Grand Lodge of New York Masonic Lodge Histories Lodge Nos. 201-230


Palestine Lodge No. 204, New York City



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Palestine Lodge No. 204, New York City

Warrant: The warrant under which the Lodge is working is dated 27 Dec 1850.

The name has never been changed. It was No. 14 on the register of St. John's Grand Lodge.

Minutes: Not intact. All records from 1850 to 1855 are missing.

Palestine Lodge was organized by members of Independent Lodge, No.7 (now No. 185), during the summer of 1850. A petition was prepared and sent to St. John's Grand Lodge on September 3, 1850. The records of that Grand Body state that: "A Warrant was granted to establish Palestine Lodge, of which William Hanigan should be the first Master." The other officers named in the warrant were:

John W. Jackson, Senior Warden John W. Farmer, Junior Warden.


The first applicant for degrees was H. W. Phillips, who was also the first candidate Initiated.

The Lodge remained under the jurisdiction of St. John's Grand Lodge until 27 Dec 1850, when it surrendered its warrant and obtained its present warrant from the Grand Lodge of the State of New York.

It received its present warrant at the great Union meeting in TripIer Hall amid scenes which "baffled description," and became No. 204 on the register of the Grand Lodge of the State of New York.

The warrant named as officers:

William Harrigan, Master.

John W. Jackson, SW

Samuel J. Browning JW.

The absence of the records of the Lodge shrouds its early life in the mist of uncertainty, but in common with the experiences of other Lodges it has had its days of adversity and its period of prosperity and has enjoyed an unbroken existence since its organization in 1850.

It took an active interest in and was largely instrumental in securing funds toward the erection1 of the Masonic Hall on Twenty-third Street.

The first meeting place of the Lodge was at No. 51 Division Street, where it remained until 1855, when it moved to No, 207 Bowery, remaining here until 1864, when it moved to No. 594 Broadway. On 4 May 1865, it moved to the corner of Broome and Crosby Streets, where it remained one year, when it again moved, this time to No. 300 :mast Broadway, remaining here one year, when it moved to the corner of Third Avenue and Seventh Street, where it remained until 1889, when it moved to the corner of Third Avenue and Sixtieth Street, remaining there two years, when it moved into the Masonic Hall on Twenty-third Street. In Sep 1909, it moved to the Masonic Hall on Twenty-fourth Street,

GRAND LODGE OFFICERS.

Robert W. Hyslop, Grand Representative Sidney May, Grand Representative

Masters


1850. William Harrigan.

1851. William Hanigan.

1852. Samuel J, Browning.

1853. John M. W. Jackson.

1854. Michael Flood.

1855. Michael Flood.

1856. Henry R. Jackson.

1857. Henry R. Jackson.

1858. Henry R. Jackson.

1859. William Prankard.

1860. William Prankard.

1861. William Prankard.

1862. Charles H. Cook.

1863. Edward Monihan.

1864. Richard 'Evans.

1865. Richard Evans.

1866. Richard Evans.

1867. Gilbert B, Wood.

1868. Edward Nolan.

1869. Edward Nolan.

1870. Edward Nolan.

1871. Gilbert B. Wood.

1872. Gilbert B. Wood.

1873. Buel D. Penfield.

1874, Buel D. Penfield.

1875. Buel D. Penfield.

1876. Augustus G. Cook.

1877. Augustus G. Cook,

1878. Augustus G. Cook.

1879. Henry M. Ahrens.

1880. Andrew J. Dupignac.

1881. Andrew J. Duplgnac.

1882. Andrew J. Dupignac.

1888. Andrew J' Dupignac.

1884. Robert Hyslop.

1885. Robert Hyslop.

1886. Bernard S. Davis.

1887. Bernard S. Davis.

1888. Richard Evans,

1889. Richard Evans.

1890, Jacob Leslie.

1891. Jacob Leslie. ­

1892. August W. Holmberg.

1893. August W. Holmberg.

1894. Axel D'. Holmberg.

1895. Charles L. Holmberg.

1896. Richard Hughes.

1897. Richard Hughes.

1898. Gustave F; Stone.

1899. Gustave F. Stone. .

1900. Joseph Kirk,

1901. Louis May.

1902. UIfert H. Meyer.

1903. Solly May.

1904. Siegfried S. Zarek.

1905. Henry A. McCarthy.

1906. Alfred D. Lind.

1907. Charles Faulhaber.

1908. Samuel J. Corker.

1909. Sidney May.

1910. Elisha K. Ramee.



Hyatt Lodge No. 205, Brooklyn, New York

Warrant: The warrant in possession of the Lodge is dated 27 Dec 1850.

