English 53 (English 60 and English 50) Reading, Reasoning, and Writing



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sources


All Africa.com

globalissues.org minneafrica.worldpress.com

globalization101.org tigweb.org

nato.int www.safemotherhood.org

web.worldbank.org www.unaids.org

unifem.org worldwatch.org www.measuredhs.com Worldatlas.com/web image/countrys/Africa www.cedpa.org



grade sheet for research project

Criteria

Keep It up!

Met expectations



Opportunities

Inconsistently met expectations



Want to talk?

Did not meet expectations



Research

Used EBSCOhost to find an article or used a source provided by instructor or found a reliable source on own through Google Scholar or other scholarly source

All sources are included



Mix of scholarly and unscholarly sources

Not all sources are included



used unscholarly sources, like Wikipedia or ask.com

Did not include article sources



Content

Thoroughly discussed what country and the issue. Included an opinion on the issue. Used two sources.

1 1/2 to 2 pages



Included some information. Not complete, some missing information

Much of the information is missing

Too short



Grammar

Few to no grammar errors in punctuation, run-ons, fragments, verb errors, etc.

Easy to read



Some errors in punctuation, run-ons, fragments, verbs,

Many errors, hard to read













grade sheet on oral report

Oral report


Keep it up!
Used visuals,
organized,
answered questions,
smooth delivery,
both members participate

5 minutes



Opportunities
Visuals could be more effective
Some questions were addressed or answered

Didn't meet expectations.
No visuals,

unorganized, only one member participates,


Couldn't answer questions,
Too long or too short
Delivery is not smooth



OCE on CS and RE

The three books we have discussed this semester: Cognitive Surplus by Clay Shirky, Monique and the Mango Rains by Kris Holloway, and Replenishing the Earth by Wangari Maathai all relate to change. Take CS and RE and discuss values related to change. I want you to make connections between the two books and arrive at conclusions about change and values. In addition, what comparisons and contrasts can you make between the two authors?

3-4 pages typed with a works cited page. Choose one of the following:

1. How do Maathai's values on empowerment and service # 3 and #4 relate to Shirky's points in chapter 6 on civic engagement?

2. How does Maathai's value #1 on the planet and trees relate to Shirky's points in chapter 5 on shared culture and relationships?

3. How does Maathai's value #2 on gratitude and respect relate to Shirky's point in chapter 3 on people and their motivations?

4. How does Maathai's view of how things are in chapter 10 compare with Shirky's in his last chapter?

Peer edit for outline on RE and CS

writer's name ________________________ reader's name _________________

1. Is the thesis/opinion stated in one clear sentence that answers the question on change and values and makes connections between the two books?

2. What suggestions do you have on the thesis?

3. How appropriate are the topic sentences for each paragraph? How well do they support the thesis and make connections?

4. What suggestions do you have on the topic sentences?

5. How appropriate are the examples/evidence under each topic sentence?

6. What suggestions do you have on the evidence/examples?

7. What do you like best about this outline?

Peer edit for outline on RE and CS

writer's name ________________________ reader's name _________________

1. Is the thesis/opinion stated in one clear sentence that answers the question on change and values and makes connections between the two books?

2. What suggestions do you have on the thesis?

3. How appropriate are the topic sentences for each paragraph? How well do they support the thesis and make connections?

4. What suggestions do you have on the topic sentences?

5. How appropriate are the examples/evidence under each topic sentence?

6. What suggestions do you have on the evidence/examples?

7. What do you like best about this outline?
peer edit of first draft of OCE on RE and CS (3 - 4 pages)

writer's name _____________________ reader's name___________

1. Is the thesis/opinion about change and values stated in one clear sentence in the first paragraph? Restate the thesis in your own words.

2. How completely does the writer explain connections between the two texts? What more information would help you to better understand the connections?

3. How critically does the writer analyze the readings? What more would you like to see?

4. How completely does the writer include his or her opinion?

5. How well does the conclusion sum up the essay?

7. What suggestions do you have to improve this paper?

8. What do you like best about this paper?
peer edit of first draft of OCE on RE and CS (3 - 4 pages)

writer's name _____________________ reader's name___________

1. Is the thesis/opinion about change and values stated in one clear sentence in the first paragraph? Restate the thesis in your own words.

