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ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

Division of Academic Affairs

Annual Reports 2009-2010
Academic Departments

(and Other Units to Which Student Learning Outcomes Pertain)
Annual reports for units in the Division of Academic Affairs are to be posted to the Annual Report section of the unit’s strategic planning site on UPIC according to the following schedule:


  • Academic departments/divisions: Wednesday, June 30

  • Colleges and other units: Wednesday, July 21

  • Division of Academic Affairs: Wednesday, August 11

For questions related to the UPIC site contact Keith King at kcking@uwf.edu.

An electronic copy should also be forwarded to the Office of Academic Affairs (academicaffairs@uwf.edu)
PART I
Part I-SP, Summary Report on Status of Strategic Planning Goals/Objectives
To be completed by all units. See attached template for Part I-SP.
To be completed only by academic departments:
Go to Part I-ALC/ALP/AFP, Summary Report on Assessment of Student Learning

Undergraduate Programs: Academic Learning Compacts (ALCs)

Graduate Programs: Academic Learning Plans (ALPs)

General Education: Academic Foundation Plans (AFPs)


PART II
Part II-A, Major Unit Accomplishments and Changes in Programs and Services
To be completed by all units. See attached template for Part II-A.


Part II-B, Distinguished Individual Accomplishments
To be completed by all units. See attached template for Part II-B.

Part II-C, Community Engagement Activities with Participation on Behalf of UWF
To be completed by all units. See attached template for Part II-C.
PART III
Part III-A, Strategic Planning Goals/Objectives
To be completed by all units. See attached template for Part III-A.
Part III-B, New Degree Program Projections
To be completed only by the Dean for the college-level annual report. See attached template for
Part III-B.

Annual Report, 2009-2010


Department/Division: Environmental Studies
College: Arts & Sciences
Part I-SP, Summary Report on Status of Strategic Planning Goals/Objectives



Program/Function/Service

Strategic Goal/Objectivea

Related UWF Strategic Goal b

Method of Assessment

Summary of Assessment Resultscd

Use of Assessment
Results to Improve Program/Function/Servicee

EVR/teaching

To streamline curriculum at the B.S. level for greater efficiency in teaching and enrollment management, as well as to reduce adjunct use as mandated by the College.

1a, 1c, 2b, 4d

Greater FTE generation per course on average.

Still too early to assess. We have developed a new curriculum, and CCRs are being prepared for submission.

Premature.

EVR/teaching

To work with personnel in the Department of Chemistry on a potential joint M.S.-level curricular track

1b, 1c, 2c, 2d, 4d, 4e, 5a

Number of enrollees in such a program.

Still too early to assess. Discussions on this goal are still in progress.

Premature.

EVR/service

To assist UWF in greening” the campus “ via energy, landscaping, and other sustainability initiatives

3a, 3c, 3d

Greater collaboration with other academic and non-academic units at UWF

Successfully met, but still ongoing,

Cost-savings to UWF.

EVR/teaching

To increase enrollment in the M.S. program.

2a, 2c, 2d, 2e

Number of Graduate FTEs generated.

Partially met. Word of mouth efforts seem to have generated more interest in the MS program for 2010.

Need for additional recruitment efforts was noted.

EVR/teaching

To expand the successful Online GIS Certificate program to include a track (specialization) in Archeology (delayed from 2008-09)

1b, 2a, 2b

Number of enrollees in such a program.

Too early to assess. Money was transferred to Archaeology to develop two courses, but Archaeology personnel have not come though to do so.

Premature.

EVR/teaching & research

To physically expand the department (currently bursting at the seams), to half of the third floor of Building 13 by 2010….and perhaps to the Science Building (58) by 2014 or so.

1a, 3a, 3c, 4e, 5a, 5d

Measure of square footage (or numbers of labs, classrooms, faculty/staff/student offices, etc.)

In theory, goal was met in that the space has been allocated. In practice, surplus material from Physics has not been removed, and our move-in date is August at the earliest.

