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Foundations in Gender Studies (I)

Fall 2016 4.0 Credits
Dr. Sara Meger

Assistant Professor

Department of Gender Studies

Central European University

Z14, Room 513

megers@ceu.edu


Office Hours: Mondays & Wednesdays, 2pm-4pm or by appointment
Course Description:

This is an introductory course which is designed to familiarize students with some of the basic concepts and arguments in the broad interdisciplinary field of “gender studies.” The first part of the course will address the notions of sex and gender in an effort to introduce students to the variety of ways in which, throughout the past decades, thinking about these issues has changed. In the second part of the course we’ll explore several different types of argumentations on the meaning of gender, the woman question and women’s emancipation. We’ll follow a historical path and review liberal/neo-liberal, socialist/Marxist, radical, post-colonial/post-socialist views, and third-wave feminism. We’ll identify the key trends in each set of arguments and try to follow how they got transformed as they traveled to different locations and through time.


Learning Objectives

  • To clarify the theoretical traditions of feminist thought and key concepts that have informed feminist theory through history, paying special attention to the way these ideas have been conceptualized differently and revised in different historical and cultural contexts.

  • To highlight the distinct debates and concepts, placing them in historical and cultural contexts.

  • To sensitize students to the ways that sexual politics and gendered power relations have been constructed within particular historical social contexts, and thus must be understood in relation to other important categories such as race, class, ethnicity, national context, and others.


Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course, students should:



  • Have a solid grasp of the major theoretical streams that have defined feminist theory and formed the basis of women’s studies and (more recently) gender studies.

  • Historicize and contextualize, and then work with basic concepts like “sex” “gender” “patriarchy” “intersectionality”

  • Gain experience in critically reading primary texts that have been foundational to the development of feminist and gender theory, and sharpen their facilities for critical writing and oral analysis.

Class Format

Mondays, 11:00am – 12:40pm, FT 409

Wednesdays, 11:00am – 12:40pm, Z 411/A

2x 1.5 hour sessions per week. Generally, the first 30-45 minutes will comprise of a lecture on that day’s topic. The second half will comprise student discussion and smaller group exercises. You are expected to come to class prepared with questions and comments related to the readings.



Assessment and Grading

As a theory survey course, this class will not be assessed based on research. Your grade will comprise of the following elements:



  • Active participation in class, demonstrating your familiarity with the assigned materials: 20%

  • Midterm consisting of 3-4 questions that ask students to critically review/compare readings to demonstrate level of comprehension and ability to situate a text within broader debates: 30%

  • Final exam consisting of 50% short answer, comprehension questions and 50% one essay-length response to a pre-determined question that would have students seek to synthesize literatures and offer a critical argument/analysis in response: 50%

Both the midterm and final examinations will be administered as ‘take home’ exams. The due dates are non-negotiable. Students will receive the questions 1 week in advance of the due date and must submit their responses in hard copy to myself or the Gender Studies office before 5:00pm on the date it is due.


Deadlines are:

Friday, 4 November, 5pm: midterm exam

Wednesday, 14 December, 5pm: final exam

Class Expectations

This class is run as a graduate seminar and as such will require on the active participation of all students for its success. This means you must come to class having read all of the assigned readings and prepared to share your critical reflections and analysis.


Regular attendance is a major component of the program and is therefore mandatory in all classes. Only illness or serious unavoidable matters are considered valid excuses for missing class. In cases of prolonged absence due to such serious obstacles, the department may arrange for extensions on assignments, temporary withdrawal, or other solutions that will allow the student to complete the program within the parameters of our requirements.
Tardiness is not acceptable; if you are more than 15 minutes late to class, it will count as an absence. If you are consistently late, this will affect your participation grade as well.
While attendance is mandatory, in general, there is no need to contact me to “excuse” your absence. If you are absent more than twice during the term for medical or other personal reasons, then please keep me informed. I expect that everyone will have once or twice in the semester when they cannot come due to sickness or an important appointment. Two or fewer absences will not affect your participation grade. Missing more than two classes without advance notice and documentation provided to the professor will in most cases affect your participation grade.
Students are expected to consult the e-Learning site regularly for messages, assignments, and updates to the course. If you would like to reach me, the best way is to attend my regularly scheduled office hours. Outside of this time, I am contactable through email. However, please understand that I will not necessarily respond immediately to emails, and will not respond on weekends/holidays. In most cases, you can a response to emails within 48 hours.
Mobile Phones and Laptops: Please be sure that your mobile phones are silenced before coming to class. Text messaging during class will not be tolerated. Use of laptops for any purpose other than note-taking is not acceptable. Persons using electronic devices inappropriately during class will be asked to leave. The use of electronic devices in any manner that distracts from classroom activities will not be tolerated and will detrimentally affect your participation grade.

