Environmental education earth science department d



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ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION EARTH SCIENCE

DEPARTMENT D


All exhibits must be pre-entered at the Seward County Extension Office by July 10th.

* denotes entries not eligible for State Fair
Ryan & Jamie Krenk, Co-Superintendents
Show What You Did & Learned, Use Proper Sourcing, Tag exhibits with Exhibitor name

Wildlife & Wildlife Laws - "Animal" or "wildlife" in the following instructions includes wild fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, or mammals. Follow wildlife laws; example: wildlife laws do not allow collection of bird nests, eggs, or any of their parts.
Project Materials - Related project booklets include Exploring Your Environment Series, 4-H Shooting Sports, Amphibians, Bird Behavior (EC 5-93-81), Fishing for Adventure Project Manuals, Wildlife Conservation (4-H 125), Outdoor Skills: Learning Science in the Outdoors series (Science Signature Outcome Program).
Board and Poster Exhibits - These are displays that show educational information about a topic of interest. Board exhibits can hold objects such as fishing equipment or casts of animal tracks. Mount all board exhibits on 1/4" plywood, masonite, or similar panel no larger than 24" high by 24" wide. Poster exhibits should be on regular poster sheets, no larger than standard size (22" x 28") but half size, 22" x 14", is recommended.
Division 901 - 4-H Flops are Educational Pay Category #7
* Class 1 Conservation or wildlife flop in any class. Tell why it was a flop and what you learned as a result of it.
Division 340 - Wildlife and How They Live (Classes 1-4) Pay Category #5

Wildlife and How they Live (Classes 1- 4) are board or poster exhibits. Display may show any aspect of wildlife, wildlife habitat, or related conservation, restoration, or management. Examples: life history or other facts about one type of wildlife; how to manage wildlife on a farm or in town; managing habitat for one kind of wildlife; life requirements for one kind of wildlife during one season or through the year; wildlife study methods; wildlife behavior (example: when nesting, finding food, moving, etc.); habitats (examples: grasslands, wetlands, river or stream corridors) and what wildlife is found there; habitat needs for a specific kind of wildlife. For more ideas, refer to project booklets.

Class 1 Mammal Display

Class 2 Bird Display

Class 3 Fish Display

Class 4 Reptile or Amphibian Display

Class 5 Wildlife Connections - Board or poster exhibit. The purpose of this display is to show interconnections and related aspects among animals, plants, and other habitat components. All displays should show two or more interactions (connections) that occur between/among animals or between animals and their habitat. Displays might show how animals interact with other animals, with people, or with their habitat. Examples:1.Food chain display. Use pictures, drawings, or other items to illustrate the source of food energy and where it goes -who eats whom or what. Use arrows to show the direction of the energy (food) flow.2.Show the role of predators, scavengers, insect eaters, or others in nature.3.Show how wildlife numbers (populations) change through the year or with their habitat.4.Show predation, competition, or other behavioral interactions of wildlife.5.Choose one kind of wildlife and make observations through a season or year, keep notes of interactions, then make a display of what you saw.6.For more ideas, refer to project booklets.

Class 6 Wildlife Tracks - Board or diorama-type exhibit. There are two options. For both options, include a brief description of your experiences in making the tracks so the judge’s better understand what you did and learned. Positive casts (impressions as they would be in nature) are preferred.

1) Option 1 should show plaster-of-Paris tracks of five or more kinds of wildlife along with a picture or illustration of each kind of animal, (OR)

2) Option 2 should show two or more plaster-of-paris track of one specific kind of wildlife and should include a picture or illustration of the animal, what the animal may eat, and what may eat the animal. (OR)

3) Option 3 should show two tracks and include the animal’s habitat needs including preferred food, shelter, water, and space in addition to picture or illustration of the animal.

Class 7 Wildlife Knowledge Check - Use electrical circuits, pictures, or other methods of teaching wildlife identification or other wildlife related knowledge. Plan size and shape to fit transportation and display; maximum size 24 x 24 inches. Example: prepare a list of animals and questions about where each would most likely live. Rabbits - brushy areas along field borders; ducks - marshes, etc.

Class 8 Wildlife Diorama - Box must be no larger than 24" by 24". The exhibit might show a grassland, prairie, agricultural, woodland, riparian (stream or river corridor), wetland, and/or other area with wildlife habitat. Example: show a large unbroken grassland or prairie for area sensitive species such as meadowlarks, greater prairie chicken, lark bunting, grasshopper sparrows, Ferruginous hawk, burrowing owl, horned lark, upland sandpiper, or pronghorn; AND/OR show an area interspersed with several habitats such as windbreaks, farm fields, woods, waste areas, ditches, and pastures for edge adapted species such as white-tailed deer, northern bobwhite, ring-necked pheasants, mourning doves, fox, squirrels, cottontail rabbits, northern cardinals, or blue jays. Label the habitats displayed and at least 5 kinds of wildlife in their proper habitats.

