English Learners in Middle School: Dispelling Myths about esl



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English Learners in Middle School: Dispelling Myths about ESL

  • District 6
  • English Learner Summit
  • June 6, 2008
  • Maria Whang, EL Advisor Marisol Muñiz, High Point Expert

The Myths

  • Middle School placement in ESL will do irreparable harm to our matriculating elementary English learners
    • Never graduate
    • Are unable to meet A-G requirements
    • Are precluded from access to the university
  • ESL moves the student backwards; it’s not standards-based and is generally a waste of time

From the Council of Mexican American Administrators (CMAA) position paper in support of the Achieving A+ Summit December, 2007

  • “… the secondary curriculum for all English Learners (ESL + PRP) must be standards based, grade appropriate and rigorous.
  • As it stands now, English Learners who are placed in ESL classes in Middle School and High School are precluded access to the University, as they are not part of the A-G curriculum.”

Presentation Outcomes

  • Become aware of English learner middle school data
  • Review common understandings (policy, programs and services) related to ELs in Middle School
  • Explore the comprehensiveness, coherence and the rigor of the ESL curriculum
  • R30California State Language Census Report
  • K-12 English Learner Numbers
  • Middle School EL Numbers
  • 49,115
  • Total EL
  • ESL
  • PRP
  • ESL%
  • PRP%
  • 6th grade
  • 17,042
  • 10,115
  • 6,927
  • 59%
  • 41%
  • 7th grade
  • 15,360
  • 8,122
  • 7,238
  • 53%
  • 47%
  • 8th grade
  • 14,827
  • 4,573
  • 10,254
  • 31%
  • 69%
  • Middle School Totals
  • 47,229
  • 22,810
  • 24,419
  • 48%
  • 52%
  • LAUSD’s Two English Learner (EL) Categories
  • ESL students (English as a Second Language) and PRP students (Preparation for Reclassification Program)
  • Data sources: DSS FALL NORM DAY 2007-2008

Reclassification:

  • A Five Year District Trend
  • A Five Year State Comparison

3 Year High Point Evaluation Report CONCLUSIONS

  • Schools had the capacity to implement High Point
  • High Point was highly implemented in more than 50% of the classrooms
  • When highly implemented, the curriculum had a positive influence on:
    • Student behavior
    • Classroom management practices
    • Instructional practices
    • Student performance
  • For the complete reports go to LAUSD website (http://notebook.lausd.net) ; click on Offices then Program Evaluation and Research Branch → Publications → Research Reports → Evaluation of High Point

MEMORANDUM: MEM-2545.2 SCHEDULING ENGLISH LEARNERS AND STAFFING

    • Three Program Options for ELs
    • Access to Core & ELD
    • Scheduling and Staffing
    • In School Intervention (Enabling & ELS)
    • BTB Intervention for ESL 1A thru 2B

REFERENCE GUIDE:REF 3494.1 PLACEMENT of MATRICULATING ELs in MIDDLE SCHOOL and HIGH SCHOOL ELD CURRICULUM

      • Basis for placement: DPI code from elementary school
      • Additional criteria to determine placement:
        • CELDT scores
        • CST results from Spring, 2005 in English/Language Arts (or 2006 if available)
      • High school placement by course passed
      • Limited DPI use in secondary for new enrollees

Elementary to Middle School

    • Matriculating English Learner Placement Chart
  • OVERALL
  • CELDT SCORE
  • CST
  • Eng/LA
  • DPI
  • CODE
  • COURSE PLACEMENT
  • 1
  • 1
  • Beginning ESL 1A or
  • Introduction to ESL A/B
  • 1
  • 2
  • Beginning ESL 1B
  • 1
  • 3
  • Beginning ESL 1B
  • 2
  • A
  • Intermediate ESL 2A
  • 3 or 4
  • A
  • Intermediate ESL 2B
  • 2
  • B
  • Intermediate ESL 2B
  • 3 or 4
  • B
  • Advanced ESL 3
  • 3 or less
  • C
  • Advanced ESL 3
  • 4 or 5
  • Basic
  • A-C, E
  • Grade-level PRP English
  • 3-5
  • Prof. or Adv.
  • A-C
  • Grade-level PRP English
    • Can also be used to guide high school placement (newcomers & out of district)

