0) for that exam. Furthermore, if you wish to make-up a missed exam, you must inform the professor of your intent to do so well in advance of the make-up exam date.
POLICY REGARDING LATE PAPERS:
* Late papers will be PENALIZED ONE FULL LETTER GRADE.
* Late Papers must be submitted within ONE WEEK of the due date.
* NO PAPERS WILL BE ACCEPTED BEYOND ONE WEEK FOLLOWING THE DUE DATE!
*Therefore, in order to ensure you pass the course and maximize your chances for the best possible grade, complete the paper on time.

RECOMMENDED COURSES, SKILLS:
Completion of ENGWR 100 with a grade of "C" or better, or ESLW 320 and ESLR 320 with grades of "C" or better is STRONGLY ADVISED! The principal method of assessment in this course is through evaluation of written work. Therefore, to be successful in this course, proficiency in English composition is a strong asset.
STANDARDS FOR CLASSROOM COURTESY:
1) Students are not permitted to answer cell phones, text, or use other electronic devices in class! 2) Cell phones must be turned off or set to vibrate mode. 3) If you must return phone calls during the class period, exit the classroom as unobtrusively as possible and take the call outside. If you anticipate that you may need to answer a call, please position yourself close to the exit so that you do not disturb class when you leave. 4) Arrive in class on time. 5) no laptop computers are allowed without the express permission of the professor.
LEARNING ACCOMMODATIONS:
I will be delighted to assist students who present to me proper verification of their need for learning accommodations. Please inform the professor at the beginning of the semester in order to make arrangements for completing assignments.


History 344 SAMPLE EXAM Graybill


PART I – Extra Credit – One line only!
1. When did Europeans first explore California?
2. When did Russian fur traders build Fort Ross?
3. When was California admitted to the Union?
4. When was the Wheatland Riot?
5. When was the UFW formed? By Whom?


PARTS II & III ON REVERSE SIDE

In the questions you choose to answer in Parts II & III, be sure to discuss the relevance of the main theme of the course to the subject matter of the question.
And, please double-space your essays in your green book to make them easier to read.


PART II – Essay – 50% – Answer ONE of the following questions from the textbook and lectures:
1. Explain the similarities and differences among the various Indian "culture areas" of California.

(Chapter 2, Question 2)


In your answer to the question above, explain (from your understanding of lecture material) the diversity of Native Californians.
2. What were the reasons for the limited Spanish commitment to the development of Alta California? (Chapter 4, Question 1)
In your answer, drawing on lecture and the text, explain the operations of the Spanish government in North America in the 18th century.
3. Write an essay that assesses the motives and rationalizations used to justify the oppression of racial minorities in California during the 1850s and 1860s.

(Chapter 11, Question 2)


How does the textbook answer the question above? Also, drawing on lecture material, explain the genocide of California between 1845 and 1880.

PART III – Essay – 50% – Answer ONE of the following questions from the textbook and lectures:
1. Summarize the main provisions and consequences of the constitution of 1879.

(Chapter 15, Question 3)


How does the textbook answer the question above? Also, discuss, from lecture, the alternative concepts of freedom at the heart of the competing visions for California at the California Constitutional Convention in 1878-1879.
2. Describe the status of women in twentieth-century California. What economic and political gains have been made? What problems of inequality remain?

(Chapter 30, Question 2)


How does the textbook answer the question above? Also, discuss, from lecture, the following: The Civil Rights Act of 1964, and “affirmative action” programs based on that act, did more for women than any other single act of the twentieth century (including the 19th Amendment).
3. What have been the major trends in California education since World War II?

(Chapter 31, Question 2)


How does the textbook answer the question above? Also, discuss, from lecture, Propositions 187 and 209 in the 1990s.


EXAM PREPARATION INSTRUCTIONS
The midterm and final examinations are structurally identical and will be divided into three parts.

