Feet First – Walk to School Every Week



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Feet First – Walk to School Every Week

Values:

Key Competencies:

Key Understanding:


Driving Question:

Subsidiary Questions:

T1: Walking and road safety

T2: Walking and exploring

T3: Walking and creating

T4: Walking and helping the planet


Excellence

Innovation

Diversity

Equity


Community and Participation

Ecological Sustainability

Integrity

Respect


Thinking

Managing self

Participating and contributing

Relating to others

Making meaning from language, symbols and text


Walking benefits people, places and the planet.


Walking: what difference can I make?

1. Define ‘walking’.
2. Explain the benefits of walking.

3. Predict how using sustainable transport such as walking might improve people, places and the planet. 



Curriculum Learning Area:

Achievement Objectives:




Curriculum Level: 1 2 3 4 5

Learning Intentions:










Social Sciences

Unuhia te rito o te harakeke kei whea te komako e ko?

Whakatairangitia – rere ki uta, rere ki tai;

Ui mai koe ki ahau he aha te mea nui o te ao,

Maku e ki atu he tangata, he tangata, he tangata!

In the social sciences, students explore how societies work and how they themselves can participate and take action as critical, informed, and responsible citizens.



Select the achievement objectives that best match the abilities of your students.

Social Studies

Level One

Understand how belonging to groups is important for people.

Understand how the past is important to people.

Level Two

Understand how people make choices to meet their needs and wants.

Understand how time and change affect people’s lives.

Level Three

Understand how people make decisions about access to and use of resources.



Level Four

Understand how people participate individually and collectively in response to community challenges.



Level Five

Understand that people move between places and how this has consequences for the people and the places.




Schools will have their own criteria for developing learning intentions. Examples are included below. Highlight the learning intention/s that best match the abilities of your students. Write your WALTs from these.

Define ‘group’.

Describe how people belong in groups.

Explain why people belong to groups.

Define ‘choice’.

Describe how people make choices.

Explain why people make choices.

Define ‘needs’ and ‘wants’.

Define ‘past’.

Define ‘present’.

Describe the past.

Describe how the past is important to people.

Explain why the past is important to people.

Explain how time and change affect people’s lives.

Describe how people make decisions about access to and use of resources.

Explain why people make decisions about access to and use of resources.

Identify a range of community challenges.

Describe how people participate as individuals in response to community challenges.

Describe how people participate collectively in response to community challenges.

Explain why people participate in response to community challenges.

Define ‘travel’.

Describe how people travel between places in our local area in the present.

Describe how people travelled between places in our local area in the past.

Describe the consequences of people’s travel on [people/places/Planet Earth].

Classify the ways people travel between places in our local area in the present.

Classify the ways people travelled between places in our local area in the past.

Compare and contrast the way people travelled between places in the past with the way they travel between places in the present.

Explain the causes and consequences of the way people travel between places in our local area today.

Explain the causes and consequences of the way people travelled between places in our local area in the past.

Explain the consequences of people’s travel on [people/places/Planet Earth].

Analyse travel between places in our local area in the present.

Analyse travel between places in our local area in the past.

Describe the impact on [people/places/Planet Earth] of travel between places in the present.

Describe the impact on [people/places/Planet Earth] of travel in the past.

Compare and contrast the way people travel between places in our local area today with the way they travelled in the past.

Compare and contrast the impact on [people/places/Planet Earth] of travel between places in the past with travel in the present.

Evaluate the impact of travel between places on [people/places/Planet Earth].

Evaluate our individual response to the impact of the way we travel on Planet Earth.

Evaluate our collective response to the impact of the way we travel on Planet Earth.


Learning Experiences:


Select the learning experiences that best meet the learning intentions and achievement objectives that match your students’ abilities.

Understanding how people choose/decide to travel and helping Planet Earth

Define ‘group’. For help finding out what a word means, you can use Google’s define feature. For example, type ‘define: group’ into the search box and press enter. For help finding web page content that is more suited to children, add ‘for children’ to your search term. For example, type ‘group for children’ into the search box and press enter.

List groups in your local community, school and class.

Describe a travel group in your local community, e.g. a local walkers’ group, walking school bus, a walking for fitness group.

Describe how people belong in groups.

Explain why people belong to groups.

Define ‘individual’.