1st Semester ESL Enrollment Fall Norm Day ‘07

  •  
  • ESL 1A
  • ESL 1B
  • ESL 2A
  • ESL 2B
  • ESL 3
  • ESL 4
  • GRADE 6
  • 637
  • 705
  • 2,875
  • 3,304
  • 2,594
  • 93
  • GRADE 7
  • 412
  • 371
  • 927
  • 1,417
  • 2,772
  • 2,223
  • GRADE 8
  • 390
  • 263
  • 534
  • 581
  • 1,340
  • 1,465
  • GRADE 9
  • 1,068
  • 638
  • 782
  • 488
  • 877
  • 632
  • GRADE 10
  • 175
  • 421
  • 790
  • 559
  • 536
  • 384
  • GRADE 11
  • 24
  • 42
  • 205
  • 372
  • 587
  • 438
  • GRADE 12
  • 3
  • 3
  • 22
  • 21
  • 88
  • 138
  • ALL GRADE
  • LEVELS
  • 2,709
  • 2,443
  • 6,135
  • 6,742
  • 8,794
  • 5,373

ESL Courses Aligned to High Point

  • ESL Courses
  • High Point ESL Textbooks
  • Intro ESL A/B
  • High Point The Basics
  • (Lakeside School)
  • Beginning ESL 1A
  • High Point The Basics
  • Beginning ESL 1B
  • Intermediate ESL 2A
  • High Point Level A
  • Intermediate ESL 2B
  • High Point Level B
  • Advanced ESL 3
  • High Point Level C
  • AND Core Literature
  • Advanced ESL 4

Examining Level B Curriculum for ESL 2B

Reading Instruction

  • In High Point

Reading Instructional Structure

  • The pattern for reading instruction in High Point is as follows:
  • Prepare to read
  • Read the selection
  • Respond

Prepare to Read The Keeping Quilt

  • Activate Prior Knowledge
  • Key Vocabulary
  • Reading Strategy
  • Level B, pp. T76-T86

Prepare to Read

  • Activate Prior Knowledge
    • Brainstorm Traditions
    • What traditions does your family have?
  • Day
  • of the
  • Dead
  • Wearing
  • red
  • Throwing
  • rice
  • traditions
  • Level B, pp. T76

Prepare to Read

  • Apron
  • Babushka
  • Bouquet
  • Bride
  • Celebrate
  • Engaged
  • Husband
  • Nightdress
  • Quilt
  • Tablecloth
  • Wedding huppa
  • Key Vocabulary
  • Locate and use Definition
  • Level B, pp. T76

Prepare to Read

  • Reading Strategy
  • Preview and Make Predictions
  • Level B, pp. T76
  • Transparency 18
  • Yellow Handout

Read the Selection The reading is divided into 3 parts: Each part includes:

  • 1. Pre-Reading Strategy
    • Identify Genre
  • 2. Strategy Focus
    • Make and Confirm predictions
  • 3. Vocabulary
    • Use New words in context
  • 4. Comprehension
    • Before you move on:
    • Think and discuss
  • 5. Grammar Minilesson
    • Past Tense Verbs
    • Irregular past Tense Verbs
    • Future Tense Verbs
  • Level B, pp. T78-T83

Respond

  • Check your understanding:
    • Sum it Up (Pg. 84)
    • Think it Over (Pg. 84)
  • Language Arts and Literature Connection
    • Grammar in Context (Pg. 85)
    • Literary Analysis (Pg. 85)
  • Content Area Connection
    • Fine arts and Technology (Pg. 86)
    • Social Studies and Technology (Pg. 86)
  • Label B, pp, T84-T86

Formative Assessment Selection Test

  • A selection test is administered after each reading selection:
  • Concepts and Vocabulary
  • Reading Strategy
  • Reading Comprehension
  • Grammar in Context
  • Writing in Response to Literature
  • TESAB, Pgs. 51-52

Summative Assessment End of Unit test

  • An end of unit test is administered at the end of each unit
  • Vocabulary
  • Reading and Literary Analysis
  • Language Skills
  • Process and Strategies
  • Written Composition
  • Blue packet

The Writing Process in High Point

The Writing Process

  • Although there are common elements, instructional steps in the writing process differ at each level in High Point.
  • The major differences are:
  • Basics
  • Writing process not as defined; limited attention to peer conference; focuses on sentences and paragraphs
  • Level A
  • Includes “Write Together” step; moves from paragraph to short essay
  • Level B
  • Moves from short essays to multi-paragraph writing
  • Level C
  • Focuses on multi-paragraph writing

The Writing Process in High Point

  • Writing a Personal History
  • Level B, Unit 2

Writing Instruction

  • Level B, pp. T132-T138
  • Level B, pp. T410
  • Comprehensive and well-sequenced
  • Integrated throughout the unit
  • Brings together all of the students’ skills

Writing Project Structure

  • Level B, pp. T132-T138
  • Predictable Pattern of Instruction
  • Introduce the mode/genre
  • Introduce the writing process
    • ◊Prewrite
    • ◊Draft
    • ◊Revise
    • ◊Edit and Proofread
    • ◊Publish

Clear Expectations

  • TESAB, pg. 114, Level B, Unit 2
  • Writing Assessment Rubric
  • What are the criteria for this writing assessment?
  • What are the characteristics of a quality paper?

