Having any of the following problems?



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Chapter 6

Having any of the following problems?

  • I drift or lose my concentration during a lecture.
  • My class notes are not organized well for studying.
  • I write too much when I take notes.
  • Or: I write too slowly & miss points.
  • What else?
  • Copyright © 2016 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.

Learning Outcomes

  • Develop active listening skills for the classroom.
  • Use the three-step process of effective notetaking.
  • Prepare study-ready notes by utilizing the outline or column formats for notetaking.
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It’s not just for college!

  • Active listening & good notetaking skills will also serve you well throughout your career.
  •  How will you use active listening at your workplace?
  • Copyright © 2016 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.

Active Listening: Classroom Attitudes & Habits

  • Coming to class prepared with assignments completed.
  • Bringing questions or thoughts about the reading.
  • Sitting near the front of class, attentive & focused. (Communicates your interest.)
  • Using self-talk that says “I am interested, I want to learn, & I will stay focused”— Not: “This is boring!”
  • Concentrating, listening for clues to tests, & taking organized, study-ready notes.
  • Being determined & open about listening & learning.
  •  It’s not just for nerds!
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The Importance of Notetaking

  • The process of thinking & writing while listening helps push information into your long-term memory.
  • You preserve the major points of the lecture in writing so you can study from them later.
  • Both important for remembering & performing well on exams.
  • Copyright © 2016 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.

Effective Notetaking  a 3-Step Process

  • Listening: interested, attentive, maintains a positive attitude about learning, in spite of distractions.
  • Thinking about the meaning of what is said so you can select the most important information to remember.
  • Writing down the most important information so you’ll be able to review & study it later.
  •  Sound easy?  You get better with practice!
  • Copyright © 2016 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.

Notetaking Tips

  • Use a 3-ring binder—better for organizing & adding.
  • OR set up your laptop/notebook so you can take organized notes.
  • Computers are great for reorganizing & inserting additional notes, but just in case, bring additional paper for diagrams & illustrations.
  • Have you found a good notetaking application that you would recommend?
  • Leave plenty of space for additional explanation, comments, or study clues.
  • Record definitions of technical terms exactly as given.
  • Copy the diagrams & drawings.
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Notetaking Tips continued

  • Record your instructor’s examples.
  • Take notes during group discussions.
    • Group problem-solving questions often show up as essay questions on tests.
  • Take notes throughout class.
  • For speedier notetaking, leave out words— such as “a” and “the”—from your notes.
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Notetaking Tips continued

  • Write phrases/names in full the first time & use initials thereafter.
  • Create headings to help you further learn & organize notes.
  • Fill in blanks & review notes as soon as possible after class.
  • Review frequently to solidify material in your mind.
    • To “lock in” material, briefly review all notes between exams on a daily basis—it only takes a few minutes & it’s worth it.
  • Copyright © 2016 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.

Notetaking Tips continued

  • 13. Use the top margin to note assignments, course, date, and the page number.
  • Course: Social Science Assignment: Read chap 12
  • Date: May 2, 2017 complete all chap ques
  • Page: 1 Due: May 8
  • Copyright © 2016 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.

Notetaking Tips continued

  • Note the points your instructor stresses by placing a star or asterisk (*) in the margin next to the items emphasized.
  • Copyright © 2016 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.

15. Here are some of the ways your instructor verbally cues you on important points.

  • A major point . . .
  • Pay special attention
  • to . . .
  • Note this . . .
  • An important reason . . .
  • Don’t forget . . .
  • A chief cause . . .
  • What do you think is the reason for this?
  • This will probably be on the test . . .
  • Repeated statements
  • Numbered lists
  • The instructor’s voice slows down
  • Copyright © 2016 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.

To take speedier notes, use abbreviations & symbols that you can easily remember.

          • Examples
          • e.g. for example
          • = the same as
          • ≠ not the same as
          • > greater than
          • < less than
          • w/ with
          • w/o without
          • betw between
          • X times
          • # number
          • / per
          • promotes, produces, leads to
          • __ Other shortcuts?
  • Copyright © 2016 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.