Premature.

EVR/service

To display a departmental presence at the Maritime Museum (provided our staffing needs have been met).

4b, 4c, 4d, 4e, 4f

Public feedback.

Premature. UWF’s commitment to the museum has been postponed.

Premature.

EVR/teaching

To add at least one tenure-track position to the department to replace adjunct instruction

5a, 5d

Number of new lines acquired.

Partly met. Instead of a tenure-track line, Chasidy Hobbs was hired on an instructor line.

Enrollment data show that Chasidy is bringing in a high proportion of the FTEs in our department.

EVR/service

To hire a student advisor/public relations person/K-12 outreach coordinator for the department.

2a, 2c, 2d, 2e, 4b, 4c, 4d, 4f

Acquisition of new position.

Not met.

The data show how important such a position is to a department.

aFrom unit’s 2009-2010 strategic or action plan. Add lines as necessary.

bInsert Focus/Goal number/letter from the UWF Strategic Priorities and Measurable Achievements, 2008-2012.

cData/information used to determine goal/objective status.

dCan comment on status of goal as “met,” “not met,” or “in progress.”

eDescribe decisions made based on assessment results to improve program
Annual Report, 2009-2010
Department/Division: Environmental Studies
College: Arts & Sciences
Part I-ALC/ALP/AFP, Summary Report on Assessment of Student Learning

Undergraduate Programs: Academic Learning Compacts (ALC)

Graduate Programs: Academic Learning Plans (ALP)

General Education: Academic Foundation Plans (AFP)


To be completed by academic units offering degree programs or general education.

I-ALC Undergraduate Programs: For Each Program

See attached TEMPLATE


I-ALP Graduate Programs: For Each Program

See attached TEMPLATE


I-AFP Academic Foundations: General Education Status: For Each Course Assessed

To be completed by academic units offering one or more courses in General Studies / Academic Foundations. Submit a report for each course in which assessment activities for General Studies/Academic Foundations took place in 2009-2010.


See attached TEMPLATE

I-ALC. Undergraduate Programs - To be completed by academic units offering degree programs.
Annual Report, 2009-2010
Department/Division: Environmental Studies
College: Arts & Sciences
Part I-ALC, Summary Report on Assessment, Academic Learning Compacts (ALC)
Program Titlea: Environmental Science Degreeb B.S. CIP Code: _3.0104 ___________
aPrepare separate summary table for each degree program.

bFor example, BA, BS, BSBA


  • Based on direct measures of student learning in the domain(s) your department assessed, compare your students’ performance this year to their performance last year.

  • Duplicate this section when reporting assessments for more than one domain for a given program.




Indicate the student learning outcome assessed (check one):

x

Content




Communication




Project Management




Critical Thinking




Integrity/Values




Other (describe)




Based on departmental assessments, student learning in this domain was (check one):




Worse than last year

x

Equivalent to last year




Slightly better than last year




Moderately better than last year




Dramatically better than last year




Cannot be compared (this is the first year for this assessment)




Describe the direct measure(s) used to assess student learning in this domain (e.g., answers to questions included on an exam, performance on a paper or project scored with a rubric, etc.). Include information about any additional measures used to assess learning outcomes in this domain.

As we did last year, we used an Exit Exam to assess content knowledge. The exit exam is given to all students in our program during their capstone Senior Seminar course (which they take during their senior year…and preferably during their last semester). This exam is short essay format and is intended to assess mostly content but also other domains, notably critical thinking.


If you observed changes in student performance on this measure when comparing the two years, briefly describe (in one or two sentences) the nature of these changes.

Last year we had a very detailed analysis of the data, but the overall numbers were too low to be meaningful. This year, we have not yet crunched the numbers as thoroughly, in part because the grading of the Spring 2010 exit exams is not yet complete. (Grading is done by the individual faculty who wrote the questions, and between faculty traveling in May 2010 and one on sabbatical, we don’t have the final numbers in yet.) However, preliminary inspection of the (as yet incomplete) results show little change in student responses from the previous year.