Class 9 Wildlife Essay - Learn how to share educational information by writing. Choose a conservation or wildlife topic that interests you and write an essay about it. For example, write about a particular species of wildlife that you have observed or about the values of wildlife (commercial value, game value, genetic value, aesthetic value, ecological value, scientific value). You might write about wildlife on a farm, in town, in a backyard, at a backyard feeder, or at other places. You might write about hunting, fishing, or ethics and proper behavior for hunting or fishing. For other ideas, refer to project booklets. The essay should be between 100 and 1000 words long and should be typed, double spaced, or written so that it can be easily read. Standard size paper (8½ x 11) format preferred. You might use books, magazines, or personal interviews as resources, but you must give credit to all sources by listing them.

Class 10 Wildlife Values Scrapbook - Make a scrapbook about the various values of wildlife (game, genetic, commercial, aesthetic, ecological, scientific) following guidelines in the Wildlife Conservation project booklet.

Class 11 Wildlife Arts - The purpose of this class is to allow artistic exhibits that contain educational information about wildlife and conservation. Examples might include paintings, photographs, wood carvings, painted duck decoys, or songs or poems written by the exhibitor. Entries must be appropriate for fair display and no larger than 24" x 24". For example, paintings or photographs should be displayed in notebook format or mounted on a sturdy display panel. All entries must include a title and brief explanation of the purpose or message (what is the exhibit meant to show).


Division 342 - Wildlife Habitat Pay Category #5

Class 1 Houses - Make a house for wildlife. Example: bird house (bluebird, purple martin, wood duck, kestrel, barn owl, etc.) or bat house, no insect houses. Make the house functional so that hole size, dimensions, etc. are appropriate to fit the intended species’ needs. Include the following information: 1) the kinds of animal(s) for which the house is intended, 2) where and how the house should be located for best use, and 3) any seasonal maintenance needed.

Class 2 Feeders/Waters - Make a bird bath or feeder. Squirrel feeder okay; no insect feeders. Indicate the kinds of animal(s) for which the feeder or waterer is intended. Make the feeder or waterer functional so that it fits wildlife needs. Include the following information: 1) where and how the feeder or waterer should be located for best use, and 2) how it should be maintained. Tips: Check NebGuide on feeding birds.

Class 3 Wildlife Habitat Design - Board or poster exhibit. Choose a backyard, acreage, or farm, and design a habitat plan to meet the food, water, shelter, and space needs of at least three kinds of animals you would like to attract. Draw an outline of the area and show what plants or other habitat will be provided. Indicate how the various parts of your plan provide the desired habitat needs. You might include an aerial photo of the area if you have one. For ideas, check the wildlife Habitat Evaluation Handbook, Participant’s Manual (NE4H4300)

* Class 4 Pollinator Habitat can be built out of a variety of materials including, but not limited to: Small logs, 2x4’s cut into small pieces, twigs. MUST HAVE: a roof on top of structure, closed back with, and open front. CANNOT use pressure treated wood or Cedar to build pollinator habitat.
Division 343 - Harvesting Equipment Pay Category #5

Class 1 Fish Harvesting Equipment - Board exhibit. Display of equipment used in fish harvesting. Examples: fishing knots, hooks (with corks over ends for safety), lures. Label all items displayed. Include the following information: 1) purpose of each item, 2) when or where each item is used in relation to other equipment, and 3) any personal experiences you’ve had with the item(s).

Class 2 Build A Fishing Rod - Build your own fishing rod for exhibit and for fishing use. Rod building blanks and kits with instructions are available for this purpose. A fishing rod educational exhibit may not exceed 96" in length. Exhibit must be mounted on a board and labeled with the member’s name, county and class number. Include with the exhibit the following items as a brief attachment:

1) Explanation of cost of materials/components, where materials/components were purchased, how made, and number of hours required for construction.

2) Identify all parts.

Necessary components which must be included are grip, line guides (based on manufacturers specifications), guide wraps, and hook keeper. Reel seat needs to be aligned with guides, and guides aligned accurately down rod. Guide wraps of size A to D, nylon or silk thread.

The exhibit will be judged on: workmanship, labeling of parts (guides, etc.), correct information, and neatness.

Class 3 Casting Target - Make a casting target for exhibit and use, following guidelines in Fishing For Adventure manuals.