PART I is an extra credit section containing several very short answer questions (drawn from the chronology tables supplied later in this syllabus). PARTS II & III will examine you on textbook and lecture material. Please bring a green book to all exams!
Essay questions on PARTS II & III of the exams will be drawn from POTENTIAL ESSAY QUESTIONS, accompanying each chapter of the textbook, California: An Interpretive History (supplied at the end of this syllabus). So, by the time you complete reading each chapter of textbook, you should be prepared to write an examination essay on each of the POTENTIAL ESSAY QUESTIONS for that chapter (which are included in this syallbus).
FOR EXAMPLE: In PART II of the first midterm exam, I will choose, at random, TWO or THREE of the POTENTIAL ESSAY QUESTIONS from chapters 1-6 in the textbook, California, and place those questions on the exam (there are a total of 12 POTENTIAL ESSAY QUESTIONS in chapters 1-6). You will then write an ESSAY on ONE of those three questions – the one question that you think you are best able to answer.
On PART III of the first midterm exam, I will choose, at random, TWO or THREE of the POTENTIAL ESSAY QUESTIONS from chapters 7-12 in the textbook, California, and place those questions on the exam (there are a total of 11 POTENTIAL ESSAY QUESTIONS in chapters 7-12). You will then write an ESSAY on ONE of those three questions – the one question that you think you are best able to answer.
In PART II of the second midterm exam, I will choose, at random, TWO or THREE of the POTENTIAL ESSAY QUESTIONS from chapters 13-16 in the textbook, California, and place those questions on the exam (there are a total of 11 POTENTIAL ESSAY QUESTIONS in chapters 13-16). You will then write an ESSAY on ONE of those three questions – the one question that you think you are best able to answer.
On PART III of the second midterm exam, I will choose, at random, TWO or THREE of the POTENTIAL ESSAY QUESTIONS from chapters 17-22 in the textbook, California, and place those questions on the exam (there are a total of 10 POTENTIAL ESSAY QUESTIONS in chapters 18-22). You will then write an ESSAY on ONE of those three questions – the one question that you think you are best able to answer.
In PART II of the final exam, I will choose, at random, TWO or THREE of the POTENTIAL ESSAY QUESTIONS from chapters 23-29 in the textbook, California, and place those questions on the exam (there are a total of 15 POTENTIAL ESSAY QUESTIONS in chapters 25-30). You will then write an ESSAY on ONE of those three questions – the one question that you think you are best able to answer.
On PART III of the final exam, I will choose, at random, TWO or THREE of the POTENTIAL ESSAY QUESTIONS from chapters 30-36 in the textbook, California, and place those questions on the exam (there are a total of 17 POTENTIAL ESSAY QUESTIONS in chapters 31-36). And, remember, you’ll answer the one question that you think you are best able to answer.


INSTRUCTIONS FOR COMPOSING EXAM PREPARATION CARDS:
In order to assist you in writing your essays, during the Midterm and the Final examinations you may use EXAM PREPARATION CARDS, if you take the time to create them. You may prepare an essay in response to each of the POTENTIAL ESSAY QUESTIONS for California: An Interpretive History.
For example, on the FIRST MIDTERM EXAM, you may compose a total of 23 3x5 NOTE CARDS (one for each POTENTIAL ESSAY QUESTION) for chapters 1-12 of California: An Interpretive History.
During the examinations you may use (but are NOT required to create) EXAM PREPARATION CARDS (on 3x5 notecards) to assist you in writing your essays. You may prepare notes to write an essay in response to each of the "Potential Essay Questions" for each chapter of California: An Interpretive History.
If you decide to prepare cards for Part II & III of the exams, your cards should conform to the following rules:
On a 3x5 notecard, you may include:
1) NAME in the upper right hand corner - REQUIRED FOR ANY CARDS YOU CREATE
2) you may write out, longhand, the QUESTION from the "Potential Essay Questions" supplied

for the relevant chapter of California: An Interpretive History.


3) you may identify the BOOK and the CHAPTER number from which the question comes.
4) a THESIS STATEMENT for the essay you intend to write.
5) a FIVE POINT OUTLINE for the essay you intend to write.
In this outline, you may write a complete topic sentence. You may also include all the

factual information that you might include in the essay. That is, you may include dates,



names, events, movements, organizations, geographical locations, etc. You may include as

much of this sort of information as you can crowd onto the card. You may hand the card or

you may also type it.
With the exception of the thesis statement and the topic sentence for the outlines, however,

YOU MAY NOT WRITE COMPLETE SENTENCES ON THE CARD, AND YOU MAY NOT COPY THE ESSAY ON TO YOUR CARD!

Remember! The cards are VOLUNTARY! You are not required to make them, but you will almost certainly do better on the exams if you do make them. If you decide to make the cards and use them on the exam, you must submit the cards you use for writing the exam essays with your green book. Don’t forget to bring a green book to all exams!
INSTRUCTIONS FOR WRITING FORMAL ESSAYS (PAY CAREFUL ATTENTION!!!!):
The textbook, California: An Interpretive History, as well as the lectures, films, and other class materials are the subject matter for the 5 page formal essays assigned for this class.
Due Tuesday November 20
To prepare for this assignment, read the following essay questions and pick the one question that most interests you. You should then read the textbook and review lectures and class materials for all the information that might help you answer your question.


