Expectations this is a college course



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LDHS & HACC

HIS 120: Military History of the Second World War

Mr. Chortanoff Room 301 Time: Period 3 schortanoff@ldsd.org

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EXPECTATIONS (this is a college course)
Learn by reading, discussing, reflecting, observing, listening, and writing. Be respectful, prepared, and engaged.
TEXTBOOK (three required!)
Dr. Donald L. Miller’s The Story of the World War II (latest edition) and Dr. Stephen Ambrose’s The Good Fight: How World War II Was Won (latest edition) required textbook. The former is our main class textbook that will be the basis of our progress and discussions, while the latter is basically a glorified picture book that will serve as the introduction and overview of the course material. In addition…..
In the first few weeks of class, you and I will decide what other specialty book you must acquire; for example, Dr. Eugene Sledge’s With The Old Breed: At Peleliu and Okinawa, Dr. Leo Litwak’s The Medic: Life and Death in the Last Days of World War II, Iris Chang’s The Rape of Nanking, Robert Leckie’s Helmet For My Pillow, etc.
Supplemental material (articles, primary documents, videos, songs, maps, etc), in print and via hyperlinks will be used throughout the course. The textbook is an essential and mandatory resource for you to read and reflect upon. Bring it every day. You will read the entire textbook—sometimes in class. This expectation is part of my effort to expose you to a clear, coherent, cogent, and reasonable account of a significant yet romanticized era of political, diplomatic, military, technological, and social history.
COURSE DESCRIPTION (in brief)
This course offers students an overview of WWII, as well as detailed examinations of the important ideas, events, people, and results of the most catastrophic manmade event in history. Primary focus will be on analysis and evaluation of primary sources, scholarly materials, and discussion to learn about the origin, nature, course, and outcomes of WWII.
The class format may consist of lectures/notes, in class and out of class readings, small and large group discussions, partner/group work, map work, videos, exams, essays, structured debates, etc.
COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (what you will learn and be able to do)
Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:


  • Explain the origins of World War II

  • Examine military strategy from the points of view of the Allied and Axis countries

  • Explain the nature, course, and outcome of the war through an examination of important political decisions, military campaigns, and decisive battles

  • Demonstrate the nature and impact of total war

  • Examine the reasons for the United States involvement and the impact of America’s participation

  • Examine the impact of advanced technology and scientific invention on World War II weaponry, aviation, logistics, and communications

  • Discuss the controversial issues of World War II

  • Explain the war from various perspectives, such as an Allied combatant, Axis noncombatant, Allied political or military leader, or Axis officer, etc.

  • Evaluate the results of World War II

  • Compose substantial, original research papers based on primary sources and journal articles



COURSE OVERVIEW (overview of course content, materials, and pacing)
When available, see the Pacing Guide for details. This course addresses a remarkable era of history. We will begin our study of WWII with a review of WWI. Why? We will then move toward the ideological, political, diplomatic, economic, and military build ups, strategies, operations, battles, and events that sparked regional tensions into a global war of unimagined scale, depravity, horror, ferocity, and cost. Near the end of the course, we will be better prepared to judge these ideas, events, and people, as well as be in positions to appreciate the heroism, valor, grit, and ingenuity of countless combatants and noncombatants. At the end of this course, students will be able to reasonably—critically and creatively—express their understanding and feelings about WWII.
Remember that history is made every day. Without a doubt, our lessons from WWII demonstrate that we all have an obligation to interpret, learn from, preserve, and most importantly—use those lessons from history for the betterment of humanity. If we don’t, then we run the risk of being sheep led to slaughter by wolves in wool.
We will not simply study the product of history (as packaged into history books or History Channel videos) in the sense that all that historical matters are collections of indisputable facts to be memorized for the next multiple-guess test or trivia contest. The process behind and within history is fascinating and critical to our development as people and societies. We will always identify and make connections between what happened then and how it impacts our path of development and other world events. There are countless, interesting WWII stories to be told and interpreted; when appropriate, feel free to contribute to the class. Like other eras, this era of history has volumes of appealing and appalling stories. Even today, there are new lessons to be discovered, considered, and shared; perhaps you’ll be intrigued by political or military ideas and leaders, religious issues, economic trends, social values, technological innovations and inventions, intellectual or ideological movements, artist or artistic influences, geographic considerations, or the clashes among or within European or Asian cultures and nations. I hope you will be.
Students are responsible for reading, writing, critical thinking, research, discussion, and participation. My overall objective is to engage students with interesting and important ideas and material that leads them to understand, interpret, appreciate, and write about WWII.
Sample Timeline of the Course Material and Pace (this will be revised: see Pacing Guide):