Use of Assessment Data for Making Decisions. Describe the process used in your department to evaluate assessment evidence and make decisions (include dates of relevant department meetings if known). Describe the decisions made to improve student learning in your program. Describe how these decisions are related to the assessment evidence collected by your department.

What we are seeing is that perhaps a restructuring of the exit exam is in order for several reasons: 1) Although the format of the exam is short essay, some of the questions are more detailed than others (and many students forget the details but remember the overall concepts), 2) There is inconsistency in grading the essays by individual faculty members, 3) Since we went to a partial “menu-driven” curriculum in 2007 (e.g., “choose one of the following” courses), not all questions are applicable to all students, and many are left blank, 4) one faculty member decided to tailor the exit exam to each specific student in his Senior Seminar class (which made for a better individualized test but made comparative analysis more difficult.


Use of Assessment Data for Improvement of Assessment Procedures. Describe any changes made to assessment methods. Explain the relation between these changes and the information obtained from previous assessments.

The department is currently engaged in a major structural overhaul of the curriculum, and three tracks will be collapsed into two. There will be an “overall core” of courses as well as track “cores” and also more of a true capstone experience. Once the new 2011 curriculum is established, we plan to have several faculty meetings to revise (or revisit) the exit exam. We have already talked of other models such as a computerized exam taken by students individually just before they graduate. The creation of a stronger “core” of classes would allow us to assess on this suite of courses rather than the “menu-driven” courses via which not all students are exposed to the same content material



Describe the Department’s Commitment to Assessment Activities in 2010-2011

Domain(s) to be examined from department’s multi-year assessment plan in 2010-2011

Until we get the assessment tool right, we want to stay focused upon content. All domains are covered in our new 2011 curriculum, and some of them might be easier to assess. But we want to get the content assessment piece correct first.


Assessment question(s) to be addressed in 2010-2011

How can we improve the Exit Exam to both challenge the students in a comprehensive way and also get meaningful results that can be quantified? How can questions be posed to contain the proper mix of detail and generality? Is a rubric needed for scoring questions, rather then the numeric 1-10 method now in place? Should all students be required to answer all questions, even if they have not yet completed the associated course?


I-ALP. Graduate Programs - To be completed by academic units offering graduate degree programs.
Annual Report, 2009-2010
Department/Division: Environmental Studies
College: Arts & Sciences
Part I-ALP, Summary Report on Assessment, Academic Learning Plans (ALP)
Program Titlea: Environmental Science Degreeb M.S. CIP Code: ____3.0104 _____
aPrepare separate summary table for each degree program.

bFor example, MA, MS, M.Ed., Ed.D.



  • Based on direct measures of student learning in the Academic Foundations domain(s) your department assessed, compare your students’ performance this year to their performance last year. Duplicate this section when reporting assessments for more than one domain for a given program.




Indicate the student learning outcome assessed (check one):

x

Content




Communication




Project Management




Critical Thinking




Integrity/Values




Other (describe)




Based on departmental assessments, student learning in this domain was (check one):




Worse than last year

x

Equivalent to last year




Slightly better than last year




Moderately better than last year




Dramatically better than last year




Cannot be compared (this is the first year for this assessment)




Describe the direct measure(s) used to assess student learning in this domain (e.g., answers to questions included on an exam, performance on a paper or project scored with a rubric, etc.). Include information about any additional measures used to assess learning in this domain.

For thesis-track students, a rubric was used to assess the thesis.

For non-thesis-track students, comprehensive exams were administered to assess program learning.




If you observed changes in student performance on this measure when comparing the two years, briefly describe (in one or two sentences) the nature of these changes.

This is the third year that we systematically collected assessment information for our graduate program. We saw little change in the results. (Number of MS degrees awarded 2009-2010 = 14.)