Writing Guidelines

Written assignments must be typed in a 12-point standard font, as well as double-spaced and with page numbers inserted. You must also title your paper. Only hard copy submissions will be accepted. Please print double-sided. Provide full references and be sure to avoid plagiarism. APA and Chicago are both acceptable modes of citation. You may find the guidelines for these, as well as other helpful formatting rules, at the Purdue Owl (https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/).


Plagiarism is a serious offence. Cases of academic dishonesty will be evaluated for severity and may result in a referral to the Committee on Academic Dishonesty. Punishment for offences of academic dishonesty, including ‘mild plagiarism’, will be administered as per CEU Guidelines on Handling Cases of Plagiarism (http://archive.ceu.hu/sites/default/files/official_policies/Guidelines%20on%20Handling%20Cases%20of%20Plagiarism%20G-1009-1.pdf). Students should consult myself or the Centre for Academic Writing if they are unclear about the difference between appropriate citation and plagiarism.

Class Schedule (Topics, Readings, and Assignments)
Week 1 September 19-25

Seminar 1: Introduction to Foundations I

Marilyn Frye, “The Possibility of Feminist Theory” in Alison Jaggar and Paula S. Rothenberg (eds.) 1993. Feminist Frameworks: Alternative Theoretical Accounts of the Relations Between Women and Men. Boston MA: McGraw Hill.


Seminar 2: Background to the Emergence of Feminism

John Stuart Mill. Excerpts from The Subjection of Women (1869). in Alison Jaggar and Paula S. Rothenberg (eds.) 1993. Feminist Frameworks: Alternative Theoretical Accounts of the Relations Between Women and Men. Boston MA: McGraw Hill.

Mary Wollstonecraft, Vindication of the Rights of Women, 65-155.

Sojourner Truth, 1851, “Ain’t I a Woman?” Delivered at the Women's Convention in Akron, Ohio, 28-29 May 1851.




Further Readings:

Gilman, Charlotte Perkins. The Yellow Wallpaper. 1892.


Grimke, Angelina. "Human Rights Not Founded on Sex." In Letters to Catherine Beecher. Isaac Knapp, 1838.

Week 2 September 26-Oct 2



Seminar 3: The Anti-Slavery Movement

Davis, Angela. "The Anti-Slavery Movement and the Birth of Women's Rights." Chapter 2 in Women, Race and Class. New York, NY: Vintage Books, 1983, pp. 30-45.


Anna Julia Cooper, in May Wright Sewell, ed., The World’s Congress of Representative Women (Chicago: Rand, McNally, 1894), pp. 711-15. http://www.blackpast.org/1893-anna-julia-cooper-womens-cause-one-and-universal#sthash.Cfh8MBg7.dpuf

Further Reading

Offen, K. “How (and Why) the Analogy of Marriage with Slavery Provided the Springboard for Women’s Rights Demands in France, 1640-1848,” in Women’s Rights and Transatlantic Antislavery in the Era of Emancipation, ed. Kathryn Kish Sklar & James Brewer Stewart. (New Haven:Yale University Press, 2007), pp. 57-81.



Seminar 4: Liberal Feminism

Rosemarie Tong. 1993. “Liberal Feminism” Chapter One in Feminist Thought: A Comprehensive Introduction. London: Routledge. Pp. 11-38.


Grimke, Angelina. "Human Rights Not Founded on Sex." In Letters to Catherine Beecher. Isaac Knapp, 1838.

Stanton, Elizabeth Cady. "The Solitude of Self." (PDF) Woman's Journal, January 23, 1892.


Further Readings

Zillah Eisenstein, 1993. The Radical Future of Liberal Feminism. Boston: Northeastern University Press.


Susan Wendell, 1987, “A (Qualified) Defense of Liberal Feminism,” Hypatia 2(2): 65-93.