  1. Imagine that you are a Kumeyaay Indian standing on the shore of a great bay, what European settlers will later call, San Diego Bay, on the morning of May 14, 1769. Off in the distance, you see a number of strange looking vessels coming into the bay (the first European settlers to the region). Unlike your loved ones in the tribe, you have foreknowledge of the future. Explain to them, in detail, what is going to happen in their homeland over the next 75-100 years, and then suggest to them what you think might be the best strategy for dealing with those changes.




  1. Imagine that you have an opportunity to sit down and have discussion with Juan Crespi, Junipero Serra, and Gaspar de Portola about what they thought they were doing in late Eighteenth-century, why they were doing it, and the resulting consequences for relationships among Spanish soldiers, missionaries, and Indians. If you could talk to them about how future generations would view their actions, what would you tell them. Why would future generations’ view of their actions differ from their own?




  1. Imagine that you can have a conversation with a Spanish missionary in one of California’s Franciscan missions in California in 1810. Ask him to describe the daily lives of the people, native and nonnative, who occupied the presidios, missions, ranchos, and pueblos. How do you think he would he respond if you asked him WHY people lived the way they did at that time?

4. Write a work of historical fiction, a memoir of a Californio (male or female) who was born in Spanish California in 1800, and lived in California throughout the Spanish and Mexican eras. Drawing on the descriptions of the Californio period in the textbook, describe this individual’s life – i.e., the major events, historical forces, ideas, attitudes, beliefs, ways of life, and social customs that influenced this individual’s life and development.


5. Construct an imaginary discussion between four people – James Beckworth, John Bidwell, John C. Fremont, and Pio Pico. What would a discussion between them be like if the topic was “what were the various routes to California in the Nineteenth-century, and how and why did people travel to California on those routes, and what were their experiences like?”
6. Imagine that you are a time-traveling oral historian, interested in the consequences of the California Gold Rush. Interview four people, John A. Sutter, Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo, Louise Clapp, and Biddy Mason. What would they tell you about the Gold Rush?
7. Construct an imaginary discussion between two people, Henry George and Carey McWilliams. What would they say about their experience of California?

8. Construct an imaginary discussion between four people – all of whom are individuals of color. Assume that two of these individuals came to California in the second half of the Nineteenth-century (1850-1900), and the other two came to California in the second half of the Twentieth-century (1950-2000). The topic of their discussion is “what were the experiences of non-white immigrants to California, and what factors most influenced their experience?”


9. Write a biography of a man or woman you know over the age of sixty (this person may be a relative, a neighbor, a coworker, etc). Learn as much as you can about this person’s life before writing. The best biographers not only focus on the individual they are writing about; they also attempt to explain for the reader the times that individual lived through and how the times shaped that person’s life (that is, the culture, the society, the politics, economics, major events, etc.). Thus the title of your biography should be something like,

The Life and Times of _________ ______________.
If you decide to write on this last question, be careful, because it can be the trickiest. Writing a good biography is tough, because it not only requires a good familiarity with the crucial events of the subject’s life, but, more broadly, the major historical forces and events that shaped their experiences. That is, you should be thoroughly familiar with the entire history of the country during their lives – and you should precisely explain what major historical forces shaped your subject’s life.
So, any biography written for this class should be richly supported with evidence from the textbook, California: An Interpretive History. Essays that have little or no supporting evidence from the textbook, and demonstrate little familiarity with it, will receive a failing grade,

You have wide creative latitude to decide how to construct your essays. But, be careful. In your essays be SPECIFIC, be historically PRECISE, and be ACCURATE!


Essays that are general, imprecise, and vague will demonstrate a lack of serious application and will be graded accordingly.
You may consult outside sources. BUT, ABOVE ALL, YOUR GRADE ON THIS ASSIGNMENT WILL BE BASED ON HOW WELL YOU DEMONSTRATE A THOROUGH COMMAND OF THE RELEVANT SUBJECT MATTER FOR THE QUESTION FROM THE TEXTBOOK AND CLASS MATERIALS!

ORGANIZATION AND MECHANICS OF FORMAL ESSAYS
1. Essays should be composed in the following manner:
approximately 5 pages, typed, double-spaced, 12 pt. font, 1" margins, with a title page, and

should include an introductory paragraph, a body, and a conclusion.