Class 4 Wildlife Harvesting Equipment Board Exhibit - Display of equipment used in harvesting wildlife. Ex: expended ammunition casings (no live ammunition permitted), steel traps, hide stretchers, fleshers, etc. For displays of shotguns, rifles, or bows, use drawings or pictures. Label all items displayed. Include in your exhibit the following information: 1) the purpose of each item, 2) when or where it is used in relation to other equipment, and 3) any personal experiences you’ve had with the item(s).

Class 5 Inventing Wildlife/Fish Harvesting Equipment, Aid or Accessory - Use engineering principles to invent or adapt equipment that helps you harvest fish or wildlife. This could include wildlife calls, adapted fishing pole for shallow water, a blind, decoys, etc. Share your drawing (or adapted plans), how the equipment works, how you tested it, and the results of testing your prototype and any adjustments you made.


Division 346 – Taxidermy

Pay Category #5

Class 1 Tanned Hides or Taxidermy - Any legal fish, bird, or other wild animal properly processed by the member. No requirement as to size or mounting. Include the following information: 1) the animal's name, and 2) information about exhibitor's personal field experiences, study, or observations that relate to the exhibit.
Division 347 - Shooting Sports

4-H Shooting Sports requires youth to be under the direct leadership of a certified 4-H Shooting Sports Leader in either shotgun, rifle (bb gun), archery, pistol, blackpowder/muzzleloader, and/or hunting skills. No firearms can be entered as an exhibit, however information can be shared through pictures.

Class 1 Shooting Aid or Accessory - Any item which helps the shooter/hunter better perform their sport. Examples: rifle sling, kneeling roll, arm guard, shotgun vest, target boxes, shooting stick, etc.

Class 2 Storage Case - an item with the purpose to safely hold a firearm, bow, ammunition, and/or arrows. Examples: soft sided shotgun case, quivers, firearm safe. Include your design or plans you adapted. Explain how the storage case is used.

Class 3 Practice Game or Activity - Invent or adapt an activity to practice or teach a project skill. Include pictures of youth playing the game, testimonials for 4-H members who played the game, what skill is being worked on, and directions for the game. Explain how you came up with the game or adapted it to fit the needs of your group members.

Class 4 Science, Engineering, Technology Advancement of Shooting Sports Essay or Display - Choose a specific area of shooting sports and share how it has advanced. Include a timeline and photos or illustrations. Keep your topic narrow and manageable. Essays are limited to 1000 words and should be on 8 ½” x 11" paper.

Class 5 Healthy Lifestyles Plan - Include a shooter’s diet and exercise plan, and how the 4-H member will benefit or improve from following the plan. Ideally, the 4-H member would follow the plan and include some journal entries about adaptions or improvements made while following the plan.

Class 6 Citizenship/Leadership Project - Share a display on a citizenship project or leadership project the 4-H member took on individually or with a group to improve some aspect related to 4-H Shooting Sports. Examples could be range development, conservation planting to attract wildlife, a camp, 4-H recruitment event. Include who benefitted from the project, what the 4-H member’s role was, and any results.

Class 8 Career Development/College Essay, Interview or Display - Research opportunities for careers related to this area or opportunities for college majors or college activities to help discover using project skills beyond a person’ 4-H career. Essays are limited to 1000 words and should be on 8 ½” x 11" paper. Interviews need to include a picture of the interviewee in their work setting, questions asked and a transcript of answers.

Class 9 Community Vitality Display - Explore the difference shooting sports and hunting make in keeping Nebraska vibrant especially in rural areas. Present facts and research in interesting way for the public to learn from.

Class 10 Ag Literacy: Value Added Agriculture Interview or Research Project - Explore how traditional ag producers are adding value to their production agriculture operations through conservation efforts, hunting, raising pheasants, shooting sports related tourism, etc. Present finding in an interesting way for the public to learn from.
Division 361 - Other Natural Resources Pay Category #5
Class 1 Design Your Own Exhibit in Natural Resources, Conservation, or Ecology. This class is for educational exhibits about natural resources, conservation, wildlife, or ecology that do not fit into other categories. Entries must be appropriate for fair display and no larger than 24" x 24". All entries must include a title and should be clear (brief explanation or other method) about the intended purpose or message - what the exhibit is meant to show. Think about accuracy, creativity, educational value for viewers, and evidence of exhibitor’s personal experiences and learning.
Department D - FORESTRY

General Information

The official reference for all forestry projects is the Tree Identification Manual which was recently revised and is available for purchase from UNL Marketplace. Other helpful forestry references include Trees of Nebraska, Leafing Out and Plant a Tree.



  • Display “boards” must be made from wood or wood composite, e.g. plywood, fiberboard, or masonite, 1/4" to ½" thick and no larger than 24" x 24". Display boards may be coated, e.g., painted or varnished on both sides to prevent warping.

  • Display “posters” must be made from a material, e.g. foam board or posterboard that will stand upright without buckling, and be no larger than 24" x 24".