The Writing Process

  • Introduce the mode
    • Discuss the mode
    • Study the professional model
    • Explore text structure
  • Study a student writing model
    • Listen for features
    • Analyze and evaluate
  • Close and assess
  • Level B, p. T132-133
  • Transparencies 29 & 30
  • Green Handout

Prewrite: Writing Prompt

  • Write a personal history to tell an elementary school class about your experiences. Be sure to express your feelings.
  • Level B, p. T134

Prewrite: Brainstorm Ideas

  • Level B, p. T134
  • People, Places, and Events
  • Why They Are Important
  • My Feelings
  • We liked the same things. We played sports and helped each other.
  • He was my best friend. I miss him the most of all my friends.
  • New Delhi, India
  • My first home. I lived there until I was nine.
  • I miss my family there. I miss playing cricket. I don’t miss the noisy, crowded city.
  • Going to a professional cricket match
  • It was a special trip with my mom and dad.
  • I miss going to games with Mom and Dad. I also miss watching and playing cricket. No one in the U.S. even knows how to play the game!

Prewrite: F.A.T.P Chart

  • Unlock the writing prompt:
  • Form: ____________________________
  • Audience: _________________________
  • Topic: ____________________________
  • Purpose: __________________________
  • Level B, p. T134

Prewrite: Organize with the Transparency

  • Organize your ideas:
  • Use a timeline to list important events in your life.
  • Use a chart to compare your life in the U.S. with your life in the country where you came from.
  • Make a list of things you liked as you were growing up.
  • Level B, p. T134

Prewrite: Organize with the Transparency

  • TIME LINE OF PERSONAL HISTORY
  • Transparency 29
  • Green packet

Prewrite: Close and Assess

  • Level B, p. T134
  • Reflect and evaluate:
  • Work with a partner to answer these questions:
    • How did listening to your partner’s ideas help you form your ideas?
    • Have you listed enough information?
    • Are your dates, place names, and people’s names correct? Check with a family member.

Five paragraph essay

  • Introductory Paragraph
  • Three Body Paragraphs
  • Conclusion Paragraph

Draft: Write the Beginning

  • Level B, p. T135
  • Write an introductory sentence in the first person, using the pronouns I, my, me, we, our, or us.
  • Write three sentences that name the events in your life that you will describe in your body paragraphs.
  • Writer’s Craft: Introductory Paragraph Structure

Draft: Writer’s Craft

  • Writer’s Craft: Body Paragraph Structure
  • Write an introductory sentence in the first person, using the pronouns I, my, me, we, our, or us.
  • Write three sentences giving three events in your life. Use first person pronouns. Add details such as dates, place names, and people’s names. Express your emotions during those events.
  • Level B, p. T135
  • Transparency 31
  • Green packet

Draft: Write an Ending

  • Level B, p. T135
  • Write a concluding paragraph:
  • Write an ending paragraph to leave your reader with a final thought about your experiences. Express your feelings about them.

Draft: Close and Assess

  • Level B, p. T135
  • Reflect and evaluate:
  • Work with a partner to answer these questions:
    • Read through your draft. Does it let your reader know how you feel about your experiences?
    • Are your sentences detailed and well-organized?

Revise: Reread Your Draft

  • Level B, p. T136
  • Review your FATP. The form, audience, topic and purpose should be clear in your paragraph.
  • Do the supporting details of your paragraph tell about three important experiences?

Revise: Conduct a Peer Conference

  • Work with a partner to review your paragraph.
  • Use the revision marks and questions from Transparency 32 as a guide for your feedback to your partner.
  • Transparency 32
  • Green handout
  • Level B, p. T136

Revise: Conduct a Peer Conference

  • Transparency 32
  • Green packet

Revise: Mark Your Changes

  • Level B, p. T136
  • Decide what changes you will make.
  • Use the revising marks to show your revisions.