Two Effective Notetaking Formats

  • Outline format
  • Column format
    • Effective notetaking formats will help you prepare study-ready notes.
    • Determine which style you prefer.
  • Copyright © 2016 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.

Outline Format

  • Course: Sociology of Aging Assignment: Read chap 6
  • Date: Sept. 16, 2016 complete all chap ques
  • Page: 1 Due: Sept. 23
  • Generational Diversity
    • Value system unique to a particular age group
    • Generations shaped by common experiences, memories, & lessons learned
    • Have own TV shows, music, styles, & expressions
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Outline Format continued

  • Course: Sociology of Aging
  • Date: Sept. 16, 2016
  • Page: 2
  • The Four Generations & Dates of Birth
    • Veterans (Traditionalists)—1922–1943
    • Baby Boomers—1943–1960
    • Gen X—1960–1980
    • Gen Y (Millennials) —1980–2000
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Outline Format continued

  • Course: Sociology of Aging
  • Date: Sept. 16, 2016
  • Page: 3
  • Value Systems Impact Work Styles  Key Behavior Styles
  • Veterans
    • Patience
    • Constancy
  • A sense of hierarchy
  • Loyalty
  • Baby Boomers
  • Relationship building
  • Commitment
  • Systematic perspective
  • Copyright © 2016 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.

Outline Format continued

    • Gen X’ers—key behavior styles
    • Flexibility
    • Loyalty
    • Independence
    • Gen Y’ers—key behavior styles
    • Independence
    • Collaboration
    • Persistence
  • Copyright © 2016 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.

Column Format

  • Copyright © 2016 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
  • Course: Human Behavior Assignment: Read chap 12
  • Date: Sept. 16, 2016 complete all chap ques
  • Page: 1 Due: Sept. 23
  • Left Column Right Column
  • Terms Definitions
  • Main ideas Details
  • Illustrations Labels
  • Process description

Column Format (Terms & Definitions)

  • Ethnocentrism view that one’s own culture is superior to others.
  • Prejudice an opinion or learning
  • opposed to anything without just grounds or sufficient
  • knowledge.
  • Copyright © 2016 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
  • Course: Human Behavior Assignment: Read chap 12
  • Date: Sept. 16, 2016 complete all chap ques
  • Page: 1 Due: Sept. 23

Column Format (Main Ideas & Details)

  • Copyright © 2016 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
  • Course: Human Relationship Skills Assignment: Read chap 9
  • Date: Sept. 16, 2016 complete ques 9–18
  • Page: 4 Due: Sept. 23
  • 3 behavior/ 1. Nonassertive
  • communication 2. Aggressive
  • styles 3. Assertive
  • Assertive Express thoughts, feelings,
  • communication beliefs in direct, honest, &
  • appropriate ways that
  • respect the rights of others.

Column Format (illustrations & labels)

  • Cell body
  • Nucleus
  • Dendrites (receivers)
  • Axon (the conducting fiber)
  • Myelin sheath (insulating fatty layer that speeds transmission)
  • Schwan’s Cells (they make myelin)
  • Axon terminals (transmitters)
  • Node of Ranvier
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  • Course: Anatomy Assignment: Read chap 5
  • Date: Sept. 16, 2016 & prepare for quiz
  • Page: 1 Due: Sept. 23

Column Format (illustration & process)

  • Neurons transmit impulses along an axon & across the synapse to the dendrites of the neighboring cell.
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  • Course: Anatomy
  • Date: Sept. 16, 2016
  • Page: 2

Important: Your preparation before class will help you take better notes.

  • Complete all writing & reading assignments
  • Review & test yourself on previous notes.
  •  This preparation will keep you sharp & give you the basic background for lectures.
  • Copyright © 2016 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.

Which notetaking format do you prefer?

  • Outline Format
  • or
  • Column Format
  • And why?
  • Copyright © 2016 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.

Key Chapter Points

  • Active listening & notetaking, like any other skills, will improve quickly with practice.
  • Both are useful tools for success in school, & will continue to be useful on your job.
  • Copyright © 2016 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.


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