Foreword try out these riddles and see if you can answer the



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Mnemonic: One has CLAWS at the end of its PAWS and the other has a PAUSE at the end of its CLAUSE!

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES

INTERNET RESOURCES

1) Learn the mnemonic of the cat and the comma.

2) Underline the importance of the comma in punctuation.

3) To introduce punctuation work as being beneficial and fun-filled. Punctuation work is not a snore, a chore or a bore. It is a door to success.


1) TI: How to teach punctuation:

theguardian.com
It gives the best resources to teach punctuation on the web. Teachers share punctuation cards, rhymes, games etc. but you may have to register first.

MAIN LESSON

OTHER RESOURCES

1) Let students write down two reasons why the poor comma should be saved.

2) Give the mnemonic and assign time for them to learn it. This plays a crucial role in building their metacognitive skills.

3) Read through the rules on using a comma. Discuss the ‘Oxford comma’ and while it is not necessary to use it, it is good to be aware of it.

4) Let students attempt the 10 sentences for Rule No.4.

5) If time permits, access the Guardian website for extra exercises. Then recap on the rules of the comma and the lesson. Ask them to learn the rules of the comma if the students’ ability permits this. If not, ask them to learn the 3 you think are the most important.

6) Time can be assigned at the end of class to begin learning the rules of the comma.




1) Perhaps use newspapers, books etc. to locate commas in sentences. Then get the students to see which of the 5 basic rules of the comma that particular sentence is obeying.
2) Introduce a murder mystery game. Call the students ‘punctuation detectives’ and make a game of it. Tell them a murder has been committed, the murder of grammar in the English language, and only they can solve it!

2)


PLENARY/LEARNING OUTCOMES

HOMEWORK IF REQUIRED

1) Using mnemonics is a fun way of learning.

2) Learning the punctuation rules can be fun and is doesn’t have to be excessively rigorous or challenging.



3) Distilling complicated grammar rules down to their essence is best practice for children.

Learn some or all of the 5 comma rules.

OBSERVATIONS:

Date: __/__/__

Title: READING DAY

Lesson number: 36



AIMS AND OBJECTIVES

INTERNET RESOURCES

1)
2)


1)

MAIN LESSON

OTHER RESOURCES

1)
2)
3)
4)
5)


1)

PLENARY/LEARNING OUTCOMES

HOMEWORK IF REQUIRED

1)
2)




OBSERVATIONS:



Date: __/__/__

Title: ONOMATOPOEIA

Lesson number: 37

animal onomatopoeia sound motion

bear

growls

rooargh

shambles

bee

buzzes

biiiiiiiiz

surfs

bull

bellows

burooou

charges

cat

mewls

meeeow

pads

cow

lows

arrruuum

wanders

dog (big)

barks

rufffruff

clumps

donkey

brays

heeeaaaaw

trots

duck

quacks

grackgrack

waddles

elephant

trumpets

buurrrrrrrrr

lumbers

frog

croaks

ribbitribbit

leaps

magpie

chatters

kakkakkak

swoops

monkey

screams

ooohahahah

climbs

mouse

squeaks

weakweak

scurries

owl

hoots

toohootoohoo

ghosts

peregrine falcon

whines

waaaaaaaaaa

dive bombs

pig

grunts

hokkkhokkk

ambles

robin

carols

feekeekeefee

flits

raven

croaks

graawkgraawk

soars

serpent

hisses

sssssssssssssss

slithers

wolf

howls

owuuuuuuuuu

lopes

ACTION SOUND ACTION SOUND

a twig breaking

cracking

lightning in the sky

sissing

a badger moving

shuffling

a rodent running

skittering

a stream

gurgling

a flood river

roaring

a soft wind

sighing

a loud wind

keening

a squirrel running

sc­ampering

deer hooves

clopping

a jay on alert

screeching

a dragonfly’s wings

whirring

conkers falling

thunking

thunder in the sky

rumbling

a bees’ nest

droning

a lake rippling

ebbing

a small waterfall

cascading

a large waterfall

plummeting

a wildcat

slinking

a troll yelling in pain

yowling



AIMS AND OBJECTIVES

INTERNET RESOURCES

1) Embed definition/use of onomatopoeia.