2009-2010 = ), the data are not




Use of Assessment Data for Making Decisions. Describe the process used in your department to evaluate assessment evidence and make decisions (include dates of relevant department meetings if known). Describe the decisions made to improve student learning in your program. Describe how these decisions are related to the assessment evidence collected by your department.

Faculty members are furnished with the answers to the comprehensive exams, and they then determine if the content knowledge of the students for their classes meets their expectations. Graduate assessment was discussed at a faculty meeting in Fall 2009. Cursory observations suggest that the content knowledge of graduating graduate students is acceptable.


Use of Assessment Data for Improvement of Assessment Procedures. Describe any changes made to assessment methods. Explain the relation between these changes and the information obtained from previous assessments.

Since we felt the assessment results were acceptable AND we only had two years of good data (Year 1 we had very few MS graduates), no changes were implemented to the elaborate rubrics we presently use. We had talked about focusing on communication in addition to content, but this was never formalized (in part because Graduate Coordinator Johan Liebens was on sabbatical in 2009-10).



Describe the Department’s Commitment to Assessment Activities in 2010-2011

Domain(s) to be examined from the department’s multi-year assessment plan in 2010-2011

Communication.


Assessment question(s) to be addressed in 2010-2011

How can we best assess communication skills—oral and written—for graduate students in the non-thesis track? Thesis-track students have both a written thesis as well as an oral thesis defense, but we don’t have a similar requirement of the non-thesis-track students.


I-AFP. Academic Foundations / General Education - To be completed by academic units offering courses related to General Studies.
Annual Report, 2009-2010
Department/Division: Environmental Studies
College: Arts & Sciences
Part I-AFP, Summary Report on Assessment, Academic Foundations Plan
General Studies Coursea: GLY 2010 Physical Geology
aPrepare separate summary table for each course assessed.

  • Departments offering Academic Foundations/General Education courses are required to report on at least two student learning outcomes.

  • Based on direct measures of student learning in the domain(s) your department assessed, compare your students’ performance this year to their performance last year.Duplicate this section when reporting assessments for more than one domain for a given course.




Indicate the Academic Foundations learning domain assessed (check one):




Critical Thinking




Integrity/Values




Communication

X

Project Management




Based on departmental assessments, student learning in this domain was (check one):




Worse than last year

X

Equivalent to last year




Slightly better than last year




Moderately better than last year




Dramatically better than last year




Cannot be compared (this is the first year for this assessment)




Describe the direct measure(s) used to assess student learning in this domain (e.g., answers to questions included on an exam, performance on a paper or project scored with a rubric, etc.). Include information about any additional measures used to assess learning in this domain.

A Likert survey was prepared to assess students experience with and attitudes toward group activities in science courses. This same survey was used in the previous three years. This subject was chosen based on the hypothesis that students who have more positive opinions of group activities would also have more developed abilities in project management and related skills used during group activities. Changes in student perception of the utility and relevance of group activities would be assessed to determine if the group activities employed in the lecture portion of Physical Geology 1) aided student learning and 2) improved student’s skills in group activities, including project management.
The survey was divided into two parts: “Learning Science” and “Science Research”. The goal of the “Learning Science” portion was to assess student opinion on group activities as a learning mechanism. The “Science Research” portion gauged how students viewed the role of group activities to the field of science as well as their interest in pursuing a career in the field. The survey was offered on a pre- and post-course schedule, with the first survey taken during the first week of classes and the second survey offered during the last week of the semester. The two surveys were identical and both were offered via the Survey option in the UWF eLearning program. All survey responses were anonymous.


If you observed changes in student performance on this measure when comparing the two years, briefly describe (in one or two sentences) the nature of these changes.

Compared to their fall 2008 peers, fall 2009 students indicated that their science classes were more likely to involve group assignments and/or projects. Fall 2009 students also indicated a greater preference for group work than their fall 2008 peers and were much less likely to think that group work “usually end(s) up with one or two persons doing most of the work.” These results suggest that fall 2009 students indicate a stringer preference for, and ability to manange, group projects than in previous years.