The name has never been changed. It was No, 24 on the register of St. John's Grand Lodge.

Minutes: Intact.

Hyatt Lodge was organized on Wednesday evening, 11 Sep 1850, in a building on the corner of Grand and Seventh Streets (now Havemeyer Street), known as Masonic Hall, In the village of Williamsburgh, now a part of the Borough of Brooklyn, New York City. William Weekes, of Marsh Lodge No. 10 (now 188), was selected as Chairman and Robert T. Hendrick, of the same Lodge, was selected as Secretary.

The following were elected.

Reuben S. Van Tassel, Master.

Josephus Bond, Senior Warden.

John Skinner, Junior Warden.

Harris Comstock, Treasurer.

Robert T. Hendrick, Secretary.

Charter Members.



Bennett, George C.

Bond, Josephus

Briggs, C. M.

Comstock, Harris

Cooper, W. H.

Faulkner, James

Guischard, W. H.

Hendrick, Robert T.

Hendrick, James

Hoggett, William.

Jackson, M. M.

James, William.

Johnson, A. C.

Licht, Frederick

Montgomery, John.

Nowell, James D.

Owens, Ashley L.

Palmer, John.

Skinner, John

Sparks, Caspian A.

Trott, John S, Jr,

Van Tassel, Reuben S.

Wall, Edward

Week(e)s, William


The Lodge continued to work under the jurisdiction of St. .John's Grand Lodge until December 21, 1850, when at the great Union meeting held in' Tripler Hall, Broadway, New York City, It received a new warrant and became No. 205 on the register of the Grand Lodge of the State of New York. '

The first meeting place was in Masonic Hall, corner of Grand and Seventh Streets, where it remained until May 1863, when it moved to the corner of South Third Street and Bedford Avenue, where it remained until May 1871, when it moved to No. 89 (now No. 99) Broadway. In Jan 1900, It moved to its present quarters in Aurora. Grata cathedral, corner of Bedford Avenue and Madison Street.
It participated in the ceremonies attending the laying of the corner­stone of the Masonic Hall, Twenty-third Street, New York, 8 Jun 1870, and of the laying of the cornerstone of the Brooklyn Masonic Hall 23 Nov 1907. It was also present at the dedication of St. Mark’s Church, Brooklyn, and the dedication of the Home at Utica, N. Y.

Men in Public Life



Abram H. Dailey, Surrogate.

Frederick W. Wurster, Mayor

John M. Ranken, County Clerk.

William C. Bryant, Fire Commissioner.



Grand Lodge Officers

Charles W. Hubbell, DDGM

Frederick S. Benson, DDGM

Everett E. Wheeler, DDGM

Francis T. Burr, DDGM

John D. Kennedy, Grand Chaplain.

Charles F. Laighton, Grand Representative

Lewis A. McMillan, Grand Sword Bearer.

Masters


1850. Reuben S. Van Tassel.

1851. Reuben S. Van Tassel.

1852. Caspian A. Sparks.

1853. Caspian A. Sparks.

1854. Jared Sparks.

1855. Henry Wright.

1856. George T. Kellam.

1857. George T. Kellam.

1858. Abel O. Wilmarth.

1859. Charles M. Foster.

1860. H. W. Marsh.

1861. Joseph H. Thomas.

1862. Joseph H. Thomas.

1863. Joseph H. Thomas.

1864. Abram H. Dailey.

1865. George McKay.

1866. George McKay.

1867. George W. Harris.

1868. Richard R, Latimer.

1869. William A. Brown.

1870. William H. Darbee.

1871. Joseph Fox.

1872. Samuel Adams.

1873. William H. Darbee.

1874. Charles W. Hubbell.

1875. Charles W. Hubbell.

1876, Ralph W. Kenyon.

1877. Robert P. Lethbridge.

1878. Charles B. Watts.

1879. William H. Liscomb.



1880. Caleb A. Eabry.

1881. Charles F. Lamr.

1882. Charles F. Lamy.

1883. Frederick T. Benson.

1884. Geoffrey J. Olden.

1885. Thomas Conner.

1886. Charles W. Hubbell.

1887. Joseph Fox.

1888. William P. Sturgis.

1889. William H. Liscomb.

1890. Journeay H. Small.

1891. Charles W. Hubbell.

1892. Charles W. Hubbell.

1893, John Burrell.