Define ‘community’.

Describe your local neighbourhood community. For example, locate the streets in your local neighbourhood and the homes of the people in your class community on a neighbourhood map. Can you identify the people who live in the other places on your neighbourhood map?

Define ‘local environment’.

Define ‘travel’. For example, travel is to go from one place to another. For help finding out what a word means, you can use Google’s define feature. For example, type ‘define: travel’ into the search box and press enter. For help finding web page content that is more suited to children, add ‘for children’ to your search term. For example, type ‘travel for children’ into the search box and press enter.

Define ‘choice’.

List the choices you have made since waking up this morning.

Describe how people make choices. List the travel choices available when you travel to school each day. Describe the process your family goes through in making the travel choice.

Explain why people make choices. For example, what influences your choices of how to travel to school?

Define ‘needs’ and ‘wants’.

Describe your needs and wants since waking up this morning.

Describe your needs and wants for travelling to school.

Define ‘past’.

Define ‘present’.

Describe the past. For example, describe travel choices in the past.

Describe how the past is important to people.

Explain why the past is important to people.

Explain how time and change affect people’s lives.

Describe how people make decisions about access to and use of resources. For example, describe how your family makes decisions about access to and use of resources for travelling to school or work each day.

Explain why people make decisions about access to and use of resources. For example, describe why your family makes the decisions it does about access to and use of resources for travelling to school or work each day.



Travel in the past

Define ‘travel’. For example, travel is to go from one place to another. For help finding out what a word means, you can use Google’s define feature. For example, type ‘define: travel’ into the search box and press enter. For help finding web page content that is more suited to children, add ‘for children’ to your search term. For example, type ‘travel for children’ into the search box and press enter.

Identify the ways people travelled in your local area in the past.

Read stories and accounts describing the travel of people in New Zealand in the past.

View the photographic resources in Sustainable Future: Looking Backwards Conversations slideshow of images from New Zealand’s past.

View photographs and drawings of people travelling in New Zealand’s past.

View YouTube: Sidewalk Memories about a group of older people reminiscing about their childhood growing up in a local community in Boston.

Search Matapihi for images and drawings of New Zealand travel in the past.

Use See, Think, Wonder to look at photographs and drawings of people travelling in the past. For example, in ‘See:’ search for evidence in the photograph. Describe the detail of what you can see in the photograph. In ‘Think:’ form a theory about what you see in the photograph. Compare and contrast what you can see in the photograph with other photographs from the same/different locality or time. In ‘Wonder:’ make generalisations or draw conclusion from what you have seen and thought about in the travel photographs and drawings.

Describe the ways people travelled in your local area the past, e.g. walking, horseback, waka.

Interview local people to find out their memories of how and where people travelled in your local area in the past. For example many present-day walking tracks in New Zealand were created in the past by Māori transporting greenstone, or by gold miners, gum diggers or deer cullers.

Refer to:



Te Ara Walking Tracks Description of walking tracks across New Zealand

Te Ara: Maori Highways Description of early walking tracks across New Zealand and why they were created.

Interview an older member of your local community about how they travelled each week when they were a similar age to you.

Describe how people made decisions about access to and use of resources in the past. For example, describe how people made decisions about access to and use of resources for travelling to visit the beach.

Classify the ways people travelled in your local area in the past. For example, sort images of people travelling in the past into categories. Explain why you have chosen the categories.

Explain the causes and consequences of the way people travelled in your local area in the past.

Explain why people make decisions about access to and use of resources. For example, describe why people made the decisions about access to and use of resources for travelling in your local area in the past.

Explain why people chose to travel on horseback, cart, tram, train etc.

Analyse travel in your local area in the past. For example, identify the significant requirements for travel in the past. Explain what would happen if one of these requirements was missing. Generalise the function of that requirement to travel in the past.



Travel today

Identify the ways people travel in your local area today.

Read stories and accounts describing the travel of people in New Zealand today.

View photographs and drawings of people travelling in New Zealand today.