Use of Assessment Data for Making Decisions. Describe the process used in your department to evaluate assessment evidence and make decisions (include dates of relevant department meetings if known). Describe the decisions made to improve student learning in your program. Describe how these decisions are related to the assessment evidence collected by your department.

No comprehensive departmental discussion has been conducted for the assessment plan or results, though they may be discussed at an upcoming faculty meeting devoted to assessment measures of the Environmental Studies curriculum.


Use of Assessment Data for Improvement of Assessment Procedures. Describe any changes made to assessment methods. Explain the relation between these changes and the information obtained from previous assessments.

Matthew Schwartz previously expressed doubts about the efficacy of this assessment model, namely the hypothesis that students who have more positive opinions of group activities would also have more developed abilities in project management and related skills used during group activities and the utility of the survey question in assessing that hypothesis. Furthermore, he is concerned that General Education courses are not the best level in which to assess the project management domain.
In an effort to expand the reach of the General Education assessment, Schwartz and Jason Ortegren will collaborate to develop a scoring rubric that can be used to assess critical thinking concepts in the three Environmental Studies general Education courses: GEO1200 (Physical Geography), GEO2330 (Environmental Science), and GLY2010 (Physical Geology). In consultation with UWF CUTLA personnel, Schwartz and Ortegren will develop a common scoring rubric to assess critical thinking concepts in writing assignments with each of the courses and will develop an online survey that will be offered on a pre-/post- cycle to students in each of the three courses.



Describe the Department’s Commitment to Assessment Activities in 2010-2011

Domain(s) to be examined from the department’s multi-year assessment plan in 2010-2011

Critical Thinking. In 2010-11, we will switch to an assessment of Critical Thinking and expand the assessed courses to include GEO1200 (Physical Geography), GEO2330 (Environmental Science), and GLY2010 (Physical Geology).


Assessment question(s) to be addressed in 2010-2011

Do Environmental Studies General Education courses (GEO1200, GEO2330, and GLY2100) provide sufficient opportunities to develop critical thinking capabilities through writing assignments and related activities?


Annual Report, 2009-2010
Department/Division: Environmental Studies
College: Arts & Sciences
Part II-A, Major Unit Accomplishments and Changes in Programs and Services

List major department/division accomplishments and changes in programs and services for 2009-2010. (Add lines as needed.)




  1. The department conducted a successful faculty search in 2009, and Dr. Jason Ortegren joined the department in Fall 2009 to teach courses in Physical Geography, Land Use Management, and Climatology.

  2. To plug the gap caused by faculty departures, Ms. Chasidy Hobbs was hired as full-time instructor, mostly to cover courses formerly taught by Dr. Mel Droubay but also to assist in advising.

  3. Data from the Dean’s Office indicate that the number of majors has increased from around 100 (Fall 2007) to 130 (Fall 2008) to 175 (Fall 2009), an incredible rate of growth that may be indicative of the popularity of the program in future years.

  4. In view of reduced resources, the department held several long faculty meetings debating how best to strengthen the curriculum and maximize enrollments. We agreed to reduce the number of tracks from three to two and to add “cores” to the overall and track curricula, as well as to strengthen the capstone experience for all students.

  5. The third year of the online GIS certificate program finished in December 2009 (with 38 receiving certificates), and a fourth season began in January 2010. The program has been quite successful, and coordinator Ms. Amber Bloechle was hired into a full-time line at UWF.

  6. The department bought a new 15-passenger van in Summer 2009 (thanks to funds generated by the online GIS certificate program). This facilitated not only local field trips as parts of lab sections or research projects (especially those conducted by Matt Schwartz and Klaus Meyer-Arendt) but also trips to regional professional conferences in the Southeast.