  • Display "books" must measure no more than 16" x 16".

At least five of the ten samples in Class 2, 3, 4 and 5, must be from the list of 60 species described in the Tree Identification Manual. Samples must be from ten different tree species. For example Emerald Queen Maple and Crimson King Maple are both varieties the same species (Norway Maple), and thus have the same genus and species name, i.e. Acer platanoides. All samples must be from trees, NO shrubs. If more than ten samples are included in a display, only the first ten samples of the current year will be judged.

Remember that other general labeling standards apply. For example, scientific names are always italicized or underlined. Also, the first letter of a Genus name is always capitalized. The first letter of the species name is always lower case. When required, always indicate complete scientific names (Genus and species) and common names (e.g. Norway Maple), even when “variety names” are included. For example, the scientific name of Emerald Queen Maple is Acer platanoides and the common name is Norway maple. “Emerald Queen” may be included as the variety name, but variety names are not required.

How well the exhibitor follows written direction is an important factor in judging.
Division 901 - 4-H Flops are Educational Pay Category #7

* Class 2 Environmental & Earth Science (Department D) flop in any class. Tell why it was a flop and what you learned as a result of it.


Division 320 - Forestry Pay Category #7

Class 1 Design Your Own Exhibit - Prepare an educational exhibit about some aspect of trees, forests, or forestry that is of special interest to you. Possible topics include paper recycling, wild fire, forest products, forest wildlife, or forest pests. The only requirement is that the display must be no larger than 24" x 24" x 24". Photographs, drawings, samples, charts, posters, etc. can be used, but include enough information to adequately explain the topic. Your display should be substantially different from other display classes. Be as creative as you like.

Class 2 Leaf Display - The leaf display must include samples of “complete leaves” from at least ten different tree species. The display must include at least two samples each of simple leaves, compound leaves, and conifer leaves. Leaves should be pressed, dried, and mounted.

Collection: Whenever possible, collect leaves from mature trees. Collect leaves any time after they have reached full size, usually beginning in early summer. Leaf samples should be in good condition and representative of the average leaves on the tree. Keep in mind that shaded leaves are often much larger than normal. Carefully remove leaves from the twig with the entire petiole or rachis intact. After collection, fresh leaf samples can be temporarily stored within the pages of an old magazine, but they should be properly pressed and dried for display. Be sure to record pertinent information during collection.

Mounting: Leaves may be displayed in a notebook or on a display board. Any method may be used to mount leaves, e.g. wire, glue, tape, staples, plastic bags, but be sure all their features can be clearly identified. Labeling: The label for each sample must include:

1. Common name

2. Scientific name

3. Leaf type

4. Leaf arrangement (for broadleaf trees)

5. Leaf composition (for broadleaf trees)

6. Exhibitor’s name

7. Collection date

8. Collection location (be specific, state and county at a minimum).

If a twig is included with a sample, indicate “twig included” on the label. For example, the twig may be included with an eastern red cedar sample because the leaves are very small and difficult to remove from the twig.

Supplemental information, e.g. general uses, common products, fall color, etc., may be included with the display to enhance its educational value.

Class 3 Twig Display - The twig display must include twig samples from at least 10 different tree species. The display must include at least two samples each of both opposite and alternate leaf arrangements from broadleaf trees.



Collection: Twig samples should be collected during the dormant season (November-April) when the buds are mature. Twig samples must be at least six inches long and exhibit buds. Leaves must be removed and side branches must be trimmed to less than one inch in length.

Mounting: Twigs must be mounted on a display board. Any method, e.g. wire, glue, tape, staples, plastic bags, may be used to mount twigs, but be sure all features can be clearly identified. The non-terminal end must be cut at a slant so the pith can be seen.

Labeling: The label for each sample must include:

1. Common name

2. Scientific name

3. Leaf arrangement (for broadleaf trees)

4. Exhibitor’s name

5. Collection date

6. Collection location (be specific, state and county at a minimum).

Supplemental information, e.g. general uses, tree characteristics, etc., may be included with the display to enhance its educational value.

Class 4 Seed Display - The seed display must include seed samples from at least 10 different tree species.

Collection: Tree seeds should be collected at the time of year when they mature, which varies widely depending upon tree species. For example, Silver Maple seeds mature in May while Red Oak acorns do not mature until September. Seed samples should be free of insect or disease symptoms. Remember to display seeds, not fruit. For example, the seed of honey locust is enclosed in a pod. Remove and display the seed, not just the pod. It is acceptable to display the fruit with the seed, but clearly label each.

Mounting: Seeds may be displayed in a variety of ways, e.g. mounted on a display board, displayed in jars in a rack, etc., but they must be securely mounted and easily viewed. Be as creative as you like.

