Engl 1020 (Section #) Freshman Composition II semester/Year



Download 33.25 Kb.
Date08.06.2018
Size33.25 Kb.
#50074


The mission of Motlow State Community College is to enrich

and empower its students and the community it serves.

ENGL 1020 (Section #) Freshman Composition II Semester/Year


This Course Outline is subject to change with notice.

Credit Hours:


3

Prerequisites:


ENGL 1010

Catalog Description:


This course emphasizes expository and analytic writing, critical thinking, in-depth extended research, and the incorporation and documentation of source material into student writing.

Group for Whom the Class is Intended:


This course is intended for students pursuing any of the following degrees and programs of study:

Associates of Arts/Science, Tennessee Transfer Pathways

Associate of Arts/Science, University Parallel.

Instructor Information:


Title and name

Office:

Office Hours:

Office Phone Number:

Email:

Required Texts:


Kirszner/Mandell, Practical Argument: A Text and Anthology, 3rd Ed. (ISBN: 978-1-

319-06375-7)



Hacker, Rules for Writers, 8th ed. (Motlow edition ISBN: 9781319148799)

Supplemental Materials:


Flash Drive, Microsoft Word or compatible program

Program Learning Outcomes:


After completing the requirements of the English Program, students will be able to . . .

  • Express themselves in writing that demonstrates mastery of the conventions of professional writing including correctness of usage, punctuation, mechanics, and syntax.

  • Express themselves in writing that demonstrates attention to rhetorical situation and that achieves intended and specific purposes.

  • Gather information from a variety of media sources, evaluate that information in terms of credibility and authority, and incorporate it into writing that demonstrates independent and critical thinking.

  • Analyze and evaluate arguments, beliefs, and issues throughout human history in such a way as to become more informed regarding the students’ contemporary world.

  • Analyze literary texts as both works of art and products of cultural exchange.

Student Learning Outcomes:


By the end of the course, students will be able to . . .

  • Distill a primary purpose into a single, compelling statement.

  • Order and develop major points in a reasonable and convincing manner based on the writer’s purpose and the needs of the academic audience.

Employ correct diction, syntax, usage, grammar, and mechanics in their writing.

  • Understand that the writing process includes procedures such as planning, organizing, composing, revising, and editing.

  • Locate, evaluate, manage, and incorporate basic information gathered from multiple sources into academic essays.

  • Write thesis-driven arguments that take clear positions on contemporary topics of debate.

  • Craft effective arguments by conceding minor points and by refuting the opposition.


Course Objectives:

  • To practice writing as a process involving Invention, Drafting, Revising, and Editing.

  • To practice arguing a thesis persuasively for a narrow audience.

  • To practice an awareness of the rhetorical situation by writing with a focused purpose to a narrow audience.

  • To practice utilizing appropriate rhetorical patterns and functions.

  • To practice editing and revising strategies for errors in syntax, usage, grammar, and mechanics.

  • To practice correctly quoting, paraphrasing, and summarizing source material in MLA format.

  • To practice reading comprehension and rhetorical analysis skills.

  • To practice critical thinking skills.

  • To practice finding and managing appropriate sources for writing assignments.

  • To practice evaluating the credibility and effectiveness of sources.

Major Assignments and Method for Calculating the Final Grade:


% of Final Grade Assignment

20% 4-6 page Rhetorical Analysis Essay

25% 4-6 page 1st Arguing a Position Essay

35% 5-10 page 2nd Arguing a Position Essay

20% Daily Grades

Grading Policies:

Grading Scale:


A 100-90

B 89-80


C 79-70

D 69-60


F below 60

Daily Grades Policy:


There will be a number of daily assignments including reading quizzes on the reading assignments from the textbooks, peer review activities, homework, etc. that will be worth 10 points each. At the end of the semester, I will drop your two lowest grades. For this reason, daily grades cannot be made up, and missed assignments will receive a grade of zero.

Attendance Policy:


After a student’s 2nd unexcused absence, the student’s final grade will be reduced by 5% for each additional unexcused absence. Medical absences will require a note from a medical professional. Students may be given an institutional excuse for absence on the basis that the student represents the college at a public event in the interest of the college or is engaged in an activity such as a field trip, which contributes to the education of the student. In granting an institutional excuse for absence, the college does not excuse the student from the responsibility for material covered or assigned during the absence.

Late Work Policy:


Essays not turned in on the due date will be penalized 10% for each class period between the due date and the submission of the late work.

Essay Revision Policy:


Students will be allowed to and are encouraged to revise their essays for better grades. After receiving a grade on an essay, students may conference with me about how to improve the writing and thus the essay grade. The revised essay grade will take the place of the original essay grade. These revisions will be due in the Final Folder. Students should note, however, that revision does not guarantee a better grade, though it is highly unlikely that a revised essay will receive a lower grade than the original.