  7. The distance-learning B.S. program in Oceanography is growing. In 2007-08 the number of majors was 19, but by Summer 2009 we had 24 declared majors, and by Summer 2010 the number had risen to 32.

  8. Since the first graduate student (Chasidy Hobbs) finished her M.S. in Environmental Science in May 2007, twenty additional students finished by May 2009. Between May 2009 and May 2010, an additional 14 students received their MS degrees.

  9. Over 150 people attended the 2010 Earth Day Symposium at UWF sponsored by SEAS (the student environmental club), the Department of Environmental Studies, and UWF. Ms. Chasidy Hobbs organized this event, at which 6 UWF faculty members pontificated on how environmental issues play major roles in their respective academic disciplines.

  10. Our department co-sponsored the community meeting “What’s in your Drinking Water” at UWF. A panel of 6 (including 3 UWF faculty) debated the Environmental Working Group’s (EWG) low rating of Pensacola’s drinking water. The audience totaled 125.

  11. The department developed curricula for two Professional Science Master’s (PSM) programs aimed at working professionals. One was in Sustainable Environmental Management and the other was in GIS. Whether there is backing by UWF to push these forward is still uncertain.

Annual Report, 2009-2010


Department/Division: Environmental Studies
College: Arts & Sciences
Part II-B, Distinguished Individual (Faculty, Staff, and Student) Accomplishments
List college/departmental distinctions earned by faculty, staff, and students during 2009-2010.
A. Faculty
1. Promotions

  • Dr. Zhiyong Hu was approved for promotion from assistant to associate professor effective Fall 2010.

  • Dr. Matt Schwartz was approved for promotion from assistant to associate professor effective Fall 2010.

  • Dr. John Waldron was approved for promotion from assistant to associate professor effective Fall 2010.

2. Tenure



  1. Dr. Zhiyong Hu was approved for tenure effective Fall 2010.

  2. Dr. Matt Schwartz was approved for tenure effective Fall 2010.

  3. Dr. John Waldron was approved for tenure effective Fall 2010.

3. Awards


4. Other Distinctions

  1. Dr. Zhiyong Hu’s first-authored book chapter was accepted for publication on Geospatial Analysis of Environmental Health by Springer Verlag. Dr. Hu also published a peer-reviewed article in an international journal. He presented his research findings at the International Cartography Conference in Santiago, Chile.

  2. Dr. Johan Liebens published a peer-reviewed article that was co-authored with his former graduate student. An invited book chapter on which Dr. Liebens is co-author was accepted for publication. Three articles based on his long-standing cooperation with CEDB faculty are currently in review. Results from one of the studies conducted in cooperation with CEDB were presented at an international conference on soil geography in Mexico. Dr. Liebens reviewed by invitation 17 grant applications for the EPA STAR program. He also was a member of the CEDB Program Review Committee. Dr. Liebens organized and conducted a nine-day field trip for the Honors Program to study environmental issues in the western US.

  3. Dr. Klaus Meyer-Arendt served as member of the Executive Board of Directors of the Florida Geographic Alliance. He continues to serve on the editorial board of three peer-reviewed journals. He worked (as PI or co-PI) on six research grants in 2009-2010. A presentation on the proposed PSM degree in Sustainable Environmental Management was well received at the National Association of Environmental Professionals conference. Perhaps most importantly, he was quoted on the back cover of the new book Hurricanes of the Gulf Coast, which he reviewed for LSU Press.

  4. Dr. Jason Ortegren was invited to present a talk as the plenary speaker at the Southeastern Lakes Management Society’s annual meeting. He also submitted three manuscripts for review and made two additional presentations at professional conferences.

  5. Dr. Matt Schwartz was selected (from three internal candidates) to succeed Klaus Meyer-Arendt as Department Chair effective Fall 2010. He is co-PI on an NSF grant and is also directing work on a National Park Service contracted research project. Dr. Schwartz was a member of the ITS and Biology Program review committees and continues to perform technical reviews for several international journals and funding agencies.