1894. Charles F. Laighton.

1895. Lewis A.. McMillan.

1896. John D. Kennedy.

1897. J. Carlisle Loudon.

1898. Fred Little.

1899. John H. Mill.

1900. Francis T. Burr.

1901. Lawrence Coffin.

1902. Everett m. Wheeler.

1903. Everett m. Wheeler.

1904. Howard C. Loudon.

1905. Albert B. Comstock.

1906, Alfred S. Hughes.

1907. Marcus O. Burr.

1908. John W. Burr.

1909. Ferd. Van S. Parr.

1910. William J. Hallett.



Empire City Lodge No. 206, New York City

Warrant: The warrant in possession of the Lodge is dated 27 Dec 1850.

Name and Number: The first name was Shibboleth and the first number was 25.

Minutes: Intact

The Lodge was organized in the autumn of 1850; a dispensation was obtained from M.’.W.’. Henry C. Atwood, Grand Master of St. John’s Grand Lodge, and the name selected for the Lodge was Shibboleth.

The first meeting was held 14 Oct 1850, with the following as officers:

John D. Moriarty, Master

Wade B. Worrall, SW

Robert J. Reed, JW

William H. Arthur Treasurer


Scarcely had the Lodge become organized when, for some unexplained reason the name was changed to Empire City.

The Lodge continued to work under dispensation until the latter part of November, when a petition was presented to St. John’s Grand Lodge setting forth that the Lodge had been working for some time under the dispensation issued by the Grand Master and asked that a warrant be granted, as it desired to continue its organization under the authority of the St. John’s Grand Lodge. On 8 Dec 1850 a warrant was granted and it became Empire City No. 25 on the register of St. John’s Grand Lodge.

This warrant remained in force less than one month, as at the great Union meeting of 27 Dec 1850, it was surrendered. The Lodge received its present warrant and became No. 206 on the register of the Grand Lodge of the State of New York.

The new warrant named as officers:

Wade B. Worrall, Master

Robert J. Reed, SW

William H. Arthur, JW
Meeting Places:

The first meeting place was at No. 71 Division Street, where it remained until May 1851, when it moved to Odd Fellows’ Hall, corner of Grand and Centre Streets. In May 1862 it moved to No. 817 Broadway, where it remained until May 1866, when it moved to No. 594 Broadway, remaining here but a short time, as on 12 Jun it had quarters on the corner of Broadway and 34th Street, where it remained until May 1869, when it moved into Booth’s Theatre Building, corner of Sixth Avenue and 23rd Street.

In May 1874 it moved into the Masonic Hall on 23rd Street, where it remained 14 years. In May 1888 it moved to the Bloomingdale Building, corner of Third Avenue and 59th Street, remaining here until Mar 1891, when it returned to the Masonic Hall. In May 1893 it moved into its present quarters in the Lexington Assembly rooms, No. 155 East 59th Street.
The Lodge was present at the laying of the cornerstone of the Masonic Hall on 23rd Street, 8 Jun 1870, and was also represented at the laying of the cornerstone of the Home at Utica, 21 May 1891, and the dedication of the same 5 Oct 1892.

Shortly after the Home was erected the Lodge at Lodge at its own expense furnished one of the rooms in the building.

The 1,00th communication was celebrated in an appropriate manner on 20 Oct 1886. On this occasion an address was delivered by W.’. Joseph P. Jardine.

The fiftieth anniversary of the Lodge was celebrated by a reception and banquet at the Hotel Savoy, 29 Dec 1900.

The Lodge has been peculiarly fortunate in having a faithful and competent Secretary. Bro. Jacob L. Cohn has served in that office for 38 consecutive years.