1)

MAIN LESSON

OTHER RESOURCES

1) Let students recreate the animal sounds. They will want to make lots of noise and articulate the guttural and high pitched sounds in this class. Let them!

2) This is a great class for phonetics and an opportunity to coax shy children out of their self-imposed shells.



1) Write a story using 20 of the words above.

TI: 100 examples of onomatopoeia to:



noisehelp.com

PLENARY/LEARNING OUTCOMES

HOMEWORK IF REQUIRED

1) Onomatopoeia is fun!!!

Base homework on onomatopoeia

Date: __/__/__

Title: DESCRIBING A FOREST: 3rd GRID

Lesson number: 38

Definition: Fear the man of one book.

­­­­­­­­­­­Spelling revision

New words

Dictionary definitions, corrections, and synonyms.

onomatopoeia

gnarled




echoism

canopy




crinkly

tannin




rustling

almond




clacking

grove




guardians

hoary




pulsing

mystique






bark-brown

conker-brown

teak-brown

umber-brown

bamboo-brown

nut-brown

tannin-brown

almond-brown

a dome of trees

a moss veiled trail

gnarled trunks

a canopy of leaves

a leaf carpeted path

secret groves

hoary boughs

a leafy curtain

a glowing orb

a glinting halo

a blood moon

a Harvest moon

a gleaming globe

a glittering ring

a pagan moon

a Hunter’s moon

the owl light of dusk

placid rivers

moon-splashed trees

misty mystique of

chiming songbirds

sleek rivers

glimmering light

the lavish forest



AIMS AND OBJECTIVES

INTERNET RESOURCES

1) Keep students ‘on alert’ for their spellings-they should be revising them in study periods/free classes etc

1)

MAIN LESSON

OTHER RESOURCES

1) Give ‘sneak’ mental challenge on the spellings from the last two grids. It is not a test as they are sick of hearing that word from teachers all day and it has very negative connotations for them. The message here is that English is unique, fun and vibrant. They will always see the humour of you trying to pull the wool over their eyes with a ‘mental challenge’. In reality, it is a test but don’t ever, ever, ever admit it!

2) Let students attempt grids individually/in pairs/in teams.

3) Students look up dictionary words and meanings.

4) Recap with a discussion of the ‘magical words’ and how they might add to a story.



1) See back of this book for an extra lesson on ‘Describing the Moon’.

Taken from ‘Writing with Stardust’ and may be used as a supplementary aid for other classes also.



PLENARY/LEARNING OUTCOMES

HOMEWORK IF REQUIRED

1) Making students aware that ‘mental challenges’ are likely to be sprung on them. Ergo, spellings are to be learned with a long-term goal, not a short-term one.



OBSERVATIONS:

Date: __/__/__

Title: ACHIEVING SUCCESS IN LIFE

Lesson numbers: 39/40



AIMS AND OBJECTIVES

INTERNET RESOURCES

1) Is there a formula for success? Yes there is!

1)

MAIN LESSON

OTHER RESOURCES

Explain that all the formula for success is a simple one but it requires vision, planning, rigour and attention to detail. All successful people do most or all of these:
1) They believe in themselves more than others do.

2) They’ve a vision of what they are going to do in life.

3) They will form (and usually write down) a short, a medium and a long-term plan. Sometimes the micro-detail involved in this can shock their peers.

4) They will make everyday decisions that will bring them closer to achieving their vision.

5) They are prepared to work harder than anyone else to achieve this. They can mentally picture their competitors working and it spurs them on. They will never tire of ‘the process’ of this work even though it may seem repetitive and monotonous to others.