Week 3 October 3-9



Seminar 5: 19th Century Marxism and Women

Alexandra Kollontai 1909, “The Social Basis of the Woman Question.” Selected Writing of Alexandra Kollontai, 1977. Allison & Busby. Available at: https://www.marxists.org/archive/kollonta/1909/social-basis.htm.


Friedrich Engels, excerpts from Origin of the Family, Private Property, and the State. in Alison M. Jaggar and Paula S. Rothenberg (eds.), Feminist Frameworks: Alternative Theoretical Accounts of the Relations Between Women and Men, 3rd Edition.Boston, MA: McGraw Hill.

Further Readings

August Bebel, 1979. Woman and Socialism. Trans. By Meta L. Stern. New York: Socialist Literature Co. Available from: https://www.marxists.org/archive/bebel/1879/woman-socialism/index.htm?utm_source=lasindias.info




Seminar 6: Politics of the Early 20th Century and Women

Simone De Beauvoir, 2008, “Introduction to The Second Sex,” Translated and edited by H.M. Parshley, in Alison Bailey and Chris Cuomo (eds.), The Feminist Philosophy Reader. Boston: McGraw Hill.


Mary Ziegler, 2008, “Eugenic Feminism: Mental Hygiene, the Women’s Movement, and the Campaign for Eugenic Legal Reform, 1900-1935.” Harvard Journal of Law & Gender 311): 211-235.


Further Readings

Clare Makepeace, 2009, “To What Extent was the Relationship between Feminists and the Eugenics Movement a ‘Marriage of Convenience’ in the Interwar Years?” Journal of International Women’s Studies 11(3): 66-80.


Leila Rupp, 1977, “Mother of the ‘Volk’: The Image of Women in Nazi Ideology,” Signs 3(2): 362-379.
Angela Davis, 1982, “Racism, Birth Control and Reproductive Rights,” in Angela Davis, Women, Race and Class, London: The Women’s Press.

Week 4 October 10-16



Seminar 7: 20th Century Liberal Feminism

Friedan, Betty. "The Problem That Has No Name." In The Feminine Mystique. W. W. Norton & Company, 2013 (reprinted from the 1963 edition).


Arlie Hochschild, 1989. “Marriage in a Stalled Revolution,” in The Second Shift: Working Families and the Revolution at Home. London: Penguin Books.

Further Readings

Susan Moller Okin. 1999. “Justice, Gender and the Family” pp. 313-331, in Janet Kourany, James P. Sterba, and Rosemary Tong (eds.). Feminist Philosophies (2nd edition). Prentice Hall.

National Organization for Women (NOW), 1967, “Bill of Rights,” in Alison Jaggar and Paula S. Rothenberg (eds.) 1993. Feminist Frameworks: Alternative Theoretical Accounts of the Relations Between Women and Men. Boston MA: McGraw Hill.
Seminar 8: 20th Century Socialist Feminism

Heidi Hartmann. 1981. “The Unhappy Marriage of Marxism and Feminism. Towards a More Progressive Union,” pp. 97-122, reprinted in Linda Nicholson ed. (1997) The Second Wave. A Reader in Feminist Theory. New York and London: Routledge.


Maria Mies, 1986, “Social Origins of the Sexual Division of Labour,” in Patriarchy and Accumulation on a World Scale. London: Zed Books.

Further readings:

Nancy Hartsock, 1995, ‘The Feminist Standpoint: Developing the Ground for a Specifically Feminist Historical Materialism,’ in in Nancy Tuana and Rosemarie Tong (eds.), Feminism & Philosophy: Essential Readings in Theory, Reinterpretation, and Application. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.


Monique Wittig, “One is Not Born a Woman,” in Alison Jaggar and Paula S. Rothenberg (eds.) 1993. Feminist Frameworks: Alternative Theoretical Accounts of the Relations Between Women and Men. Boston MA: McGraw Hill.
Sylvia Federici The Caliban and the Witch.
Zimmermann, Susan. “Gender Regime and Gender Struggle in Hungarian State Socialism,” Aspasia: International Yearbook for Women’s and Gender History of Central Eastern and Southeastern Europe 4, 1 (2010): 1-24.
Goldman, W.Z. 1991. “Working-Class Women and the “Withering Away” of the Family: Popular Responses to Family Policy,” in: Fitzpatrick, S., Rabinowitch, A. and Stites, R. (eds). Russia in the Era of NEP: Explorations in Soviet Society and Culture. Bloomington and Indianapolis, Indiana University Press, 125-143.
Holmstrom, Nancy, The socialist feminist project: a contemporary reader in theory and politics (New York: Monthly Review Press, 2002).
Shulamith Firestone, 1970, “The Dialectic of Sex” Chapter 1 in The Dialectic of Sex. New York: Bantam.