Search the Flickr Creative commons online photo library for images and drawings of New Zealand travel today. Refer to Flickr Online Photo Library or transport around the world, Flickr Creative Commons: Transport

Use See, Think, Wonder to look at photographs and drawings of people travelling today. In ‘See:’ search for evidence in the photograph. Describe the detail of what you can see in the photograph. In ‘Think:’ form a theory about what you see in the photograph. Compare and contrast what you can see in the photograph with other photographs from the same/different locality or time. In ‘Wonder:’ make generalisations or draw conclusion from what you have seen and thought about in the travel photographs and drawings.

View travel methods used on New Zealand roads. Refer Transit New Zealand: Webcams for webcams in Auckland, Wellington, Tauranga and Christchurch.

Watch YouTube videos on travel, transport and traffic in New Zealand. For example:



YouTube: Auckland City of Cars Episode 1

YouTube: Auckland City of Cars Episode 2

YouTube: Auckland City of Cars Episode 3

YouTube: North Shore Busway News item about a bus lane on Auckland’s North Shore.

Describe the ways people travel in your local area in the present, e.g. car, bus, train, plane, ferry, helicopter, walking, skateboarding, biking, motorbike.

Interview your local community about how they travel from place to place each week.

Keep a travel diary that details all the ways and distances you travel from place to place in a week.

Describe how New Zealanders travel today, e.g. walking for travel.

Compare and contrast your travel diary with the diaries of others in the class.

Compare and contrast local travel patterns with national travel patterns.

Interview an older member of your local community about how they travelled each week when they were a similar age to you.

Classify the ways people travel in your local area in the present. For example, sort images of people travelling in the present into categories. Explain why you have chosen the categories.

Classify the ways people travel nationally. For example, sort images of people travelling in the present into categories. Explain why you have chosen the categories.

Create a timeline for the introduction of different ways of travel.

Explain why people choose to travel by car.

Explain why people choose to travel by walking or biking.

Compare and contrast the way young people travel in your local area today with the way older people travel.

Explain the causes and consequences of any similarities and differences you identify.

Compare and contrast the way people travel in your local area today with the way people travelled in the past.

Explain the causes and consequences of any similarities and differences you identify.

Explain the causes and consequences of the way older people travel in your local area.

Explain the causes and consequences of the way people travel in your local area today.

Analyse travel in your local area in the present. For example, identify the significant requirements for travel today. Explain what would happen if one of these requirements was missing. Generalise the function of that requirement to travel today.



Community challenge: the impact of travel

Describe the impact on Planet Earth of travel in the present, e.g. the effects of burning fossil fuels when travelling by car on air quality and climate, the impact of road and motorway construction on places and environments, the effects of off road recreational vehicles and mountain biking on fragile environments and endangered species.

Describe the impact on Planet Earth of travel in the past.

Compare and contrast the impact on Planet Earth of travel by the young and travel by elderly people.

Compare and contrast the impact on Planet Earth of travel in the past and travel in the present.

People can walk 2 kilometres in half an hour. Explain why people choose to use their car for trips of under 2 kilometres.

Evaluate the impact of travel on Planet Earth.

Identify the response of individuals to the impact of the way we travel to school on Planet Earth. For example, design and implement a survey of your local community to find out how much they know and care about the impact of the way we travel on Planet Earth.

Identify our collective response (locally or nationally) to the impact of the way we travel on Planet Earth, e.g., cycle tracks, speed cameras, bus passes, bus lanes, park and ride places, inner city car parks, taxis, pedestrian crossings, speed humps, roundabouts, traffic lights, double yellow lines, motorways, bypasses, pedestrian overpasses, wheel clamps, tow trucks, walking school buses, vehicle rating sites, fuel efficiency publicity, alternative fuels.

Identify the immediate, medium-term and long-term advantages to the individual in making travel decisions without regard to their impact on Planet Earth.

Identify the immediate, medium-term and long-term disadvantages to the individual in making travel decisions without regard to their impact on Planet Earth.

Classify the actions taken to reduce the impact of the way we travel on Planet Earth into actions taken by government, action taken by local authorities, action taken by businesses, actions taken by schools and actions taken by individuals.

Analyse our individual response to the impact of the way we travel to school on Planet Earth in terms of individual advantage and collective responsibility. Refer Science Magazine: The Tragedy of the Commons for an essay and responses about shared resources, individual advantage and collective responsibility.

Analyse our collective response to the impact of the way we travel to school on Planet Earth in terms of individual advantage and collective responsibility.

Evaluate our individual response to the impact of the way we travel to school on Planet Earth.