Men in Public Service



Gerson N. Herman, Coroner

Joseph I. Stein, Assemblyman

Meyer J. Stein, Assemblyman

Jacob Levy, Assemblyman

Henry M. Goldfogle, Congressman, District Court Judge

Edward Kaufman, County Clerk, Tax Commissioner



Jacob Frankenthal, Grand Steward, Grand Lodge of Nevada

Joseph L. Stein, DDGM

Joseph W. Stein, Grand Steward

William Klingenstein, DDGM

George van Vliet, DDGM

Masters



1850 John D. Moriarty

1851 Wade B. Worrall

1852 Robert J. Reed

1853 John F. Brown

1854 Charles S. Westcott

1855 Charles S. Westcott

1856 Charles S. Westcott

1857 Edmund S. Henry

1858 William B. Shove

1859 William G. Ames

1860 William G. Ames

1861 William G. Ames

1862 William G. Ames

1863 William G. Ames

1864 George Van Vliet

1865 George Van Vliet

1866 Joseph F. Rosenbaum

1867 Joseph R. Jardine

1868 Joseph R. Jardine

1869 Samuel M. Cohen

1870 Samuel M. Cohen

1871 Simon Weinschenck

1872 Simon Weinschenck

1873 Asher B. Fox

1874 Asher B. Fox

1875 Ferdinand Salomon

1876 Ferdinand Salomon

1877 Joseph I. Stein

1878 Joseph I. Stein

1879 Jacob Frankenthal

1880 Anselm Brill

1881 Simeon Wolf

1882 Jacob Rothschild

1883 Simon S. Stern

1884 Simon S. Stern

1885 Morris Brill

1886 Morris J. Newwitter

1887 William Fisher

1888 Joseph P. Jardine

1889 Morris Levy

1890 Samuel Lewengood

1891 Jacob Lewengood

1892 Meyer J. Stein

1893 Meyer J. Stein

1894 Joseph W. Stein

1895 Joseph W. Stein

1896 Samuel C. Baum

1897 William Klingenstein

1898 William Klingenstein

1899 Solomon M. Stroock

1900 Solomon M. Stroock

1901 Henry M. Goldfogle

1902 Newman N. Leo

1903 Newman N. Leo

1904 Max Z. Stein

1905 Max Z. Stein

1906 Richard M. Adler

1907 Richard M. Adler

1908 Richard M. Adler

1909 Harry Britenstool

1910 William Klingenstein



United States Lodge No. 207, New York City

Warrant: The warrant in possession of the Lodge is dated 27 Dec 1850.

Name and Numbers: The name has never been changed. It was No. 26 under the jurisdiction of the St. John’s Grand Lodge.

Minutes: Not intact. All records previous to 20 Dec 1886 are missing.

United States Lodge was organized in 1849 and worked for a time under a dispensation granted by Henry C. Atwood, Grand Master of St. John’s Grand Lodge. On 3 Dec 1850 it received a warrant from that Grand Body and was the last Lodge to receive a warrant previous to that Grand Lodge being absorbed by the Grand Lodge of the State of New York. it received its present warrant at the Great “Union” meeting held in Tripler’s Hall 27 Dec 1850, 24 days after it had received its first warrant.

Charter Members



Baldwin, Joseph W.

Cooper, William

Donaldson, Joseph

Galbraith, John

Post, Charles F.

Shaw, Henry

Wain, John

Williamson, George

Witten, John

The officers names in both warrants were:

John Galbraith, Master

John Witten, SW

Joseph W. Baldwin, JW

Meeting Places:

The loss of the early records of the Lodge is to be regretted, as this, together with the meager information to be obtained from the records of the Grand Lodge, clouds its early history to such an extent that but little is known of its life and work during a period of over 30 years. There are no existing records which furnish any light upon its organization, neither is in known where it held its meetings for several years after it came into existence. For a time during the fifties its meeting place was in the Odd Fellows’ Hall, corner of Grand and Centre Streets. In 1866 it had its quarters in the same building. In 1874 it was located at No. 117 West 23rd Street. The next year it moved into the Clinton Room in Masonic Hall, on 23rd Street, where it remained until 1886, when it moved to the corner of Sixth and 25th Street, remaining there until Jul 1888, when it moved into rooms over the Harlem Savings Bank, corner of Third Avenue and 124th Street. This move appears to have marked an epoch in the growth and prosperity of the Lodge. For several years previous to this move the Lodge had languished, its attendance was small, caused by the removal of its members “up town.” Therefore this move to a section of the city which at the time was rapidly increasing in population was determined upon. This change in location proved wise and resulted in bringing more activity and strength to the Lodge. In 1888 it had but 56 members upon its rolls; in 1889 it reported a membership of 82, and added strength and prosperity had attended it ever since its removal to Harlem.