2. The introduction should provide just that – an introduction to the imaginary conversation. A good introduction provides a thesis statement (a single sentence or a small number of sentences that decisively state an argument or position that you will develop and demonstrate in your essay) and a brief statement of the main points you intend to develop in your essay. Or, to put it another way, the introduction should introduce the WHO? WHAT? WHERE? WHEN? factual elements of your essay. WHO are the main figures in this story? WHAT is it about? WHERE does it take place? WHEN does it take place?
3. The body should be composed of several paragraphs that support your thesis and main points of your essay. Above all, the body should provide hard EVIDENCE and EXAMPLES, drawn from the California: An Interpretive History and class materials sufficient to prove your thesis.
In this sense, your creative essay should demonstrate thorough familiarity with the time period in question. That is, you should read the relevant chapters in the textbook thoroughly and refer to evidence from those chapters to support your essay.
More than any other single criteria, your work will be judged on the quality of your analysis of precise and specific examples and evidence from the textbook and class materials!
So you should devote most of your time to assembling and intelligently examining evidence and examples!
For the purposes of the essay you will be writing, the term "evidence" includes examples and major ideas drawn from the textbook and class materials. Thus your essay should contain numerous quotations drawn specifically from California: An Interpretive History, and your writing should carefully examine the evidence and main ideas of the sources you will be reading.
While you may consult other sources for essay on your own, the essay you write must be supported by evidence from the textbook and class materials. If your essay does not demonstrate command of class material, no matter how much outside material you use, it will receive a failing grade!
4. The conclusion can be constructed in a variety of ways: it may be a brief summary of the main points of your essay; it may also be a restatement of your thesis; but the best conclusion is one that demonstrates the historical significance of the issue you are examining and your analysis of it.
When you read over your essay before submitting it, you should be sure that the WHO? WHAT? WHERE? WHEN? and WHY? questions have been answered.
5. Quotations and evidence should be cited in the following style:
If you quote from the textbook:
According to James Rawls, “the first objective of the whole expedition was the founding of a presidio and a mission at San Diego as a way station for the journey to Monterey.” (California, p. 37)
If you quote from class materials:
Theodore Judah declared in 1858 that, “the Sierra Nevada mountains are a challenging obstacle to the construction of a Railroad to California, but the are not an insurmountable obstacle.” (Film, The Transcontinetal Railroad).
If you quote from lecture:
Economic depressions in the nineteenth century were gradually lasting longer, becoming more frequent and more severe. (Graybill, 10-6-12)
If you quote from some other source, identify it more completely in a works cited page.
5. When you write about the past, use the simple past tense.
Avoid constructions such as the following:

“After the arrival of Anglo-Americans, the Californios would lose their status as the

preeminent social group in California.”
Substitute above with:

“After the arrival of Anglo-Americans, the Californios lost their status as the

preeminent social group in California.”
6. Avoid passive sentences (e.g. “mistakes were made”). Thus, avoid forms of the verb “to be”, especially “was” and “were”. Use active verbs wherever possible (e.g. “Earl Warren made a mistake”). Passive voice often obscures meaning, while the active makes responsibility clear.
For example:
Passive Voice Construction:

Early in the crisis, many alternative responses were considered (who is “considering”?)


Active Voice Construction:

Early in the crisis, the leaders of the movement considered several alternative responses (responsibility is clear).


7. Write at least one rough draft, and then read it thoroughly to identify and correct weaknesses in logic, style, spelling, grammar, and evidence.
REMEMBER!
YOUR GRADE ON THIS ASSIGNMENT WILL BE BASED ON HOW WELL YOU DEMONSTRATE A COMMAND OF THE RELEVANT SUBJECT MATTER FROM THE TEXTBOOK AND CLASS MATERIALS FOR THE QUESTION YOU CHOOSE TO ANSWER!

Assistance on the Formal Essays from the Professor and the Writing Center
I encourage all students to come see me during my office hours to discuss your formal essays. If you are having any difficulties at all, or if you simply need pointers about how to do the assignment, don’t hesitate to come see me.
Moreover, the Writing Center will be available to help students over the summer in LR144, Mondays and Thursdays, from 10 am to 3 pm. Students with writing assignments from any SCC summer course can come in and sign up to work with a tutor. Writing tutoring will be available in the Writing Center beginning June 13.
A WARNING ON PLAGIARISM!
Plagiarism is literary and intellectual thievery! It is the wholesale use of somebody else’s material, and an attempt to pass it off as if it were your own, in a paper or an exam essay. The following are examples of the criteria that will be used in this class to identify plagiarism:
1. The use of somebody else’s exact wording, whatever the material, without indicating the source and without using quotation marks or other accepted typographical devises. Changing a few words here and there is not sufficient to avoid plagiarism!
2. Reproducing the whole pattern of organization and points of view of a source without giving credit via standard, in-text, written citation.
3. Reproducing facts, figures, or ideas in a pattern that originates with, and are the property of, a particular source rather than a matter of information commonly available in many sources.
4. Collaborating with other students to the extent that two or more assignments are identical in wording, pattern of organization, or points of view.
Your essays should be composed in your own words, though you may quote passages (with clearly identified quotation marks) and cite facts and evidence from the textbook, lectures, videos, etc. Plagiarism is a serious offense (and I treat it seriously); it can lead to dismissal from the college and severe long-term implications for completing a college or university education in the United States.
ESSAYS WILL BE EVALUATED ACCORDING TO THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA:
1. Organization, logic, coherence (that is, introduction, thesis, body, conclusion, etc.).