2. How completely does the writer explain connections between the two texts? What more information would help you to better understand the connections?

3. How critically does the writer analyze the readings? What more would you like to see?

4. How completely does the writer include his or her opinion?

5. How well does the conclusion sum up the essay?

7. What suggestions do you have to improve this paper?

8. What do you like best about this paper?

Conference sheet on SECOND DRAFT on OCE on CS and RE

1. What comments did you receive on your first draft?


2. What changes did you make?

3. What specific questions do you have on your second draft? (introduction, how to develop your ideas, quoting, punctuation, fragments, run-ons, etc)




Criteria for OCE on RE and CS

Keep it up!

(Met expectations)



Opportunities (Inconsistently met expectations)

Want to talk?

(Didn't meet expectations)



Content

(40%)

Responds to assigned topic.

Is insightful and interesting.

Shows critical thinking. Has a strong, logical argument. Includes appropriate details, examples, details, and evidence from both books and makes connections.

Evidence is cited correctly.



Responds to the assigned topic.

Has an argument.

Argument could include more critical thinking or analysis.

The argument could include more details, examples, connections, or evidence.

Evidence could connect to point better or cite more correctly.


Does not respond to assigned topic.

No argument.

No details or evidence. Examples may not fit the topic. Repetitive or confusing content.


Organization

(30%)


Thesis is in the first paragraph. Introduction has appropriate background and hooks the reader. Each paragraph has one idea.

Evidence is in the middle.

Transition words connect ideas.

Conclusion wraps up the topic and predicts or expands.



Thesis is in the first paragraph.

Intro could have more background.

Thesis could be stronger.

Topic sentence(s) could be stronger reasons or connect to thesis.

Body paragraphs could be on different points, include more examples, evidence, or development.


No thesis or thesis is not in the introduction.

No transition words.

No conclusion.

Paragraphing is not clear.



Hard to follow.

Grammar

(30%)

virtually free of sentence errors: awk sentences, punctuation errors or sp errors. Has sentence variety and appropriate vocabulary.

Noticeable errors in awk sentences, punct, sp, frag, run-ons, verbs, vocab, pronouns, sentence variety.

Many distracting errors in awk sentences, punctuation, sp, frags, run-ons, or verbs.