Week 5 October 17-23



Seminar 9: 20th Century Radical Feminism

Pateman, Carole. 1988. “Contracting In” from The Sexual Contract. Cambridge: Polity Press, pp. 1-18.


Kate Millett, 1971, “Theory of Sexual Politics,” Chapter 2 in Sexual Politics. Chicago: University of Illinois Press.
Catherine A. MacKinnon, 1989, ‘Sexuality, Pornography, and Method: “Pleasure Under Patriarchy,”’ Ethics 99(2): 314-346.
Further Readings

Andrea Dworkin, 1988, Letters from a War Zone. Reprinted 1993 by Lawrence Hill Books.


Mary Daly, 1978, Gyn/Ecology: The Metaethics of Radical Feminism. Boston: Beacon Press.
Pateman, Carole, 1988. “Feminism and the Marriage Contract,” in The Sexual Contract. Cambridge: Polity Press.

Germaine Greer, 1970, The Female Eunuch. Harper Collins.


Valerie Solanas, 1967, “S.C.U.M. Manifesto.”
Adrienne Rich, 1986, Of Woman Born: Motherhood as Experience and Institution. New York: W.W. Norton & Company.

Seminar 10: Key Concept Emergence: Sex & Gender

Ann Oakley. 1972. “Sex and Gender,” pp. 158-172 in Sex, Gender, and Society. New York, NY: Harper Colophon Books.


West, Candace and Zimmermann, Don. 1987. “Doing Gender,” Gender& Society, 1: 125-151.
Further Readings

Monique Wittig, 1993, “One is Not Born a Woman,” The Lesbian and Gay Studies Reader.


Jacob Hale, 1996, “Are Lesbians Women?” Hypatia 11(2): 94-121 (A response to Wittig).
Monique Wittig, “The Category of Sex,” Feminist Issues. Fall 1982, pp. 63-68.
Judith Lorber, 1994, “Night to His Day: The Social Construction of Gender” Excerpts from Paradoxes of Gender, Yale University Press.

Week 6 October 24-30



Seminar 11: 20th Century Black (African-American) Feminism

Audre Lorde. ‘The Master’s Tools Will Never Dismantle the Master’s House.’ 1984. Sister Outsider: Essays and Speeches. Ed.Berkeley, CA: Crossing Press. 110-114.


Combahee River Collective, “A Black Feminist Statement.”
Patricia Hill Collins, 1995, “The Social Construction of Black Feminist Thought,” in Nancy Tuana and Rosemarie Tong (eds.), Feminism & Philosophy: Essential Readings in Theory, Reinterpretation, and Application. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.

Further Readings

bell hooks. 1995. “Black Women: Shaping Feminist Theory,” Feminist Theory: From Margin to Center, Boston, MA: South End Press.


Benita Roth, 2004, Separate Roads to Feminism: Black, Chicana, and White Feminist Movements in America’s Second Wave, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Patricia Hill Collins, “Toward an Afrocentric Feminist Epistemology,” in Alison M. Jaggar and Paula S. Rothenberg (eds.), Feminist Frameworks: Alternative Theoretical Accounts of the Relations Between Women and Men, 3rd Edition.Boston, MA: McGraw Hill.
bell hooks, 1982, Ain’t I a Woman: Black Women and Feminism. London: Pluto Press.
Becky Thompson, 2002, “Multiracial Feminism: Recasting the Chronology of Second Wave Feminism,” Feminist Studies 28(2): 337-360.
Rosalyn Baxandall, 2001, “Re-Visioning the Women’s Liberation Movement’s Narrative: Early Second Wave African American Feminists,” Feminist Studies 27(1): 225-245.


Seminar 12: 20th Century Anarchist- and Eco-Feminist Perspectives

Kathryn Pyne Addelson, Martha Ackelsberg, and Shawn Pyne, 1995, “Anarchism and Feminism,” in Nancy Tuana and Rosemarie Tong (eds.), Feminism & Philosophy: Essential Readings in Theory, Reinterpretation, and Application. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.