  6. Dr. John Waldron was co-PI on a Texas A&M University grant for $123,800 from the USDA Forest Service for the first year of a new project evaluating the impacts of hemlock decline in the southern Appalachian Mountains.

B. Staff
C. Students



  1. Lucas Furman, Julianne Rosset, and Alannah Ward each received $800 Environmental Steward scholarships from the Coastal Plains chapter of the Air and Waste Management Association in February 2010.

  2. Leah Lewis was awarded the first-ever Online GIS fellowship in Fall 2009. The GTA position pays salary and all tuition for a two-year appointment.

  3. Four students (Kimberly Baldwin, Zeviel Persellin, Tanya Gallagher, and Toby Stapleton) presented posters at the annual SEASTARS at UWF. Toby was awarded “best of department” for his “Wildfire susceptibility in Blackwater River State Forest, Florida based on topographical and fuels mapping”.

  4. William Abbott was awarded a prestigious Bridge-to-the-Doctorate fellowship by the University of South Florida at St. Petersburg, where he will major in Chemical Oceanography. The stipend pays $20,000 per year plus 90% of tuition plus health insurance.

  5. Bryce van Dam was accepted in the Soil and Water graduate program at the University of Florida (with funding).

  6. Michael Somerville, a Fall 2009 MS graduate, had a paper accepted for publication in Soil and Sediment Contamination. This reflects well upon the high quality of his thesis work on DDT in Belize.

  7. Jason Pietroski landed an internship with EPA in Washington, DC for Summer 2010 as a result of his acceptance into the Washington Center’ Science Technology and Society program.

Annual Report, 2009-2010
Department/Division: Environmental Studies
College: Arts & Sciences
Part II-C, Community Engagement Activities (Faculty, Staff, and Student)
Information about community engagement will be used to document the University’s activities related to its service mission, to comply with a new SACS standard pertaining to community service, and to support the University’s application for classification by the Carnegie Foundation as a “community engagement” institution.
List all college/departmental community engagement activities with participation on behalf of UWF by faculty, staff, and students during 2009-2010. Please include a very brief description of the Activity, the Community Partner, and the Outcome/Impact of the activity.
Examples of community engagement activities include participation on community-based projects, organization and/or presentation of cultural community events, faculty scholarship related to community action, student scholarship related to community action, participation on community organization boards, and community-based student learning activities such as service learning projects, internships, and capstone experience projects.




Activity


Community Partner

Outcome/Impact



A. Faculty










Chasidy Hobbs

Earth Day Symposium

NW Florida

Info dissemination

Chasidy Hobbs

Water Symposium

Emerald Coastkeepers

Info dissemination

Johan Liebens

member

FAEP

networking

K. Meyer-Arendt

member

FAEP

networking

K. Meyer-Arendt

member

AWMA

networking

K. Meyer-Arendt

exhibitor

Earth Day Pensacola

Networking/ recruitment

K. Meyer-Arendt

Quoted expert (oil spill)