Revise: Close and Assess

  • Level B, p. T136
  • Reflect on these questions:
  • Did your peers like what you wrote? What did they suggest you change?
  • Did you find you had to do a lot of rewriting?
  • Did you include all the thoughts and feelings you wanted to?

Revise: Grammar in Context

  • Level B, p. T137
  • Teach verb tenses
  • Cooperative learning activity
  • Practice
  • Close and assess

Edit and Proofread: Check for Mistakes

  • Capitalization
  • Spelling
  • Punctuation
  • Level B, p. T138
  • Transparency 33
  • Green packet

Edit and Proofread: Check Your Verbs

  • Level B, p. T138
  • Look for the correct use of verb tenses.

High Point Rubric Parts

Language Acquisition Assessments

Language Acquisition Assessments

  • What patterns or structures do you need to know in order to…
  • …give driving directions?
  • …order from a menu?
  • …retell a story?
  • …describe your dream house?

The Best Practice

  • Oral language instruction and practice opportunities exist throughout the unit.
  • All LAAs are opportunities for structured oral practice.
  • The 2 recommended LAAs can be revisited as formal assessments.
  • Build Language and Vocabulary Lessons have the targeted language functions and structures for upcoming LAA.
  • Students should be aware where needed skills occur within the unit.

Oral Language Assessment

  • Function
  • How language is used to communicate
  • Vocabulary
  • The words needed to communicate ideas

Language Acquisition Assessments

  • Language Function
  • – the purpose for communicating
  • Language Patterns and Structures – the required words, phrases, sentence forms, and types of grammar, used to construct the oral response
  • LAA Rubric
  • FUNCTION
  • PATTERN & STRUCTURE
  • VOCABULARY
  • 4
  • Student effectively performs the function.
  • Student clearly expresses the targeted pattern/structure in a variety of ways.
  • Student uses a variety of effective vocabulary, including words from the unit.
  • 3
  • Student performs the function.
  • Student adequately expresses the targeted pattern/structure.
  • Student uses adequate vocabulary, including words from the unit.
  • 2
  • Student does not adequately perform the function.
  • Student does not clearly express the targeted pattern/structure.
  • Student uses limited vocabulary or uses vocabulary incorrectly.
  • 1
  • Student makes no attempt or offers a non-verbal response.
  • Student does not express the targeted pattern/structure.
  • Student makes no attempt to use appropriate vocabulary.
  • TESAB Level B, Pg. 138

The Keeping Quilt

  • Language Acquisition Assessment
  • Level 2B, Unit 2

Now let’s review what you will do…

  • Now let’s review what you will do…
  • Language Functions
  • What will you do?
  • Ask and answer questions
  • Vocabulary
  • You will use the words…
  • Quilt
  • Husband
  • Huppa
  • Tablecloth
  • Tradition
  • bouquet
  • Patterns & Structures
  • Write questions
  • This information comes
  • from the LAA form.
  • LAA Pie Chart

Questions

  • When you want information, you ask a question.
  • Use question words to ask a question.
  • End your question with a question mark.

Question Words

  • Can
  • How
  • Where
  • Do, Does, Did
  • What
  • Who
  • Am, Is, Are
  • When
  • Why

Examples

  • Whose clothes were used to make the quilt?
  • The family clothes were used to make the quilt.
  • What were some of the things in Mary Ellen’ s bouquet? Some of the things in Mary Ellen’s bouquet were gold, bread, and salt.
  • What did Anna give Carl when she was born?
  • Anna gave Carl a gift of gold, flower, salt, and bread.

Let’s Review the Vocabulary

  • Let’s Review the Vocabulary

Quilt

  • Bed cover made of pieces of cloth sewn together

Husband

  • Man who is married

huppa

  • Cloth supported on poles that a couple stands under when being married

Tablecloth

  • Cloth for covering a table, used especially at meals

bouquet

  • Bunch of flowers

tradition

  • Way of acting that is passed from generation to generation

It’s your turn!!!

  • It’s your turn!!!

Directions: Work in Pairs

  • Look at the pictures on pages 79-83 and choose the one you like the most
  • Talk about what you see.
  • Write 3 questions you might have about the picture you have chosen.
  • Make sure to use:
      • correct word order
      • proper intonation
      • questions words-
      • Who, What, Where, When, Why, Whose, How, Which , etc.
  • Be ready to present as a pair.

Now Let’s Sample your LAA Performance…

  • Now Let’s Sample your LAA Performance…
  • Congratulations!

A Close and Assess Activity for an Exit Ticket

  • Sum It Up
  • Thanks for your attention!
  • Please fill out an evaluation.

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