Evaluate our collective response to the impact of the way we travel to school on Planet Earth.

How do you think individuals will choose to travel to school in the future?

Predict how we will respond (collective response) to travel in the future. For example, how will your local community choose to travel to and from work and school in the future?



Travel between places: The consequences for people, places and the planet.

Read:


National Geographic – Human Migration Guide Resources for studying human migration

Taking IT Global - Migration TIG resource on Migration – including Organisations, Publications, Blogs, Policies, Statistics

Taking IT Global – Refugee TIG resource on Migration – including Organisations, Publications, Blogs, Policies, Statistics.

Create a glossary of terms related to migration and refugees.

Identify and describe a voluntary movement of people between place A and place B, e.g. migration of people from the Pacific Islands to New Zealand, from Mexico to the United States, from Eastern Europe to Israel and the United States, or from India to Pakistan.

Identify and describe an involuntary movement of people between place A and place B, e.g. migration of people escaping physical danger such as Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans or the Bhopal disaster in India, migration as a result of state intervention or conflict such as the Indonesian annexation of East Timor, or migration as a result of state development such as during the Three Gorges Dam development in China.

Describe the factors pushing people away from a place.

Describe the factors pulling people towards another place.

Read Refugee Boy by Benjamin Zephania, the story of an African boy sent to England to escape the violent civil war in Ethiopia.

Play Against All Odds, an interactive online game from the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR ), in which you experience what it is like to be a refugee.

Set up a class ‘mind movie’ in which a young person is fleeing place A with the likelihood they will not be able to return. Ask students to close their eyes and listen to a real life account of a young person caught in civil unrest (or a natural disaster) which will require them to flee their home on foot. When the scenario finishes, students should keep their eyes closed and ‘keep the movie running’.

Ask them to imagine, ‘What happens next?’ Ask students to share their imaginings with a partner and then collect feedback on how their imaginings were similar and different. Get students to place these imaginings on a timeline and to use this record to write their own account of what happened next.

Alternatively ask them to imagine, ‘What would you take with you?’ Ask students to share their imaginings with a partner and then collect feedback on how their imaginings were similar and different. Get students to describe five things they would take with them. Students should categorise whether these things will be useful in the short term or the long term and explain why these things would be important to their survival.

Identify a movement of people from place A to place B where the primary mode of travel was walking, e.g. Somali refugees walking to Kenya.

Refer to:

Forced Migration Online Resources relating to refugees and forced migration

UNHCR United Nations Refugee Agency Resources from the UN Refugee Agency

Global Dimensions, a range of organised and easily searchable teaching resources for a diversity of global topics.

British Red Cross Positive Images Toolkit An educational resource to teach young people about migration and development.

Describe the movement of people from place A to place B.

List the causes of the movement of people from place A to place B. Classify these causes into push and pull factors.

Describe the factors pushing people away from place A.

Describe the factors pulling people towards place B.

Explain reasons (causes) for this movement of people – include push reasons and pull reasons. Why do people move from place A to place B? What are the values and perspectives of the people who move from place A to place B?

List the effects of the movement of people from place A to place B. Classify these effects into effects on the people moving from place A, effects on the people left behind in place A and effects on the people already living in place B.

Describe the effects of the move on the people moving.

Describe the effects of the move on the place left behind.

Describe the effects of the move on the people left behind.

Describe the effects of the move on the place where people are moving to.

Describe the effects of the move on the people already living in place B.

Explain the consequences (effects) of the movement of people for the people left behind. What was the human response of the people left behind? What strategies did they adopt?

Explain the consequences of the movement of people for the place they left. What was the human response? What strategies did the people in the place left adopt?

Explain the consequences of the movement of people for the place they moved to. What was the human response? What strategies did the people already in the place adopt?

Explain the consequences of the movement of people for the people moving. What was the human response of the people who moved from place A to place B? What strategies did they adopt?

Explain the consequences of the movement of people for the people in the place others are moving to. What was the human response of the people in place B to the new arrivals? What strategies did they adopt?

Evaluate the consequences of the movement of people from place A to place B. What impact do the people moving have on the communities they move into and the communities they leave behind? What strategies does each of those communities adopt?

Justify the human response to the movement of people from place A to place B. Why were these strategies used?