Labeling: The labels for each sample must include:

1. Common name

2. Scientific name

3. Type of fruit, if known (e.g. samara, pod, nut, legume, etc.)

4. Exhibitor’s name

5. Collection date

6. Collection location (be specific, state and county at a minimum).

Supplemental information, e.g. maturity date, average number of seeds in the fruit, etc., may be included to enhance its educational value.

Class 5 Wood Display - The wood display must include wood samples from at least 10 different tree species.

Preparation: Samples may be of any shape, e.g. sections from a board, wood cylinders turned on a lathe, horizontal or vertical cross sections of a small log with bark attached, etc. but all samples should be the same shape, e.g. all wood cylinders or all sections of a board. Each sample can be no larger than 4"x4"x4". Cut surfaces should be sanded to show the grain. Treating samples with a clear finish (no stain) is optional.

Mounting: Samples may be displayed in a variety of ways, e.g. mounted on a display board, displayed in a box or rack, etc., but they must be securely mounted and easily viewed. Be as creative as you like.

Labeling: The label for each sample must include:

1. Common name

2. Scientific name

3. Wood type (softwood or hardwood)

4. Exhibitor’s name

5. Collection date

6. Collection location (be specific, state and county at a minimum).

Supplemental information, e.g. common products, density, etc., may be included with the display to enhance its educational value.

Class 6 Cross Section Display - A disc cut from a tree, species listed in the Tree Identification manual. The sample must be collected within one year of the fair judging day. The disc must measure 6" to 12" in diameter and one to three inches thick. The bark should be firmly attached, which may be difficult if the tree was dead when the disc was cut. Sand at least one side of the disc so the grain can be seen. If the disc is treated with a clear finish, both sides must be treated to minimize warping. As the disc dries, some cracking or checking can be expected and is allowed.

Labeling: The following parts must be clearly and accurately labeled on the cross section with pins, paper tags, or some other form of identification: a) pith; b) heartwood; c) sapwood; d) one growth ring (beginning and end); e) cambium; and f) bark.

A separate label attached to the back of the disc must include:

1) Common name

2) Scientific name

3) Tree classification (softwood or hardwood)

4) Age (of the cross section)

5) Exhibitor’s name

6) Collection date

7) Collection location (be specific, state and county at a minimum).

Class 7 Parts of a Tree - This project is only for ages 8-11. Prepare a poster, no larger than 24" x 24" that clearly identifies the main external parts of any tree:

a) Truck

b) Crown


c) Roots

d) Leaves

e) Flowers

f) Fruit


g) Buds

h) Bark


Identifying other internal parts, e.g. phloem, xylem, cambium, annual ring, pith, etc. is optional. Attach a separate label on the back of the poster that includes the exhibitor’s name and age.

Class 8 Living Tree Display - A living tree seedling grown by the exhibitor from seed in the display container. The seed must be from a species listed in the Tree Identification manual. The seedling must be 60 days to one year old (on judging day). The display container must contain at least 8" of soil (potting mix or suitable natural soil), have drainage holes, and a drain pan to catch drainage water.



Labeling: A waterproof label must be attached and include:

1) Common name

2) Scientific name

3) Seed treatments (if any)

4) Planting date

5) Emergence date

6) Exhibitor's name.

Supplemental information about the tree, e.g. where the seed was collected, growth measurements, uses for that species, etc., may be included in an attached notebook, poster, etc. to enhance the educational value. Supplemental information will be an important factor in judging.


Division 913 - Outdoor Adventures Pay Category #7

4-H members enrolled in the Outdoor Adventure Series can exhibit in any of these classes with a limit of four classes. The 4-H project/manual name will help you as a reference which manual to find more information in about that fair exhibit. All posters need to be 14” x 22” or smaller.


Hiking Trails

* Class 1 GORP - Design your own mix of GORP. Include a recipe card with ingredients. Submit a sandwich size bag or comparable size container of GORP with your recipe card.

* Class 2 Backpack Selection - Select and pack a backpack for a day hike. Include a picture of you wearing it properly adjusted, and a paper explaining what is in the backpack and the purpose of each item.

* Class 3 Hiking Fashion & Walkin’ - Make a poster with pictures showing your choices of clothing for the layering principle: core, second, third, and outer. Also include your footprint and what type of foot you have. Include the appropriate hiking shoes with each outfit.

* Class 4 First Aid Kit - Make a first aid kit. Include a list of “First Aid Supplies” and what each item is used for.

* Class 5 Leave No Trace or Protect Local Resource Poster - Design a standard size poster or a flier on the Leave No Trace concepts or protecting a local resource. For ideas visit lnt.org.