Preposition usage list

accuse someone of (be) good at think about

(be) accustomed to (be) grateful to someone for

adjust to (be) guilty of (be) tired of

(be) afraid of (be) happy about

agree with hear about (be) upset about

(be) amazed at/by hear of (be) upset with

(be) angry about hope for (be) used to

(be) angry at/with (be) incapable of wait for

apologize for insist on/upon (be) worried about

approve of (be) interested in worry about

argue about (be) involved in

argue with (be) jealous of

(be) ashamed of (be) known for

(be) aware of (be) lazy about

believe in listen to

blame someone for look at

(be) bored with/ by look for

(be) capable of look forward to

care about/ for (be) mad about

compare to/with (be) mad at

complain about (be) made from/of

(be) concerned about (be) married to

concentrate on object to

consist of (be) opposed to

count on participate in

deal with plan on

decide on pray to

depend on/upon pray for

(be) different from (be) prepared for

disapprove of prevent someone from

(be) divorced from protect someone from

(be) engaged to (be) proud of

(be) excited about recover from

(be) familiar with (be) related to

(be) famous for rely on/upon

feel like (be) responsible for

(be) fond of (be) sad about

forget about (be) satisfied with

forgive someone for (be) scared of

(be) glad about (be) sick of

(be) sorry about/for speak about

speak to/with succeed in

(be) sure of/about (be) surprised at

take care of talk about

talk to/with thank someone for





Word Parts and Prefix List
Word part means examples

A, an not, without amoral, atypical

Arch chief architect

Am, amat love amateur, amiable

Ante before anteroom, antecedent

Anti opposite, against antipathy, antibody

Aqu water aquarium, aqueduct

Aud, audit hear audible, auditorium

Auto self autograph, autobiography

Bene good benefit, benediction

Bi teo bicycle, bifocal

Bio life biology, biopsy

Chron time chronic, chronology

Circum around circumscribe, circumference

Co together coagulate, coeducational

Crypt secret cryptic, cryptonym

De from, down deport, descend

Dem people democracy, epidemic

Derm skin dermatologist, pachyderm

Dic, dict say contradict, dictate

Dis opposite of disagree, disappear

Dyn power dynamic, dynamite

Eu good, well euphoria, eulogy

Fac make, do factor, factory

Hyper excessive hyper

Im, in not incorrect, immovable

In in inland, inhaling

Inter between intercultural

Log word, study monologue, embryology

Luc light translucent, lucid

Mal bad malice, malodorous

Man hand manufacture, demand

Mis wrong misquote

Mot, mov move motive, commotion

Mor, mort death mortician, mortal

Neur nerve neurologist, neuron

Non not nonsense

Orth right, true orthodontists, orthodox

Pan all panacea, panhellenic

Path feelings empathy

Ped foot pedestrian, centipede

Pend spend, think, hang pending, expend

Phil loving bibliophile, philanthropist

Psych mind, spirit psychic, psychotherapy

Port, portal carry portable, transport

Post after postgraduate

Pre before prehistoric

Pro to move ahead,for promotion, propose

Re again recycle

Scrib, script write conscription, prescribe

Soph wisdom philosophy, sophomore

Sol alone isolate, solitaire

Spec, spect look introspection, circumspect

Sub under subtitle, submarine

Super more than supermarket

Tele far telephone

Terra earth territory, terra cotta

Therm heat thermostat, hydrothermal

Trans across transversal, transport

Tri three trio, tricycle

Un not unquestionable

Uni one unicorn

Urb city urban, suburb

Ver true verify



Voc, vocat call revoke, vocation



Sentence types
Simple – one independent clause


Compound – two or more independent clauses
Complex – one independent clause and one or more dependent (subordinate) clauses

Compound complex – two or more independent clauses and one or more dependent (subordinate) clauses

Coordinating Conjunctions (cc)

(FANBOYS)

for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so



CA- conjunctive adverb

I – independent clause

D – dependent clause

SC- subordinating conjunction
Common subordinating conjunctions (SC)

used in complex sentences
Cause or effect Condition

as even if

because if

in order that if only

since provided

so that since

unless

Concession when

although whenever

as if whether

even if how

even though

though
Comparison or contrast Purpose

as

as if so that



as though that

___________________________

than Relative connectors

whereas (pronouns, adj., adv.)

whether which

while that

whatever

Space or time whose

after since whichever

as long as whom

before when what

now that who

once where whomever

whenever whoever

wherever why

until while where

** Subordinating conjunctions and relative connectors start subordinate (dependent) clauses in complex sentences

Common conjunctive adverbs (CA) and transitional phrases

Used in compound sentences
Addition Comparison or contrast

also however

besides in comparison

further in contrast

furthermore instead conversely

in addition likewise on the other hand

incidentally nevertheless

moreover otherwise

similarly

nonetheless



Emphasis

certainly

indeed Cause or effect

in fact accordingly

still as a result

undoubtedly consequently

specifically hence

therefore



Time thus

finally


meanwhile

next


now Misc.

then for example

thereafter for instance

subsequently after all

even so

anyway


incidentally


** Conjunctive adverbs connect equal clauses (in compound sentences).

I: ca, i

Common prepositions
about into

above like

according near

according to of

across off

after on


against onto

along out

along with outside

among over

around past

as regarding

at round

because of since

before through

behind throughout

below to

beneath toward

beside under

between underneath

beyond unlike

by until


concerning up

despite upon

down up to

during till

except with

except for within

excepting without

for next to

from

in

in addition to



inside

in spite of

instead of *** start prep. phrases, which add details

Transition words

addition additionally, also, too, as well as, besides, equally important, furthermore, in addition, moreover

result or cause consequently, hence, therefore, so, thus, because, then, as a result, accordingly, as a consequence, for this reason
contrast or at the same time, but, despite this/that, instead,

opposing view however, on the contrary, in contrast, nevertheless, nonetheless, besides, otherwise

example for example, as a case in point, in particular, namely, specifically, generally

summary evidently, actually, overall, briefly, on the whole, in short

emphasize above all, certainly, especially, in fact, indeed,

an idea surely, most importantly, naturally, equally important

concede a granted, certainly, no doubt, although this may be

point true

qualify perhaps, probably, for the most part, in part,

a point apparently, seemingly

***use these to connect ideas within or between sentences.


Parts of speech
Noun - names a person, place, thing, idea, feeling.
Pronoun - takes the place of a noun.