Reflect on how this learning is significant for you and others. What might you do about it? What response can you make to the movement of people from place A to place B?



Make a decision or take an action in response to your new learning about the movement of people by walking from place A to place B.

If you would like to share your work we are encouraging schools to attach a blog to the map pin – and place your work on this.

If you would like to have your work aggregated and shared on the site please send it to Feetfirst@nzta.govt.nz


Assessment: Learning Area: Social Science

Assessment: Key Competency

Thinking

An example assessment rubric is included. Insert your own marking guide on the left hand side.




I can identify several relevant similarities and differences between travel today and travel in the past, explain why, and make a generalisation about travel.




I can identify several relevant similarities and differences between travel today and travel in the past and explain why.




I can identify several relevant similarities and differences between travel today and travel in the past.




I can identify one relevant similarity or difference between travel today and travel in the past.




I need help to compare travel today with travel in the past.



An example assessment rubric is included. Insert your own marking guide on the left hand side.




I can give several relevant reasons for a choice I have made, and use valid and reliable information to explain why these reasons are relevant.




I can give several relevant reasons for a choice I have made, and use reliable information to explain why these reasons are relevant.




I can give several relevant reasons for a choice I have made.





I can give one relevant reason for a choice I have made.





I need help to explain a choice I have made.




ICT Resources:

Thinking Resources:

What if Questions:

Inquiry Scenario:

These are suggested ICTs that will support the bringing in of ideas, the connecting of ideas, and putting ideas into another context.

New Zealand Curriculum: TKI: Social Studies Exemplars Student exemplars for curriculum learning area Social Studies.

Social Studies Online New Zealand online learning community for teachers of Social Studies.

Matapihi New Zealand archive, library and museum database for images, sounds and objects.

Sustainable Future: Looking Backwards Conversations Slideshow of images from New Zealand’s past.

Te Ara: Walking Tracks Description of walking tracks across New Zealand.

Te Ara: Maori Highways Description or early walking tracks across New Zealand and why they were created.

Flickr Online Photo Library

Transit New Zealand webcams Webcam traffic views from Auckland, Tauranga, Christchurch and Wellington.

YouTube: Auckland City of Cars Episode 1 YouTube video about car traffic in Auckland Part 1.

YouTube: Auckland City of Cars Episode 2 YouTube video about car traffic in Auckland Part 2.

YouTube: Auckland City of Cars Episode 3 YouTube video about car traffic in Auckland Part 3.



YouTube: North Shore Busway News item about a bus lane on Auckland’s North Shore.

Science Magazine: The Tragedy of the Commons Science magazine tragedy of the commons essay and responses.

National Geographic – Human Migration Guide Resources for studying human migration.

Forced Migration Online Resources relating to refugees and forced migration.

Te Ara – Refugees History of refugees in New Zealand.

Refugees – Who Are They and Where Do They Come From? A Ministry of Health publication on refugees in New Zealand.

Other ICT resources are available in the Feet First ICT Resource.



These are suggested thinking frameworks based on a range of strategies.

Complete a PMI on providing car parking space for private cars outside of schools.

Compare and contrast traffic flow in Auckland with traffic flow in Tauranga.

Make an analogy between a motorway and email.

Predict the consequences of making people keep their car lights on when they park in public places.

Invent a way to make it easier for parents to walk their children to school before going to work each day.



Use these for class/group discussion or writing.

What if an important qualification for appointment to the highest-paying jobs in the country was a history of walking to work?

What if the use of private cars was banned on school days?

What if there was a free minibus service that travelled around the school zone before and after school?

What if you could pass exams with the stuff you learned when walking to school?

What if the sounds you heard when walking to school were found to build intelligence to a more significant level than the sounds heard when travelling by car?



Term 4: Walking and helping the planet

For Term 4 the student-led inquiry Sustainability is based on walking and exploring in, local, national and global contexts.

Inquiry contexts include:

What is most valuable to you?

Building

Carrying things

Cooking

Climate change

Energy

Food


Rubbish disposal

Transport



Water

Or select your own inquiry.



Term 4: Walking and Helping the Planet Inquiry

Refer: Ministry of Education. (2007). The New Zealand Curriculum for English-medium teaching and learning in years 1–13. Wellington: Learning Media.



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