Introduction…………………………………………………..one class

Prologue………………………………………………………..one week

Poland……………………………………………………………one class

Finland and Norway………………………………………..one class

Fall of France………………………………………………….one week

Battle of Britain………………………………………………one class

The U.S. and the war……………………………………….one class

Battle of the Atlantic………………………………………..one week

The Mediterranean………………………………………….one class

Invasion of Russia…………………………………………..one week

Road to Pearl Harbor………………………………………one week

Allied strategy…………………………………………………one class

Occupied Europe…………………………………………….one class

Japanese offensives…………………………………………one class

North Africa……………………………………………………one week

Stalingrad and Kursk……………………………………….one week

Pacific strategy………………………………………………..one class

European resistance movements………………………one class

Strategic bombing…………………………………………..one class

Italy……………………………………………………………….one week

Normandy………………………………………………………one class

Winning in the Pacific…………………………………….one class

Collapse of Germany………………………………………one week

Collapse of Japan……………………………………………one class

Impact and Legacy………………………………………….one class



COURSE METHODOLOGY AND EXPECTATIONS (how I teach and what to expect)
Students are expected to be attentive and participatory. All students will be accountable for daily assignments of reading and/or writing. These assignments will ensure that students are more than acquainted with the information and can contribute to the class activities, such as partner work or group discussions in meaningful ways. We will start with the basic overview and build on each lesson, so be prepared to ask questions, add to the conversation, or object to information you think is—well—objectionable. Students are expected to spend time out of class reading, writing, and thinking about assignments. I will not stand in front of you and just unload information on you. That is boring, ineffective, and would preclude much of your active thinking, appropriate questions, relevant ideas, and pertinent experiences. I strive for a diversity of teaching methods. Be a productive student and become engaged in the material and purpose of each class. No doubt, this is a challenging, yet rewarding course. I am here to teach and to lead the class, but I encourage students to get involved with the material and participate. In this course, my purpose is to provide students with an opportunity to learn the big picture and essential details of a significant era of America history. AGAIN: I will not stand in front of you and attempt to fill an empty vessel. I require students to read, think, write, plan, organize, prepare, research, study, discuss, test, and cooperate to the best of their abilities. Learning in this classroom is a two way street. I will do my part. If you do your part, then we will meet in the middle at the intended goal of learning, success, and fun. We will use SHEG activities and other primary documents.
ASSIGNMENTS (a chance to demonstrate your learning)
For grading, I use a total point system. I don’t accept late work. Only excused absences, emergencies, and pre-arranged accommodations override my no late work policy. My goal is to get you prepared to complete tasks on time and with a high quality effort. Be sure to use your time wisely (in and out of class), and start your assignments as soon as possible. I reserve the right to administer alternative tests at my discretion. Your essays must be double space typed in 12 point Times New Roman Font with 1 inch margins. You must use a cover page and bibliography in accordance with my sample cover page and MLA, respectively. It must be submitted electronically via email, google drive, or a flashdrive. About half the assignments and points are due in the 1st Marking Period, the rest are due in the 2nd Marking Period. The essays topics are your choice, provided I consent. They are research-based and focused on an argument (thesis statement, which must be underlined). In the library, we will use the school provided databases and sites to locate and use primary documents and journal articles. More details will be given.
The graded assignments may include, but are not limited to the following:

Mid Term Exam S.H.E.G.: Partner/Group Work

Final Exam Specialty Book Work (TBD)

First Essay Second Essay

“Engagement” (Prep/Participation/Quizzes/Reaction/Summary/MVP: Homework/Class Work)

Plagiarism is a serious academic offense. Students are expected to do their own academic work, and when using the work of others in their papers, to use some acceptable form of citation to give credit for ideas (paraphrasing) and direct quotations. MLA or Chicago/Turabian documentation is required. Students who use sources from the Internet must provide the ENTIRE URLs in the bibliography but use the author’s name or the article’s name in the parenthetical documentation. See Writing Guide.