Carol J. Adams, 1990, The Sexual Politics of Meat: A Feminist-Vegetarian Critical Theory. New York: Continuum. pp.

Further reading:

Ynestra King, 1995, “Healing the Wounds: Feminism, Ecology, and Nature/Culture Dualism,” in Nancy Tuana and Rosemarie Tong (eds.), Feminism & Philosophy: Essential Readings in Theory, Reinterpretation, and Application. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.


Mary Mellor, 2001, “Feminism and Ecology: A Material Connection,” in Mary Evans (ed.), Feminism: Critical Concepts in Literary and Cultural Studies, vol 3. London: Routledge.

Week 7 October 31-Nov 6



Monday, October 31 National Holiday – NO CLASS
Seminar 13: Postcolonial Feminism

Mohanty, Chandra Talpade. 1991. “Under Western Eyes: Feminist Scholarship and Colonial Discourse,” Feminist Review no. 30 (Autumn 1988): 61-88; republished in Chandra Talpade Mohanty, Ann Russo and Lourdes Torres (eds), Third World Women and the Politics of Feminism. Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana UP, pp. 51-80.


Deniz Kandiyoti, 1988, “Bargaining with Patriarchy,” Gender and Society 2(3): 274-290.

Further Readings

Deniz Kandiyoti, 1998, “Gender, Power and Contestation: ‘Rethinking bargaining with patriarchy’”, in Cecile Jackson and Ruth Pearson (eds.), Feminist Visions of Development: Gender Analysis and Policy London: Routledge, pp. 138-154.


Lila Abu-Lughod. 2002. “Do Muslim Women Really Need Saving? Anthropological Reflections on Cultural Relativism and its Others,” American Anthropologist 104(3) (2002): 783-790.
Mridula Nath Chakraborty, 2007, “Wa(i)ving It All Away: Producing Subject and Knowledge in Feminisms of Colours,” in Stacy Gillis, Gillian Howie, and Rebecca Munford (eds.), Third Wave Feminism: A Critical Exploration. 2nd Edition. New York: Palgrave.
Deborah King, “Multiple Jeopardy: The Context of a Black Feminist Ideology,” in Alison Jaggar and Paula S. Rothenberg (eds.) 1993. Feminist Frameworks: Alternative Theoretical Accounts of the Relations Between Women and Men. Boston MA: McGraw Hill.
Gerda Lerner, “Reconceptualizing Differences Among Women,” in Alison Jaggar and Paula S. Rothenberg (eds.) 1993. Feminist Frameworks: Alternative Theoretical Accounts of the Relations Between Women and Men. Boston MA: McGraw Hill.

Week 8 November 7-13



Seminar 14: Key Concept Emergence: Is Multiculturalism Bad for Women?

Susan Moller Okin, 1999, “Is Multiculturalism Bad for Women?” in Is Multiculturalism Bad for Women?


Hirsi Ali, Ayan. 2006. The Caged Virgin chapters 1 and 2 (“Stand Up for Your Rights!” and “Why Can’t We Take A Critical Look at Ourselves”), pp. 1-16. Free Press.

Further Readings

Responses to Okin in: Joshua Cohen, Matthew Howard, and Martha C. Nussbaum, eds., Is Multiculturalism Bad for Women? Princeton: Princeton University Press.


Duits, Linda and Liesbet van Zoonen. 2006. “Headscarves and Porno-Chic: Disciplining Girls’ Bodies in the European Multicultural Society.” European Journal of Women’s Studies 13: 103-117.
Killian, Caitlin. 2003. “The other Side of the Veil: North African Women in France Respond to the Headscarf Affair.” Gender & Society 17 (4): 567-590.
Deniz Kandiyoti, "Between the Hammer and the Anvil: Post-Conflict Reconstruction, Islam, and Women's Rights," Third World Quarterly 28:3 (2007), 503-517
Schachar, Ayelet. 2001. “The perils of multicultural accommodation.” Chapter 2 in Multicultural Jurisdictions: Cultural Differences and Women’s Rights. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Seminar 15: Poststructuralism & the “Gender Turn”

Judith Butler, 1988, “Performative Acts and Gender Constitution,” in Julie Rivkin and Michael Ryan (eds.), Literary Theory: An Anthology. Maiden, MA: Blackwell Publishing.