Personal (I, you, he, she, etc.); reflexive (myself, himself, etc.); relative (that, which, that, whose, etc.); demonstrative (this, that, these, those); indefinite (everybody, few, each); possessive (his, hers, mine) and interrogative (who, what, etc.).


Verb - shows action or helps make a statement

Action - shows action

Linking - links a subject to a describing word. These can be linking verbs : to be, to feel, to remain, to grow, etc.

Helping - helps an action or linking verb. Examples are do, does, did, has, had, have, may, might, must, should, would, could, shall, will, can, is, am, are, was, were, be, being, been.


Adjective - modifies a noun, tells which one, how many, what kind.
Adverb - modifies adjectives and other adverbs, tells how, when, where, and to what extent.
Preposition - shows a relationship between a noun or pronoun and some other word in the sentence. List is on previous page.
Conjunction - joins words, phrases, and clauses.

Coordinating conjunction - for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so

Subordinating conjunction - start dependent clauses (since, when, after, if, etc.)

Correlative - (not only/but also, neither/nor, either/or, both/and)


Infinitive - to + a verb
Articles - a, an, the (are also adjectives)


Sentence parts

Subject -

a noun, pronoun, gerund, or infinitive

is never in the prepositional phrase

is never here or there

can be understood or implied

part of the sentence about which something is being said



Verb - see previous page


Clauses

Independent clauses - can stand on their own.

Dependent clauses -

can not stand on their own

start with a subordinating conjunction (listed on a previous page)

have a subject and a verb

need an independent clause

are needed to create complex sentences



Example: When I get up


Comma rules
1. Put commas around nonessential information, such as adjective clauses and appositives.

Example: My brother, who drives a red truck, works in the film industry.

I like to eat at Olive Garden, an Italian restaurant.
2. Put commas around interrupters.

Example: The information, however, is subject to discussion.


3. Put a comma after a dependent clause.

Example: After the cats ate, they went to sleep.


4. Put a comma after a coordinating conjunction in a compound sentence.

Example: Jackson sleeps on the sofa, but Jayme likes to sleep in a hidden place.


5. Put a comma between items in a series of three or more.

Example: Jayme meowed, ate his food, and ran around the house.


6. Put a comma after introductory word groups and direct address.

Example: Luckily, I found the source of the leak.


7. Put a comma between a city and state.

Example: Her house in Bakersfield, California, is air-conditioned.





Semi-colon rules
1. Put a semi-colon between independent clauses.

Example: Jayme is Jack’s brother; they play well together.


2. Put a semi-colon before a conjunctive adverb in a compound sentence.

Example: Jack is blind; consequently, he runs into the furniture if he gets scared.

3. Put a semi-colon between items in a series that has commas.

Example: I have invited my sister, who lives in Tennessee; my aunt, who lives in Maryland; and my friend, who lives in Los Angeles.




Colon rules
1. Put a colon after an independent clause and before a list or explanation.

Example: The career has three qualifications: outgoing personality, good with statistics, and impressive research skills.

2. Put a colon after an independent clause and before a quote.

Example: He explained the colon rule clearly: “When a colon is used to introduce a quotation, the part of the sentence that precedes the colon should be grammatically independent.”





mechanics

Underlining or italics

Underline the complete work: newspaper, magazine, Cds, movie, novel, play



Quotes

Put quotes around the part: article, song, poem, short story, TV episode




Apostrophe

used to make words possessive and in contractions

never used on verbs

never used on possessive pronouns (his, hers, ours, theirs, etc.)

if the word is plural and ends in s, just add an apostrophe

Capitalization

Capitalize the first word in a sentence



Capitalize proper nouns




Citing Sources and documentation
Signal Phrases

  • Used to introduce a summary, paraphrase, or quote.

  • Puts quote in context.


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