* Class 6 Hiking/Camping Scrapbook or Journal - Design a scrapbook recording your trips with pictures and narrations. Include other memories you have from the trip and what you learned or discovered on each trip, sketches of what you see.

* Class 7 Weather Safety - Choose from weather safety directions and where to take shelter, or what different cloud formations signal. Make a poster with the previous information, and tips of how to stay safe for each type of weather.

* Class 8 Footprint Identification - Make a guide to take with you hiking that helps you identify different types of footprints you can come across on a trail. Keep it small, lightweight, and weather resistant for your backpack.

* Class 9 Bear Bags - Make a system to keep food away from bears/rodents in the wilderness.


Camping Adventures

* Class 10 Overnight Camping Trip Plan - Plan an overnight camping trip taking into consideration all the questions on page 7 of the manual for Part I of this exhibit. For part II, share a picture story of how your plan was carried out. The format can be a report, binder, poster, or powerpoint.

* Class 11 Get in Gear Demo - Design a powerpoint or movie demonstrating how to use one or two basic camping tools. Include the written copy of demonstration outline on page 12 of manual.

* Class 12 Camping Knots - Make six different knots out of rope. Attach to a board (foam board or plywood) 22” x 18” or smaller. Label the name of the knot and its’ use in camping, backpacking, or hiking.

* Class 13 Leave No Trace Community Service - Organize a cleanup or beautification of a park, camping area, or hiking trail. Share your steps in setting it up, organizing volunteers, and before and after pictures. The format can be a binder, poster, or powerpoint.

* Class 14 Shelter - Create a display or poster about different types of shelters, or on the care of camping shelters. See page 19 in manual.

* Class 15 Menu Planning - Prepare a menu for a three day camping trip. Use the resources at mypyramid.gov to plan a balanced menu. Prepare one of the foods on your menu, and turn in with your menu plan on 8 ½ x 11” paper.

* Class 16 Water Research - Conduct research on the water in a camping area. Prepare a report that includes your findings along with recommendations for keeping water clean. See pages 26-27 in manual.

* Class 17 Letter to Decision Maker - Choose an environmental issue you feel passionate about, write a letter to your representative or senator, urging them to protect the environment and keep lands wild. Print your letter (or email) on a sheet of paper, and any response sent back to you.

* Class 18 Recycle System - Create a system to recycle when in the wilderness such as aluminum, plastics, paper, food scraps, etc.


Backpacking Expeditions
* Class 19 Create a video, photo story, or poster on how you selected your backpack and made adjustments.

* Class 20 Non-Tent Backpacking Shelter - Create a shelter of your own design to use when backpacking in wilderness areas. Include a drawing of your plans, and a picture of your shelter set up.

* Class 21 Leave No Trace Chart - See pages 22-23 in manual. Make a chart of the Leave No Trace principles for different biomes. Present it on a standard size poster.

* Class 22 Backpacking Pyramid - Create your own game that can be played when out on the trail. Include where your idea game from, directions on how to play, and the game itself or resources needed to play the game (such as leaves if a tree identification game).

* Class 23 Fitness Program - Create a 3 month fitness plan for a backpacking/hiking trip. Make a calendar of what you will do each day. Include a title page with your name, your goal of physical fitness, and describe the hike you are training for.

* Class 24 Backpacking Map - Using a topographical map, design a hike. Include landmarks, roads, shelter, and water resources. Draw out your route with starting point and orienting arrows. (pages 28-29 in manual).


Department D – AGRONOMY
The purpose of these exhibits is to demonstrate to the public the benefits from the study and application of crop, range and soil sciences to solving problems in management, conservation, sustainability and environmental protection. For guidelines on specific projects, refer to appropriate project manuals.
Department D - CROP PRODUCTION
Individuals in the Crop Production, Field Crops projects may exhibit grain or plants or prepare an educational display representing their project.

A) IMPORTANT: A two page (maximum) essay must include the exhibitors name and address, county, plant hybrid or variety, plant population, whether crop production was irrigated or dryland, and general information including farm cropping history, soil type and weather effects. The essay also must include an economic analysis of the project, listing individual expenses and income, on a per acre basis. Other topics to discuss are the selection of variety or hybrid, impacts of tillage and conservation practices, inputs (fuel, fertilizer, irrigation, labor, pesticides, etc.), any observations made during the growing season, and what you learned from your crops project.

B) The essay counts as 50% of the total when judged. Essay must be the original work of the individual exhibitor. Attach the essay to the entry in a clear plastic cover such that it can be read without removing it from the cover. In addition to the essay, grain and plant exhibits will be judged on condition, appearance (i.e. disease and insect damage, grain fill), uniformity (size, shape, color, maturity) and quality of exhibit.