On 1 May 1880 it again moved, this time to Third Avenue and 106th Street, remaining there until 5 Mar 1890, when it returned to its old quarters over the Harlem Savings Bank. It Feb 1908 it moved into the Horton Building, No. 110 East 125th Street, remaining here until 5 May 1909, when it moved to its present quarters in the Harlem Masonic Temple, on the corner of Lenox Avenue and 126th Street.

The Lodge was present at the laying of the cornerstone of the Home at Utica, NY, 21 May 1891.

R.’.W.’. Henry D. Hamilton, Past DDGM, has been an active and prominent member of the Lodge since 1889. He was Grand High Priest of the Grand Chapter, RAM, of the State of New York in 1905 and is General Grand Master of the First Veil in the Genreal Grand Chapter, RAM, of the United States. He is a veteran of the Spanish-American War, serving as Major in the 201st NY Volunteers.

Masters


1850 John Galbraith

1851 John Galbraith

1852 John Galbraith

1853 John Galbraith

1854 J. P. Miller

1855 J. P. Miller

1856 J. P. Miller

1857 William H. Thompson

1858 William H. Thompson

1859 William H. Thompson

1860 William H. Thompson

1861 William H. Thompson

1862 Joseph S. Peacock

1863 William Braid

1864 William Sinclair

1865 William Sinclair

1866 George Braid

1867 John H. Salt

1868 Carll S. Howell

1869 Carll S. Howell

1870 Carll S. Howell

1871 Henry Ransom

1872 Henry Ranson

1873 George Braid

1874 John N. Lott

1875 William Harper

1876 William W. Marks

1877 William W. Marks

1878 William W. Marks

1879 George W. Lithgow

1880 W. Willoughby Marks

1881 John G. Alfke

1882 W. Wolcott Marks

1883 W. Wolcott Marks

1884 George Braid

1885 James C. Baldwin

1886 William F. Walker

1887 Miles W. Goodyear

1888 Henry N. Freeman

1889 S. J. H. Howes

1890 Christian Armbruster

1891 James M. Goodenough

1892 Henry D. Hamilton

1893 Charles C. Buddington

1894 Charles C. Buddington

1895 Larrie E. Wood

1896 Thomas D. Kelly

1897 Eugene C. Akers

1898 Charles A. King

1899 Edward Deacon

1900 Charles B. Scholz

1901 Frank R. Uven

1902 C. F. E. Glesselmann

1903 C. F. E. Glesselmann

1904 Ben Z. Sussholz

1905 John M. Reilly

1906 John M. Reilly

1907 James F. Yearsley

1908 Walter L. Kuerr

1909 Thomas A. Straynge

1910 Joseph C. Wootten



Cyrus Lodge No. 208, New York City

Warrant: The warrant in possession of the Lodge is date 4 Mar 1851.

Name and Number: The first name was Atwood. The name was changed to Cyrus 30 Jan 1854. The number has never been changed.

Minutes: Not intact. All records previous to 1857 are lost.

Atwood Lodge, as it was originally called, was organized in 1850 under a dispensation issued by Henry C. Atwood, Grand Master of St. John’s Grand Lodge, after whom it was named.

It continued to work under the jurisdiction of the St. John’s Grand Lodge until the great Union meeting of 27 Dec 1850, when, in common with all the Lodges working under the authority of the St. John’s Grand Lodge, it united with and became a Lodge under the jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of the State of New York, but still working under dispensation.

On 4 Mar 1851 a warrant was granted, which named as officers:

Charles G. Waterbury, Master

Charles F. Newton, SW

Albert G. Bagley, JW

Charter Members


Waterbury, Charles G.

Bagley, Albert G.

Bessey, Charles A.

Lewin, Isaac

Ayers, Eleizer [Eleazer]

Newton, Charles F.

Phillips, William H.

Lewis, Laban

Myers, Erastus

King, John A.


The officer of the Lodge were installed 6 May 1851 by officers of the Grand Lodge, a special meeting being called for the purpose of dedication a Lodge room and installing the officers of Atwood and Worth Lodges.

In 1852 circumstances occurred which caused such dissatisfaction among the members that in order to restore peace and harmony the subject was referred to the Grand Steward’s Lodge, and at a meeting held 29 Sep 182 an effort was made to reconcile the differences and bring about a better state of affairs in the Lodge.