2. Content (quantity and quality of evidence, level of analysis, level of command of subject matter).

3. Grammar, syntax, spelling.
The best essays will demonstrate command of the subject matter of the documents as well as careful preparation and composition of the essay.
On the following page is an example of the grading criteria sheet that I will use to score your essay. Use it to prepare for writing the formal essay and to understand the professor’s expectations for your essay. If you use the grading criteria sheet to grade your essay, you’ll have a better idea of how to polish it before you turn it in.
California History GRADING CRITERIA Graybill

Student_____________________________________________________________ Grade________________




CONTENT: 60% of grade <-WELL-DONENEEDS IMPROVEMENT->

Examples – abundant? adequate? scarce? 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1


Examples – detailed, specific, precise, accurate, relevant? 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
Knowledge – demonstrate command of the historical context? 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Knowledge – clear understanding of cause & effect? 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1


Knowledge – identification of a clear chronology? 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
Persuasion – does the essay directly answer the questions? 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
Analysis/Description – critical analysis of subject matter? 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1


ORGANIZATION: 20% of grade <-WELL-DONENEEDS IMPROVEMENT->

Introduction – who? where? what? when? 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1


Thesis – is a thesis present and historically accurate? 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
Body – does the argument support the thesis? 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
Body – clear organizational structure (chronological, thematic, etc.)? 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
Conclusion – conclusion makes the historical significance 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

of the question clear (the “why”?)



COMPOSITION: 20% of grade <-WELL-DONENEEDS IMPROVEMENT->

Syntax/Grammar 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1


Clarity of Sentences 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
Spelling/Textual Errors/Punctuation 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
Is it clear essay conforms to syllabus instructions? 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Please come see me if you have any questions or would like additional help!

Prof. Graybill
A WARNING ON PLAGIARISM!
Plagiarism is literary and intellectual thievery! It is the wholesale use of somebody else’s material, and an attempt to pass it off as if it were your own, in a paper or an exam essay. The following are examples of the criteria that will be used in this class to identify plagiarism:
1. The use of somebody else’s exact wording, whatever the material, without indicating the source and without using quotation marks or other accepted typographical devises. Changing a few words here and there is not sufficient to avoid plagiarism!
2. Borrowing the whole pattern of organization and points of view of a source without giving credit via standard in-text written citation.
3. Borrowing facts, figures, or ideas that originated with and are the property of a particular source rather than a matter of common information available in many sources.
4. Collaborating with other students to the extent that two or more assignments are identical in wording, pattern of organization, or points of view.

Plagiarism is a serious offense (and I treat it seriously). It can lead to dismissal from the college and severe long-term implications for completing a college or university education in the United States.



Select List of Major Topics and Themes Covered in this Course:
1. California Prior to “the European Invasion”

2. The Societies and Cultures of Original Californians
3. The Evolution of California’s Natural Environment
4. Spanish Exploration and Settlement, from the 16th to the 19th Century
5. Mission Society and Culture in the 19th Century
6. “Californio” Society
7. Ibero-American and Anglo-American versions of the concept of “Race”
8. The “American” Conquest, 1845-1850
9. California’s Holocaust: The Extermination of Native Californians
10. The Gold Rush and the Railroad Era
11. The Evolution of Anti-Asian Prejudice in California
12. Labor/Business Conflict
13. The Origins and Achievements of California Progressivism
14. The Rise of Southern California
15. The Impact of the Great Depression
16. World War II and California
17. The Civil Rights Movement, the UFW, and the Hispanic Movement
18. The Turmoil of the 1960s
19. The Legacy of Proposition 13
20. The Evolution of Modern California Conservatism
21. The Evolution and Consequences of Immigration, 1965-2008
22. California’s Modern Multicultural Society

Essay questions on
Download 145 Kb.

Share with your friends:
  1   2   3




The database is protected by copyright ©sckool.org 2022
send message

    Main page