Pensacola News Journal

Public relations

Jason Ortegren

linkage

PNS Planning

Internship for grad student

Matt Schwartz

Oceanography talk

FWB Yacht Club

networking

Matt Schwartz

Science Fridays talk

NWFSC, Niceville

recruitment

Matt Schwartz

Board member

Emerald Coastkeepers

public relations

Matt Schwartz

Kayak tour guide

M Kelley Family Festival

public relations

Matt Schwartz

Seagrass assessment

Gulf Islands NS

Maintain prof relationship

Matt Schwartz

Scholarship chair

AWMA

networking

John Waldron

Participant, Earth Day

City of Ft. Walton Beach

Info dissemination













B. Staff










Amber Bloechle

GIS presentation

NWFSC, Niceville

recruitment

Amber Bloechle

GIS presentation

Addie Lewis Middle Sch

recruitment

Amber Bloechle

GIS presentation

Walton Middle School

recruitment

Amber Bloechle

GIS presentation

Gulf Breeze Middle Sch

recruitment

Amber Bloechle

GIS presentation

Dahne High School

recruitment

Amber Bloechle

GIS presentation

Fairhope High School

recruitment

Wil Hugli

UWF advisor

Eglin AFB

recruitment

Nathan McKinney

Open house

St. Michael’s Cem

Info dissemination

Nathan McKinney

GIS presentation

NWFSC, Niceville

recruitment

Nathan McKinney

Advising interns

Escambia County

Intern opportunities













Annual Report, 2009-2010
Department/Division: Environmental Studies
College: Arts & Sciences
Part III-A, Strategic Planning Goals/Objectives for 2010-2015 (specify time frame; e.g., 2010-2011, 2010-2015).
List strategic plan goals/objectives and planned method of assessment (if applicable).


Strategic Goal/Objectivea

Related UWF Strategic Goalb

Method of Assessmentc

To streamline curriculum at the B.S. level for greater efficiency in teaching and enrollment management.

1a, 1c, 2b, 4d

Greater FTE generation per course on average.

To work with personnel in the Department of Chemistry on a potential joint M.S.-level curricular track.

1b, 1c, 2c, 2d, 4d, 4e, 5a

Number of enrollees in such a program.

To assist UWF in greening” the campus “ via energy, landscaping, and other sustainability initiatives.

3a, 3c, 3d

Greater collaboration with other academic and non-academic units at UWF.

To increase enrollment in the M.S. program.

2a, 2c, 2d, 2e

Number of Graduate FTEs.

To increase the use of faculty-led experiential learning for both undergraduate and graduate students.

1b, 2e, 4e,

Number of undergraduate research projects and graduate theses completed or in progress.

To increase the involvement of faculty in student research efforts.

1b, 2e, 4e, 5a, 5d

Number (and %) of faculty advising undergraduate projects and graduate theses

To expand the successful Online GIS Certificate program to include a track in Archeology (delayed from 2008-09).

1b, 2a, 2b

Number of enrollees in such a program.

To physically expand the department (currently bursting at the seams), to half of the third floor of Building 13 by 2010….and perhaps to the Science Building (58) by 2014 or so.

1a, 3a, 3c, 4e, 5a, 5d

Measure of square footage (or numbers of labs, classrooms, faculty/staff/student offices, etc.)

To create a new GeoData Center (hub of GIS activity at UWF) in 13/311 by Fall 2010.

1a, 3a, 3c, 4c, 4e

Volume of lab usage for classroom and research purposes.

To add at least one tenure-track position to the department to replace adjunct instruction.

5a, 5d

Number of new lines acquired.

To hire an assessment/p.r. person/K-12 outreach coordinator for the department.

2a, 2c, 2d, 2e, 4b, 4c, 4d, 4f

Acquisition of new position.

To hire an advisor for the undergraduate programs of the allied departments of Environmental Studies and Chemistry.

2a, 2c, 2d, 3a, 4d (and indirectly 5a, 5d)

Acquisition of new position.

To revise the exit exam (and other assessment measures) to both reflect the new 2011 curriculum and to improve quality of assessment data.

1c




Annual Report, 2009-2010
Department/Division: Environmental Studies
College: Arts & Sciences
Part III-B, New Degree Program Projections
This section to be completed only by the Dean for the college-level annual report.

NOTE: This information is shared annually with the UWF Board of Trustees and is used to complete the Board of Governors Work Plan.


List new degree programs and specializations under consideration and planned year of implementation.


Program Title

Levela

New Degreeb

New Specializationc

Implementation Year

Yes

No

Yes

No

na
















































































































































































































aFor example, BA, BSBA, MEd.

bFor degrees not currently offered as stand-alone programs; will require submission of requests to Faculty Senate and Board of Trustees.

cFor new specializations within an existing degree program; will require submission of request to Faculty Senate but not to Board of Trustees.


Annual Report, 2009-2010

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