The records of this meeting contain the following:

“This difficulty in Atwood Lodge No. 208, being under consideration, the members of that Lodge were called before the Grand Stewards, who suggested a plan for settling their difficulties, viz.: a separation of their members, a division of all their property, pro rata, which, being submitted to each side separately, was acceded to; all charges being withdrawn and a general, free, frank and brotherly feeling restored among them, the past to be buried in oblivion. The following brethren were appointed by the Grand Stewards as a committee to appraise the property and divide the same: W.’. C. L. Church, W.’. H. F. L. Bunting, W.’. A. Lyons.”

At a quarterly meeting of the Grand Lodge held 1 Mar 1858 the Master of Atwood Lodge presented an appeal protesting against the action of the Grand Stewards, which was referred to a committee for investigation. On 6 Dec 1858 at a quarterly meeting of the Grand Lodge this committee was discharged and a new committee was appointed.

The records of the Grand Lodge under date of 7 Mar 1854 contain the following:

“W.’. James M. Turner, from the Committee appointed at the last quarterly meeting of the Grand Lodge upon the appeal of the Master of Atwood Lodge against the division of the property of said Lodge, by a special committee of the Grand Steward’s Lodge, offered the following resolution, which was adopted:

“Resolved, That the sum of seventy-five dollars be and is hereby appropriated from the funds of this Grand Lodge to Cyprus (late Atwood) Lodge No. 208, for and in consideration of certain losses sustained by said Lodge in the division of property between the members of Metropolitan and Cyprus (late Atwood) Lodge by a special committee appointed by the Grand Steward’s Lodge.”

This it will be noted that the outcome of this vexatious and troublesome episode was the birth of Metropolitan Lodge No. 273, and the rejuvenation of Cyrus Lodge No. 208; harmony was restored, peace and unity again prevailed and nothing has since occurred to mar the progress of the Lodge.

The Lodge took an active interest in every effort made toward the erection of the Masonic Temple of 23rd Street, promptly paying its quota toward extinguishing the “Great Debt” – that incubus which so long prevented the erection of the Home at Utica, NY.

Meeting Places:

The first meeting place was in the Keystone Hotel, corner of Christie and Division Streets. From 1857 to Apr 1868 it met in the Utah House, corner of Eighth Avenue and 25th Street. The next meeting place was on the corner of Eighth Avenue and 18th Street, remaining here until Apr 1870, when it moved to the Decker Building, No. 33 Union Square, returning to its old quarters on 18th Street in May 1878. On 3 May 1875 it moved to the Masonic Hall on 23rd Street, remaining there until May 1878, when it moved to the Tabernacle rooms on West 13th Street, remaining here but one year, when it returned to the Utah House, remaining there until 1885, when these quarters were condemned for Masonic purposes by the Grand Master. In Jun 1885 it moved to the Grand Opera House, corner of Eighth Avenue and 23rd Street, remaining there until May 1892, when it again moved; this time to Circle Hall, Eighth Avenue and 58th Street. In Jan 1897 it returned to the Grand Opera House, remaining there until 1 May 1901, when it moved to the Masonic Hall on 23rd Street. In Sep 1909 it moved into the new Masonic Hall on 24th Street.

The Lodge was represented at the laying of the cornerstone of the Masonic Hall on 23rd Street 8 Jun 1870, the laying of the cornerstone of the Egyptian Obelisk in Central Park 9 Oct 1880, and the laying of the cornerstone of the Home at Utica, NY, 21 May 1891.

When the war for the Union began in 1861 the Lodge passed a resolution releasing all members who volunteered to defense of “Old Glory” from the payment of dues while in the United States service. Several of the members volunteered. Among them were:


Banta, Richard A.

Evans, John J.

Dealing, William H. [17th Infantry]

Jerman, Daniel

Cuttle, George C. [9th Infantry]

Jerman, Thomas [28th Battery]

Thomas, Isaac

Tompkins, Moses J.