Joan W. Scott, 1988, “Deconstructing Equality-Versus-Difference: Or, the Uses of Poststructuralist Theory for Feminism,” Feminist Studies 14(1): 32-50.


Further Readings

Linda Alcoff, 1995, “Cultural Feminism Versus Post-Structuralism: The Identity Crisis in Feminist Theory,” in Nancy Tuana and Rosemarie Tong (eds.), Feminism & Philosophy: Essential Readings in Theory, Reinterpretation, and Application. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.


Sasha Roseneil, 1999, “Postmodern Feminist Politics: The art of the (im)possible?” European Journal of Women’s Studies 6(2): 161-182.
Judith Butler, 1992, “Contingent Foundations: Feminism and the Question of ‘Postmodernism,’ in Judith Butler and Joan W. Scott (eds.), Feminists Theorize the Political. Abingdon, UK: Routledge.
Linda Singer, 1992, “Feminism and Postmodernism,” in Judith Butler and Joan W. Scott (eds.), Feminists Theorize the Political. Abingdon, UK: Routledge.
Sally Baden and Anne Marie Goetz, 1998, “Who needs [sex] when you can have [gender]? Conflicting discourses on gender at Beijing,” in Cecile Jackson and Ruth Pearson (eds.), Feminist Visions of Development: Gender Analysis and Policy London: Routledge pp 18-37.

Week 9 November 14-20



Seminar 16: Third Wave Feminism

Rita Alfonso and Jo Trigilio, 1997. “Surfing the Third Wave: A Dialogue between Two Third Wave Feminists”, in Hypatia 12(3): 7-16.


Deborah Siegel, 1997, “The Legacy of the Personal: Generating Theory in Feminism’s Third Wave.” Hypatia 12(3): 46-75.

Further Readings

Susan Archer Mann and Douglas J. Huffman, 2005, “The Decentering of Second Wave Feminism and the Rise of the Third Wave,” Science and Society 69(1): 56-91.


Catherine Orr, 1997, “Charting the Currents of the Third Wave,” Hypatia 12(3): 29-45.

R. Claire Snyder, 2008, “What is Third-Wave Feminism? A New Directions Essay,” Signs 34(1): 175-196.


Astrid Henry, 2004, Not My Mother’s Sister: Generational Conflict and Third-Wave Feminism, Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.
Kimberly Springer, 2002, “Third Wave Black Feminism?” Signs 27(4): 1059-1082.
Seminar 17: Key Concept Emergence: Intersectionality

Kimberle Crenshaw, 1989, “Demarginalizing the Intersection of Race and Sex: A Black Feminist Critique of Antidiscrimination Doctrine, Feminist Theory and Antiracist Politics,” University of Chicago Legal Forum Vo. 1989: 1, Article 8.


McCall, Leslie. 2005. “The Complexity of Intersectionality,” Signs, Vol. 30, No. 3, pp. 1771-1800.

Further Readings

Kathy Davis, 2008, “Intersectionality as a Buzzword: A Sociology of Science Perspective on What Makes a Feminist Theory Successful,” Feminist Theory 9(1): 67-85.


Crenshaw, Kimberle. 1991. “Mapping the Margins: Intersectionality, Violence Against Women of Color,” Stanford Law Review 43, 6: 1241-1279.

Week 10 November 21-27



Seminar 18: Contemporary Liberal Feminism

Sheryl Sandberg, 2010, “Why We Have Too Few Women Leaders?” TEDWomen. https://www.ted.com/talks/sheryl_sandberg_why_we_have_too_few_women_leaders


Amalia Sa’ar, 2005, “Postcolonial Feminism, the Politics of Identification, and the Liberal Bargain,” Gender & Society 19(5): 680-700.

Seminar 19: Contemporary Radical Feminism

Suzanne Moore, 2016, “Why I was Wrong About Men,” The New Statesman 5 September 2016. http://www.newstatesman.com/politics/feminism/2016/09/suzanne-moore-why-i-was-wrong-about-men.


Kristin Waters, 1997, “(Re)Turning to the Modern: Radical Feminism and the Post-Modern Turn,” in Diane Bell and Renate Klein (eds.), Radically Speaking: Feminism Reclaimed. Melbourne: Spinifex.