6) They will see failure as a short-term tactical loss in a long-term strategic game. It doesn’t deter them.

7) They will learn from these failures. Indeed, they will embrace them as merely another lesson learned.

8) They will keep a diary, journal or notebook in order to log successes, milestones and failures. Some will use it to keep looking back at what did and didn’t work.

9) They are prepared to embrace change as a friend, not an enemy. They learn to become as adaptable as they need to be.

10) Nothing, no-one, no circumstance will deter them. They are tenacious, enduring and confident in this one aspect of their lives. This can manifest in insecurity outside this environment sometimes.

A teacher’s role is to encourage them in their dreams. It is also to make sure that they understand that the visualisation, the planning and the working harder than anyone else part must be adhered to.

Helping them map a plan of goals towards their destination is giving them a gift. It may be just the platform they need, and you the voice, to start turning them from dreamers into achievers.



1) TI: Advice- Formula for success to:

drphil.com

It gives very concise and excellent advice on how to be successful. It also gives some ideas not covered by this book. Worth taking a look at for your senior classes also as it is advice for adults.

The key point of this lesson is to impart to them the key strategies in being successful. You can decide which of the formula on the left is appropriate to the language register and ability of your class. I tend to break it down into 5 key points for 11-12-year-olds:
1. Have a vision.

2. Have a plan to reach your vision.

3. Live it, act it and work towards it every day.

4. Work harder than anyone else and attack the process with zeal.

5. Use setbacks as a motivator and don’t leave others deter you.
The nail in my wall would no longer support the weight of the rejection slips impaled on it. I replaced the nail with a spike and kept on writing.”
Stephen King, the world’s most successful writer, at age 14.


PLENARY/LEARNING OUTCOMES

HOMEWORK IF REQUIRED

1) Giving them the gift of wisdom and explaining that wisdom, like success, is a carefully-built bridge, not an epiphany. It has to be learned and earned.



Date: __/__/__

Title: ACHIEVING SUCCESS IN LIFE

Lesson numbers: 39/40



AIMS AND OBJECTIVES

INTERNET RESOURCES

1) To implement a formula for success in life and the workplace over 2 class periods.

2) To introduce the concept that successful people share the same traits and mental processes.

3) To enable the students to map out a route to success by devising a plan to reach their goals.


1) TI: B2 Road Map to success to:

collegetools.berkeley.edu
It has a lesson plan made out with a wonderful success map to fill in and a questionnaire already done out for your students!

The document is in PDF.



MAIN LESSON

OTHER RESOURCES

1) Read the quote from William W. Purkey as a fun introduction to how life can be lived.

2) Read the first 3 points on achieving success and discuss the merits of them. It is perfectly fine for them to argue against these points. New ideas take time to ferment and organically grow.

3) Read points 4 and 5. Repeat Socratic method of arguing and reaching a common consensus.

4) Read points 6 and 7. Ask them to write down the most interesting or beneficial points and why they liked that particular one.

5) Ask the class if it is better to plan a road map to success or to simply drift like a log through life. If they think a plan is better, ask them if they should make out one in tomorrow’s class.


1) TI: Life Mapping: envision your success to:

martinamcgowan.com
It gives an interesting, extended metaphor on travelling to success and breaks down goal-setting into 5 easy steps.

PLENARY/LEARNING OUTCOMES

HOMEWORK IF REQUIRED

1) Enabling students to develop the ‘mind fitness’ needed for success.

2) Establishing that rigour is a crucial component of success.

3) Generate ideas how the practicalities of this formula can be applied immediately to their roles as students.


Ask them to write out their top 3 dream jobs in life (or 1 if they already know it). They must write out 5-10 ways they can improve in order to reach this goal: diet, sleep patterns, sports, hobbies, school subjects to focus on, improving their personality, making a planning road map, writing a diary/journal, points needed for college, saving money etc.

When it comes to the future, there are three kinds of people: those who let it happen, those who make it happen, and those who wonder what happened.”



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