HISTORICAL ANALYSIS WITH “P.R.E.S.T.I.G.E.” (a method to categorize, investigate, and use history)
P.R.E.S.T.I.G.E. is an acronym that contains the core categories of historical analysis. Each letter represents an area of study (see below). Understanding and using this acronym as a paradigm (model, way) of studying will immensely help you to organize your thoughts and questions. It is designed to help you brainstorm, organize, investigate, remember, and apply the lessons of history.
P. = politics (laws, constitution, systems, civics, discipline, crime, punishment, military, war)

R. = religion (variety, purpose, influences, beliefs, traditions, values, practices, codes)

E. = economics (theories/policies, currency, influences, interest rates, finance, businesses, commerce)

S. = society (values, beliefs, norms, mores, customs, traditions, behaviors, family, friendships)

T. = technology (science, medicine, industry, agriculture, consumer goods, transportation, war)

I. = intellectual movements and arts (education, influences, philosophy, theories, reason, logic, art)

G. = geography (features, climate, weather, influences, biology, environment, life cycle, resources)

E. = eras and themes (Ex: Reformation, Renaissance, Enlightenment, Roaring ‘20s, WWII, Cold War)
MEDIA RESOURCES: (see my website, too).

Videos:


http://video.paiunet.org/categories/veterans-national-education-program

http://video.pbs.org/

Reliable Websites:

http://www.history.army.mil/

http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/index.html

http://www.archives.gov/

http://www.ourdocuments.gov/index.php?flash=false&

http://www.uncp.edu/home/canada/work/allam/1914-/index.htm

http://www.vlib.us/amdocs/

http://www.pkwy.k12.mo.us/panda/curriculum/sochighmah.htm

http://www.learnoutloud.com/Free-Audio-Video/History/American-History

http://havefunwithhistory.com/movies/index.html

http://www.learnerstv.com/Free-History-video-lecture-courses.htm

http://www.history.com/videos/topics


EEOC/PHRC Syllabus Requirement
EEOC POLICY 005: It is the policy of Harrisburg Area Community College, in full accordance with the law, not to discriminate in employment, student admissions, and student services on the basis of race, color, religion, age, political affiliation or belief, gender, national origin, ancestry, disability, place of birth, General Education Development Certification (GED), marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, veteran status, genetic history/information, or any legally protected classification. HACC recognizes its responsibility to promote the principles of equal opportunity for employment, student admissions, and student services taking active steps to recruit minorities and women.
The Pennsylvania Human Relations Act (“PHRAct’) prohibits discrimination against prospective and current students because of race, color, sex, religious creed, ancestry, national origin, handicap or disability, record of a handicap or disability, perceived handicap or disability, relationship or association with an individual with a handicap or disability, use of a guide or support animal, and/or handling or training of support or guide animals.
The Pennsylvania Fair Educational Opportunities Act (“PFEOAct”) prohibits discrimination against prospective and current students because of race, religion, color, ancestry, national origin, sex, handicap or disability, record of a handicap or disability, perceived handicap or disability, and a relationship or association with an individual with a handicap or disability.
Information about these laws may be obtained by visiting the Pennsylvania Human Relations Commission website at www.phrc.state.pa.us.
If an accommodation is needed, please contact the disability coordinator for your campus:
HACC Harrisburg Campus
Carole Kerper - clkerper@hacc.edu
Director of Disability Services
Cooper 230
One HACC Drive
Harrisburg PA 17110
Phone: 717-780-2614
Fax: 717-780-2335

**Your main contact at HACC, for this course, is Danielle Martin. Contact her at 221.1788 or dnmartin@hacc.edu.

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