C) Grain exhibits must be one gallon per sample. Grain exhibits harvested in the fall (e.g. corn or soybeans) may be from the previous year's project. Display containers will be furnished.

D) Plant exhibits, with the exception of ears of corn, must be the result of the current year’s project:

• Corn - Ten ears or three stalks (cut at ground level with no roots or soil and bound together)

• Grain Sorghum - Four stalks (cut at ground level and bound together)

• Soybeans - Six stalks (cut at ground level and bound together)

• Small Grains (oats, barley, wheat, triticale) - sheaf of heads two inches in diameter at top tie with stems about 24" long

• Other crops (alfalfa, millet, etc.) - Sheaf of stems three inches in diameter at top tied with stems cut at ground level or half size small square bale.


Division 901 - 4-H Flops are Educational Pay Category #7

* Class 3 Agronomy flop in any class. Tell why it was a flop and what you learned as a result of it.


Department D - Division 750 - Grain or Plant Exhibits Pay Category #7

Class 1 Corn (includes yellow, white, pop, waxy or any other type)

Class 2 Soybeans

Class 3 Oats

Class 4 Wheat

Class 5 Any other crop (includes grain sorghum, alfalfa, millets, barley, rye, triticale, amaranth, dry beans, sugar beet, mung bean, canola, forage sorghum, safflower, etc.


Department D - Division 750 - Displays

The purpose of the display is to tell an educational story to those that view that display. The display is a visual representation (pictures, charts, graphs) no larger than 28" wide by 28" tall on plywood or poster board. The display should be neatly titled. Make sure to label display with exhibitor’s name, address, and county on back side. Explain pictures and graphs clearly and concisely. Consider creativity and neatness.

Each display must have a one page essay (minimum) explaining why the exhibitor chose the area of display and what they learned from their project. Include any references used. The essay should be in a clear plastic cover with the exhibitor’s name outside.

Class 6 Crop Production Display - The purpose of this class is to allow original and creative exhibits that contain educational information about crop production aspects, such as crop scouting, alternative crops, pest management, etc.

Class 7 Crop Technology Display - Display information about aspects of technology used in crop production, such as genetic engineering, crop breeding, GPS, yield mapping, computers, etc.

Class 8 Crop End Use Display - Display information about the final product or end uses for a crop, including examples of products. ( i.e. corn can be processed into livestock feed, ethanol, plastics, etc. or soybeans can be processed into livestock feed, ethanol, plastics, etc. or soybeans can be processed into bio-diesel, pet bedding, crayons, oil, etc.)

Class 9 Water or Soil Display - Display information about ways to protect or conserve water and soil resources.

Class 10 Career Interview Display - The purpose of this class is to allow youth to investigate a career in agronomy. Youth should interview one person that works with crops about such topics as, what parts of their job do they enjoy or dislike, why did they choose that career, what was their education, etc. Include a picture of the person interviewed.


Department G - WEED SCIENCE
Any individual in the Conservation, Environment 1, 2 or 3, Range, Reading the Range 1 or Using Nebraska Range 2, or Crop Production, Field Crops projects may exhibit a weed book or weed display. The book cover and majority of specimens must represent this year's work. For assistance identifying plants, participants can use Nebraska Department of Agriculture’s Weeds of Nebraska and the Great Plains (1994) or Weeds of the Great Plains (2003).
Department G - Division 751 - Books Pay Category #7

A). Display one plant on the book cover (no label required on cover specimen). Plants must be mounted on sheets that are no larger than 14" wide and 14" high. Proper plant mount should include root as well as stem and leaf tissue. Plants should be glued rather than taped and the mounts should be protected with a clear cover.

B). Exhibits will be judged based on completeness of plant mount, accuracy of identification, label, neatness, and conformity to exhibit requirements.

C). Each completed mount must have the following information (see example below) in the lower right corner of the mounting sheet: 1) Scientific name (in italic or underlined), with authority, 2) Common name, 3) County of collection, 4) Collection date, 5) Collector’s name, 6) Personal collection number, indicating the order that plants were collected in your personal collection, 7) Other information depending on class selected, i.e., noxious, life form. This information should be typed of printed neatly.

Class 1 Weed Identification Book - A collection of a minimum of 15 plant mounts including at least two of the following prohibited noxious weeds (Canada thistle, musk thistle, plumeless thistle, salt cedar, leafy spurge, purple loosestrife, diffuse knapweed, spotted knapweed, Japanese knotweed, bohemian knotweed, giant knotweed, sericea lespedeza, or phragmites), and at least five weeds that are a problem primarily in lawns.

Class 2 Life Span Book - A collection of seven perennial, one biennial, and seven annual weeds.