Men in Public Life

William D. Snow, Congressman Robert Miller, Assemblyman

Grand Lodge Officers

Robert D. Holmes, Grand Master Robert Miller, Grand Steward

Masters


1851 Charles G. Waterbury

1852 Charles F. Newton

1853 George Clancy

1854 George Clancy

1855 George Arreson

1856 A. G. Shephard

1857 George Clancy

1858 Isaac Lewin

1859 Edwin Ferguson

1860 Henry C. D. Milliken

1861 Henry C. D. Milliken

1862 Henry Bell

1863 Henry C. D. Milliken

1864 David De Meza

1865 David De Meza

1866 Henry A. Russell

1867 Benjamin Weaver, Sr.

1868 Edwin Ferguson

1869 Joseph T. Farrington

1870 Joseph T. Farrington

1871 Joseph T. Farrington

1872 Frederick T. Wood

1873 David De Meza

1874 Richard A. Banta

1875 George D. Davis

1876 George D. Davis

1877 Samuel M. Slater

1878 Samuel M. Slater

1879 Thomas Jerman

1880 Thomas Jerman

1881Solomon Canter

1882 Daniel Jerman

1883 Daniel Jerman

1884 John Lucas

1885 John Lucas

1886 DeWitt S. Thomson

1887 John G. McKirdy

1888 Thomas Jerman

1889 Samuel M. Slater

1890 Richard A. Banta

1891 Richard A. Banta

1892 George Hawkins

1893 John R. Cochrans

1894 Robert Miller, Sr.

1895 Robert Miller, Sr.

1896 John H. Bollas, Sr.

1897 John H. Bollas, Sr.

1898 James E. Algeo

1899 James E. Algeo

1900 John Miller

1901 John Miller

1902 Abraham L. Maynes

1903 Abraham L. Maynes

1904 Howard A. Patterson

1905 Robert Miller, Jr.

1906 Charles M. Bollas

1907 John H. Levengood

1908 Robert H. Pepper

1909 Charles V. Ottinger

1910 Howard A. Patterson




National Lodge No. 209, New York City

Warrant: The warrant in possession of the Lodge is dated 4 Mar 1851

The name or number has never been changed

Minutes: Not intact

The first movement toward organizing National Lodge was at a meeting held at No. 415 Broadway on the evening of 7 Jan 1851.

There were present at this meeting the following:



William D. Benson

Robert T. Gardiner

John A. Hartt

Nathaniel W. Jones

James H. Lane

John A. Hartt was selected as Chairman and Nathaniel W. Jones as Secretary.

A name was decided upon and a petition prepared to be presented to the Grand Lodge asking for a warrant.

The officers selected were:



William D. Benson, Master

Robert T. Gardiner, SW

James H. Lane, JW

Nathaniel W. Jones, Secretary

John A. Hartt, SD

Charles W. Brown, JD


The petition was presented at a session of the Grand Lodge held 4 Mar 1851, and a warrant was immediately granted.

The petition was signed by the following:


Benson, William D.

Lane, James H.

Brown, Charles W.

Jones, Nathaniel W.

Sherlleau, Francis

Snook, Thomas

Gardiner, Robert T.

Hartt, John A.

Brainerd, Amasa

Ryan, Francis B.

Bennett, Thomas T.

Jackson, Charles H.

Neal, Jonathan B.

Bier, George H.


Meeting Places:

The Lodge has been somewhat migratory in its habits, having changed it meeting places 13 times and has changed its meeting night several times, caused by change in location.

The first meeting place was at the City Hotel, corner of Broadway and Howard Street. In Mar 1853 it moved to the corner of Broadway and Bleecker Street, remaining here until the following May, when it moved to the corner of Broome and Crosby Streets, where it remained until May 1856, when it returned to the corner of Broadway and Bleecker Street. In May 1858 it again moved, this time to Odd Fellows’ Hall, corner of Grand and Centre Streets, remaining here until May 1873, when it moved into the German Savings Bank Building, on the corner of Fourth Avenue and Fourteenth Street.

In May 1874 it moved to the Masonic Hall on 23rd Street, remaining here four years, when it moved into the Steuben House, No. 295 Bowery. In May 1879 it moved into the Decker Building, No. 33 Union Square, where it remained until May 1881, when it returned to the Masonic Hall, where it remained until Mar 1888, when it moved to No. 170 East Sixtieth Street. In Dec 1890 it again returned to the Masonic Hall on 23rd Street. In Sep 1909 it moved into the Masonic Hall on 24th Street.

The Lodge was represented at the laying of the cornerstone of the Masonic Hall on 23rd Street; also at the laying of the cornerstone and dedication of the Home at Utica, NY.

