Facts do matter—understand the point of credibility



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Facts do matter—understand the point of credibility

Thanks…

  • Heather and Hailey for helping those less advantaged at Paz de Chisto last Friday evening. If just everyone gave an hour or two a week…

What should you be reading?

Something to think about…

Recognition, Happy Birthdays and Congratulations!

  • It’s ’s birthday!

Zero Hour

  • Turn in “college costs” essays
  • 9 to a 9: Synthesis essay #3
    • IDs ONLY on your paper, and cover sheet
    • Reading/Planning/Pre-writing: 15 minutes (6:25-6:40)
    • Writing (in ink): 40 minutes (6:40-7:20)
    • Staple your cover sheet to the top of your essay and turn it in; retain the prompt/sources. Camera/Scoring is Monday
  • Tomorrow:
    • Bring your books! Grammar Lesson #7—pronouns
    • Instruction: writing a confirming argument—due Wednesday

AP Language and Composition Thursday, 2 February 2017

  • Time will pass; will you? 68 school days remain in the spring semester.
  • Today’s Objectives:
    • To write an argument, synthesizing outside sources.

Housekeeping

  • Turn in “college costs” essays
  • FREE TUTORING NOW AVAILABLE! Sign up with me.
  • Registrations?
    • AP Exams:
      • Wed, Feb 15, 2017 at 5:00 PM - Late Registration Ends/Final Day for Payment
      • Mon, Feb 20, 2017 at 5:00 PM - Registrations that have not been paid for will be cancelled and exams will not be ordered.
      • Questions? C-223.
    • Senior Registration: Feb. 9. Questions? See your counselor.
  • Keep abreast of the Daily Course Calendar.
    • Last updated February 1.
  • Writing Contests are now posted on the class website—you can earn optional credit for these.
  • Bringing your book to class—it’s on the assignment calendar, and you are responsible for bringing it!

Coming Due—do not squander time—that’s the stuff life’s made of!

  • Monday:
    • Grammar Lesson #7
  • Wednesday:
    • One confirming argument (must contain a citation)
  • Thursday:

Today’s Class, Period 1:

  • 9 to a 9: Synthesis essay #3
        • (book checks; please have your book on your desk for credit)
    • IDs ONLY on your paper, and cover sheet
    • Reading/Planning/Outlining/Pre-writing: 15 minutes (7:30-7:45)
      • You cannot begin writing the essay until time is called for reading, although you can continue reading/planning
    • Writing: 40 minutes (7:45-8:25)
      • Staple the cover sheet to the top of your essay and turn it in
    • Break: 5 minutes (8:25-8:30)
    • Camera/Scoring is Monday
  • Some hints for writing a confirming argument (8:30-8:55)
  • Grammar Lesson #7 (8:55-end of period)
    • Pronouns, page 420
      • Exercise #1, 1-10
      • Exercise #2

Today’s Class, Period 3 (C-lunch):

  • 9 to a 9: Synthesis essay #3
        • (book checks; please have your book on your desk for credit)
    • IDs ONLY on your paper, and cover sheet
    • Reading/Planning/Outlining/Pre-writing: 15 minutes (9:50-10:05)
      • You cannot begin writing the essay until time is called for reading, although you can continue reading/planning
    • Writing: 40 minutes (10:05-10:45)
      • Staple the cover sheet to the top of your essay and turn it in
    • Break: 5 minutes (10:45-10:50)
    • Camera/Scoring is Monday
  • Some hints for writing a confirming argument (10:50-11:20)
  • Grammar Lesson #7 (11:20-11:45)
    • Pronouns, page 420
      • Exercise #1, 1-10
      • Exercise #2

Grammar Lesson #7, due Monday

  • READ and take notes on your own
    • Pages 420-423
      • Consistency: Viewpoint and Number —what does this mean?
      • Sexist Pronoun Usage —what does this mean?
  • WORK with a partner
    • Exercise 1, #1-5; complete 6-10 at home
    • On your own: Exercise 5

Writing a confirming argument

  • Argument: Utilizing the proper psychological approach, people of differing political view can be brought to compromise
    • Read the essay “The Simple Psychological Trick to Political Persuasion” (this is straight-up out of Jay Heinrich’s Thank You For Arguing) and note my annotations.
    • Discuss at your table, what are some of the ways the author “confirms” her position—how does she prove her position? What are her strategies?

AP one-word scoring descriptors for timed writing essays:

  • Effective and Adequate Essays
  • A 9 is “unique”
  • An 8 is “sophisticated”
  • A 7 is “effective”
  • A 6 is “adequate”
  • A 5 is “uneven”
  • Ineffective Essays
  • A 4 is “inadequate”
  • A 3 is “unsuccessful”
  • A 2 is “confusing”
  • A 1 is “ugh?”

Evaluation

  • The 9-point rubric
  • The Anchor Papers—these are “samples”—responses vary
  • Camera Shots (these are worth 50 points)
  • Scoring…

Rhetoric

  • Rhetoric:
    • The traditional definition of rhetoric, first proposed by Aristotle, and embellished over the centuries by scholars and teachers, is that rhetoric is the art of observing in any given case the “available means of persuasion.”
  • Close Reading:
    • Reading to “develop an understanding of a text, written or visual, that is based first on the words and images themselves and then on the larger ideas those words suggest.”
  • Rhetorical Analysis:
    • Defining an author’s purpose, then identifying and analyzing the techniques and strategies employed to achieve that purpose.

Whose idea was this rhetoric thing?

  • Socrates: 469-399 B.C.E.
    • Father of Western philosophy and Mentor to Plato. Epistemology and logic.
  • Plato: 424-348 B.C.E.
    • Student of Socrates and founder of “The Academy” Philosophy, logic, ethics, rhetoric and mathematics.
  • Aristotle: 384-322 B.C.E.
    • Student of Plato, and teacher to Alexander the Great.

Why Goals and Objectives?

  • Course Goal—broad, long-term
  • Daily Objective—accomplishing “pieces” of the “goal,” one step at a time
    • To understand and evaluate the finer elements argument


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