Department G - Division 751 - Displays Pay Category #7

The purpose of the display is to tell an educational story to those that view the display. The display is a visual representation (pictures, charts, graphs) no larger than 28" by 28" on plywood or posterboard. The display should be neatly titled. Make sure to label display with exhibitor’s name, address, and county on back side. Explain pictures and graphs clearly and concisely.



Each display must have a one page essay explaining why the exhibitor chose the area of display and what they learned from their project. Include any references used. The essay should be in a clear plastic cover with the exhibitor’s name outside.

Class 3 Weed Display - The purpose of this class is to allow original and creative exhibits that contain educational information about weeds, such as interesting information about a weed species, the effects of week control, herbicide resistant weeds, what makes a weed a weed, or uses for weeds.



Department D - RANGE MANAGEMENT
A. Individuals in Reading the Range Unit 1 project may exhibit in Classes 1-5, and 8.

B. Individuals in the Using Nebraska's Range Unit 2 project may exhibit in Classes 1-8.

C. Each exhibit must be properly identified with Unit and Class.

D. All plant displays and display covers must be the result of the current year's work.

E. Plant identification and lists of appropriate plants in each category (grasses, forbs, shrubs, introduced seeded pasture and hay plants, and grass-like plants) can be found in the Range Judging Handbook and Contest Guide, Common Grasses of Nebraska (EC 170), and Common Forbs and Shrubs of Nebraska (EC89-118).

F. The purpose of these exhibits is to demonstrate to the public the benefits from the study and application of crop, weed, range and soil sciences to solving problems in management, conservation, sustainability and environment protection. For guidelines on specific projects refer to appropriate project manuals.


Department D - Division 330 - Books Pay Category #7

A). For books, plants must be mounted on sheets that are 14" wide x 14" high. Plants should be glued rather than taped and the mounts should be protected with a clear cover. Proper plant mount should include root as well as stem and leaf tissue.

B). Exhibits will be judged based on completeness of plant mount, accuracy of identification, labeling, neatness and conformation to project requirements

C). Each completed mount must have the following information (see example below) in the lower right corner of the mounting sheet:

1) Scientific name (in italic or underlined), with authority

2) Common name

3) County of collection

4) Collection date

5) Collector’s name

6) Personal Collection number, indicating order the plants were collected in your personal collection.

7) Other information, depending on class selected, i.e., value and importance, life span, growth season, origin, major types of range plants.

This information should be typed or printed neatly.

Class 1 Value and Importance for Livestock Forage and Wildlife Habitat and Food Book - A collection of 12 different plants, with four classified as high value, four as medium value, and four as low value for livestock forage, wildlife habitat, or wildlife food. Value and importance classifications can be found in the Range Judging Handbook and Contest Guide (EC150. Revised July 2009) on pages 3 through 6. Plants can consist of any combination of grasses, grass-like plants, forbs, or shrubs. Assemble plant mounts in order of high, medium, and low value and importance. Label each plant mount with its value and importance classifications for each of the three areas; Livestock Forage, Wildlife Habitat, Wildlife Food.

Class 2 Life Span Book - A collection of six perennial plants and six annual plant mounts selected from grasses or forbs.

Class 3 Growth Season Book - A collection of six cool-season grass mounts and six warm-season grass mounts.

Class 4 Origin Book - A collection of plant mounts of six native range grasses and six introduced grasses. Introduced grasses are not from North America and are often used to seed pastures.

Class 5 Major Types of Range Plants Book - A collection of plant mounts of three grasses, three forbs, three grass like, and three shrubs.

Class 6 Range Plant Collection Book - A collection of 12 range plant mounts with something in common (i.e. poisonous to cattle, or historically used as food by Native Americans, or dye plants, or favorite antelope forage, etc.). Include a short paragraph in the front of the book which describes what the plants have in common and why you have chosen to collect them.


Department D - Division 300 - Displays

The purpose of the display is to tell an educational story to those that view the display. The display is a visual representation (pictures, charts, graphs) no larger than 28" on plywood or poster board. The display should be neatly titled. Make sure to label display with exhibitor’s name, address, and county on back side.

Class 7 Parts of a Range Plant Poster - Mount a range plant on a poster board. Label all the plant parts. Include the plant label in the lower right corner. Put your name and 4-H county on the back of the poster.
Department D - Division 330 - Boards Pay Category #7

Boards should be no larger than 30" wide by 36" tall or if hinged in the middle a maximum of 60" wide by 36" tall. Boards should be adequately labeled.

Class 8 Range Plant Board - Will include 25 range forage species important to a particular county.

Class 9 Special Study Board - A display of the results of a clipping study, a degree of use study, or a range site study, etc.



Class 10 Junior Rancher Board - This exhibit should include a ranch map with a record book or an appropriate educational display on some phase of rangeland or livestock management.

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