Grand Lodge Officers

Isaac Hersch, Grand Steward Benno Loewy, Grand Representative

Masters


1851 William D. Benson

1852 James H. Lane

1853 James H. Lane

1854 Francis Sherlleau

1855 James H. Lane

1856 J. W. Leonard

1857 James Rosbotham

1858 Charles T. Smith

1859 James Rosbotham

1860 James H. Lane

1861 Hugh S. Gilbert

1862 William Jayton

1863 James A. Niedermeyer

1864 William Kayton

1865 William Kayton

1866 William Kayton

1867 William Kayton

1868 James A. Niedermeyer

1869 Michael Bondy

1870 James A. Niedermeyer

1871 Aaron Aarons

1872 Alexander Guthman

1873 Samuel Weil

1874 Samuel Weil

1875 Aaron Aarons

1876 James R. Canniff

1877 James R. Canniff

1878 Meyer Goodman

1879 Meyer Goodman

1880 William Kayton

1881 James L. Voorhees

1882 James L. Voorhees

1883 William Kayton

1884 Edgar Anthony

1885 James R. Canniff

1886 David Newmark

1887 David Newmark

1888 William Schlesinger

1889 Benjamin Van Leeuwen

1890 Benjamin Van Leeuwen

1891 Benjamin Van Leeuwen

1892 Henry Hill

1893 William C. Cornell

1894 Jacob Strauss

1895 Sarsten Heilshorn

1896 Raphael Rosenberger

1897 Max C. Baum

1898 Harry M. Levy

1899 Isaac Hersch

1900 Isaac Hersch

1901 Jacob Van Brink

1902 Emmanuel Jacobus

1903 Mark H. Rogers

1904 Marcus Brandt

1905 Benno Loewy

1906 Benjamin F. Feiner

1907 H. H. Opperheimer

1908 Harry M. Marks

1909 Maximiliam Zipkes

1910 Mark H. Ellison




Worth Lodge No. 210, New York City

Warrant: The warrant in possession of the Lodge is dated 4 Mar 1851

The name and number has never been changed.

Minutes: Not intact. All records from May 1891 to Jan 1895 are missing.



Worth Lodge was organized at the Keystone Hotel, corner of Division and Christie Streets 25 Dec 1850.

This name selected for the Lodge was “City,” but scarcely had the name been agreed upon when Henry C. Atwood, Grand Master of St. John’s Grand Lodge, was introduced. The minutes state that: “After a hearty interchange of sentiment and the utmost good feeling Brother Atwood expressed a wish to hear of some new Lodge having adopted the name of Worth; he then pictured in the most vivid manner some of the meritorious conduct of our lamented late Bro. Gen. W. J. Worth, of the US Army, and dwelt with great force on that portion which occurred before the Grand Lodge of the State of Mississippi, which was not only very instructive, but was listened to with the deepest interest and pleasure by all present.”
William J. Worth (1794-1849) Brevet Major General in War of 1812. b. 1 Mar 1794 in Hudson, NY. Was first employed in a store at Hudson and then moved to Albany, where he continued in the merchantile business until he was 18. Was commissioned in Mar 1813 as a 1st lieutenant of the 23rd Inf.; served as an aide to Gen. Winfield Scott. He distinguished himself at the Battle of Niagara and was made a major. At close of war he was superintendent of the U.S. Military Academy. In 1838 became colonel of 8th Inf. Served in Florida War, and was second in command to Gen. Zachary Taylor at opening of War with Mexico. He was first to plant with his own hand the flag of the U.S. on the Rio Grande. Distinguished himself in the Mexican War, and was in all battles from Vera Cruz to Mexico City. He was the first to enter Mexico City and cut down the Mexican flag from the National Palace with his own hands. He was known as the "most handsome man in the Army." Breveted major general for his service at Monterrey and given a sword, not only by the U.S. congress, but by the states of NY and LA, as well. Although he was buried Masonically and although Worth Lodge No. 210 of N.Y. is named for him, his Lodge is not known. d. 17 May 1849. The Grand Lodge of New York dedicated a memorial to him on 25 Nov 1857 in Madison Square Park.

At the northern end of Madison Square, on an island bordered by Broadway, Fifth Avenue and 25th Street, stands an obelisk, designed by James G. Batterson which was erected in 1857 over the tomb of General William Jenkins Worth, who served in the Seminole Wars and the Mexican War, and for whom Fort Worth, Texas was named, as well as Worth Street in lower Manhattan. The city's Parks Department designated the area immediately around the monument as a parklet called General Worth Square. Worth's monument was one of the first to be erected in a city park since the statue of George III was removed from Bpwling Green in 1776, and is the only monument in the city except for Grant’s Tomb that doubles as a mausoleum.



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_J._Worth


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