Week 11 November 28-Dec 4



Seminar 20: Contemporary Socialist Feminism

Nancy Fraser, 2013, “How Feminism Became Capitalism’s Handmaiden – and How to Reclaim It,” The Guardian, 14 October 2013. https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/oct/14/feminism-capitalist-handmaiden-neoliberal

Barbara Ehrenreich and Annette Fuentes “Life on the Global Assembly Line,” in Alison Jaggar and Paula S. Rothenberg (eds.) 1993. Feminist Frameworks: Alternative Theoretical Accounts of the Relations Between Women and Men. Boston MA: McGraw Hill.

Seminar 21: Lingering Debates: Pornography, Sex Work, and ‘Sexual Liberation’

Sheila Jeffreys, 2001, “Just a Job Like Any Other?: Prostitution as ‘work’” in Mary Evans (ed.), Feminism: Critical Concepts in Literary and Cultural Studies, vol 3. London: Routledge.


Melanie Waters, 2007, “Sexing It Up?: Women, Pornography and Third Wave Feminism,” in Stacy Gillis, Gillian Howie, and Rebecca Munford (eds.), Third Wave Feminism: A Critical Exploration. 2nd Edition. New York: Palgrave.
Further Reading

Meagan Tyler, 2011, Selling Sex Short: The Pornographic and Sexological Construction of Women’s Sexuality in the West. Newcastle upon Tyne, UK: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.


Laura Tarzia, 2015, “A fine line between pleasure and pain? On the issue of ‘choosing’ sexual violence,” in Miranda Kiraly and Meagan Tyler (eds.), Freedom Fallacy: The Limits of Liberal Feminism. Ballarat, AUS: Connor Court.
Sheila Jeffreys, 2009, The Industrial Vagina: The Political Economy of the Global Sex Trade, London: Routledge.
Shulamith Firestone, 1970 “The Culture of Romance,” The Dialectic of Sex, Bantam Books.
Charlotte Bunch, “Strategies for Organizing Against Female Sexual Slavery,” in Alison Jaggar and Paula S. Rothenberg (eds.) 1993. Feminist Frameworks: Alternative Theoretical Accounts of the Relations Between Women and Men. Boston MA: McGraw Hill.

Week 12 December 5-11



Seminar 22: Lingering Debates: Revisiting the question of sex & gender?

Susan Stryker, 2007, “Transgender Feminism: Queering the Woman Question,” in Stacy Gillis, Gillian Howie, and Rebecca Munford (eds.), Third Wave Feminism: A Critical Exploration. 2nd Edition. New York: Palgrave.


Sheila Jeffreys, 2014, “Transgenderism and Feminism,” in Gender Hurts. London: Routledge.

Further Readings

Anne Fausto-Sterling, 2008, “Should There Be Only Two Sexes?” in Alison Bailey and Chris Cuomo (eds.), The Feminist Philosophy Reader. Boston: McGraw Hill.


Kristen Schielt and Laurel Westbrook. 2009. “Doing Gender, Doing Heteronormativity: ‘Gender Normals’, Transgender People, and the Social Maintenance of Heterosexuality,” Gender & Society, 23: 440-464.
Tey, Meadow. 2010. “’A Rose is a Rose’: On Producing Legal Gender Classifications.” Gender & Society, 24, 6: 814-837.
Eleanor MacDonald, 1998, “Critical Identities: Rethinking Feminism Through Transgender Politics,” Atlantis 23(1): 3-12.
Janice Raymond, 1979, The Transsexual Empire: The Making of the She-Male, Boston: Beacon Press.


Seminar 23: Lingering Debates: Masculinities and the Place for Men in Feminism

William H. Becker, “Feminism’s Personal Questions – For Men,” in Alison Jaggar and Paula S. Rothenberg (eds.) 1993. Feminist Frameworks: Alternative Theoretical Accounts of the Relations Between Women and Men. Boston MA: McGraw Hill.


bell hooks, 1984, “Men: Comrades in the Struggle,” Feminist Theory from Margin to Center, New York: South End Press.

Further Readings

Victoria Robinson, 2003, “Radical Revisionings?: The Theorizing of Masculinity and (Radical) Feminist Theory,” Women’s Studies International Forum 26(2): 129-137.


Tom Digby (ed.), 1998, Men Doing Feminism. New York: Routledge.
Robert Jensen, “Patriarchal Sex,” in Steven P. Schacht and Doris W. Ewing (eds.), Feminism and Men: Reconstructing Gender Relations. New York: New York University Press.

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