First sentence and it must be your hook. Sentence two will be a bridging sentence



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Your intro paragraph must be formatted like this:

This will be your first sentence and it must be your hook. Sentence two will be a bridging sentence. Sentence three will be a bridging sentence. You may write a fourth bridging sentence if you want. Your final sentence will be your thesis.



See below for a description of your HOOK, BRIDGE, and THESIS

Your first sentence should be your HOOK.


Remember, in lesson 2.09 you learned about how to write a hook. On page 5 of lesson 2.09 you learned that your hook should be one of the following: Anecdote, Quotation, Definition, Description, Bold statement, Facts or Statistics. I’m including examples on the next page of each. Use one of these techniques to get your reader interested in your essay.

Your next two sentences should be your bridging sentences. Use bridging statements to connect your hook to your thesis. Bridging statements are sentences that provide supporting details. These details help your reader understand how the hook relates to the central idea of the paper.

The last sentence of your intro should be your thesis statement.
Your thesis MUST respond to the prompt. Based on your research, identify and analyze a human rights issue in your novel and show how it relates to real-life issues and affects people within the United States and one other country.

An example of how this might be written if you were reading The Hunger Games:


Suzanne Collins’ novel The Hunger Games illustrates the real-life problem of governments and people around the world who turn a blind eye to poverty in favor of maintaining their own wealth and consumerism.
This statement identifies the book that is being read, explains the Human Rights issue in the book and how it relates to countries around the world.

An easier way to write your thesis is by simply filling in the blanks:


FILL THIS IN TO MAKE YOUR THESIS:

The novel ____________ demonstrates the real world problem of ______________.



Below a description of each type of HOOK:

Anecdote: A very short story that illustrates some aspect of your essay's topic can help your reader connect to your topic.

Example: Terri could not stop grinning. Her parents noticed a change in her attitude, and her grades improved. After years of trying out for this sport or that team, she had found her place in the band. She had made friends for what felt like the first time in her life.

Quotation: A saying or quotation that ties into your essay's topic can be thought-provoking for your reader.

Example: Psychiatrist William Glasser showed how important belonging is when he said, "We are driven by five genetic needs: survival, love and belonging, power, freedom, and fun."

Definition: A fresh or unusual way of defining the topic of your essay can cause your reader to keep reading. Do not use dictionary definitions as a hook.

Example: Equality is a warm quilt wrapped around you on a cold day; it is something everyone needs to experience.

Description : A vivid description of some aspect of your essay's topic can get your readers' attention; appeal to as many of the senses as possible to create a powerful image that will keep them reading.

Example: An elderly man sits in a wheelchair staring at the cold, white walls of his nursing home room. A young child sits, nervously tapping his foot and chewing his nails, as his social worker looks for a new family for him. These two individuals are alone in a world that seems dark, cold, and hopeless.

Bold statement : A surprising or shocking statement connected to the topic of your essay causes your reader to keep reading to find out if the statement is true or how it connects to your topic.

Example: People who need others to fight for them to have equal rights are weak.

Facts or Statistics: A surprising fact or statistic pertaining to your essay's topic can draw your reader into your essay.

Example: Many people do not know that the depression rate among middle-aged men is 40 percent; gender stereotypes result in missed diagnoses.

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