Course Policies:

Submitting Essays:


Final draft of the course Essay must be typed via a Microsoft Word compatible program. The essay must be submitted to me via the Dropbox for our class in D2L no later than the day and time stated on the course Daily Schedule below. Any essay not submitted via D2L will be considered late even if the student submits a hardcopy of the assigned essay in class on the due date.

Academic Misconduct Policy:


Plagiarism, cheating, and other forms of academic dishonesty are prohibited. Students guilty of academic misconduct, either directly or indirectly, through participation or assistance, are immediately responsible to the instructor of the class. Based on their professional judgment, instructors have the authority to impose the following academic sanctions: (a) require the student to repeat the assignment for full or partial credit; (b) assign a zero, an F, or any other grade appropriate for the assignment or examination; (c) assign an F for the course. In addition, disciplinary sanctions may be imposed through the regular institutional procedures. For more information, see MSCC Policy 3:02:00:03.

Classroom Misconduct Policy:


The instructor has the primary responsibility for maintenance of academic integrity and

controlling classroom behavior, and can order temporary removal or exclusion from the classroom of any student engaged in disruptive conduct or conduct that violates the general rules and regulations of the institution for each class session during which the conduct occurs. Extended or permanent exclusion from the classroom, beyond the session in which the conduct occurred, or further disciplinary action can be effected only through appropriate procedures of the institution.


Disruptive behavior in the classroom may be defined as, but not limited to, behavior that obstructs or disrupts the learning environment (e.g., offensive language, harassment of students and professors, repeated outbursts from a student which disrupt the flow of instruction or prevent concentration on the subject taught, failure to cooperate in maintaining classroom decorum, etc.), text messaging, and the continued use of any electronic or other noise or light emitting device which disturbs others (e.g., disturbing noises from beepers, cell phones, palm pilots, lap-top computers, games, etc.). For more information, see MSCC Policy 3:02:00:03.

Class Cancellation Policy:


If class is cancelled for any reason, you will be notified via our D2L page and will be told there how to prepare for the next class period.

Emergency Procedures Policy:


In case of a medical emergency we will immediately dial 9-911 and report the nature of the medical emergency to emergency response personnel. We will try to stay with the person(s) in need and maintain a calm atmosphere. We will talk to the person as much as possible until response personnel arrive on campus, and we will have someone go outside to meet emergency personnel and direct them to the appropriate location.
In the event of an emergency (drill or actual), a signal will be sent. Based on that signal, students will follow the procedures below for that specific type of emergency:
Loud warbling sound throughout Building (FIRE)

Collect purses and coats and proceed immediately out of your room and exit through the closest emergency exit. Proceed to the Designated Assembly Area closing windows and doors as you exit. Remain there until the "All Clear" Signal is given by an Emergency Management Team member. (Instructors- Provide your Designated Assembly Area, and its location to students)


Tornado Siren (SEVERE WEATHER):

Proceed to the closest designated severe weather shelter on the 1st floor and proceed all the way into the shelter. Crouch down on the floor with your head between your knees facing away from the outside walls. Remain there until the "All Clear" Signal is given. (Instructors- Provide the recommended room number or hallway location to students)


Air Horn (1 Long Blast) and Face to Face All Clear (INTRUDER/HOSTAGE):

Ensure door is closed, locked and lights turned off. If your door will not lock, move some tables and chairs in front of the door quickly. Move immediately to the rear of the room away from the door and sit on the floor- out of sight if possible. Remain calm and quiet and do not respond to any inquiries at the door unless you have been given the "All Clear" and a member of law enforcement or your campus Emergency Management Team member makes face-to-face contact at your door.


Classroom Locked-door Policy:


In order to adhere to MSCC Emergency Preparedness Policy and to facilitate effective classroom management, the classroom door will remain closed and locked for the duration of the class period.

Food and Drink Policy:


No food or drink will be allowed in class.

Retention of Graded Essays Policy:


Per MSCC English Department Policy, students must submit a final folder at the scheduled time of the Final Exam for the course containing the original graded copies of all graded work in the course excluding work that comprised the Daily Grade. This folder should have pockets to hold the material securely and should be clearly labeled with the student’s name as well as the year, semester, section number, and name of the course. Students who do not submit this folder may receive an Incomplete for the course grade until the folder is submitted. *Students who submit essays to D2L dropbox folders may use these submissions in place of a physical, graded essays folder.

Educational Technology:

Accessing Campus Computers or the MSCC Library from off Campus:


Your Username format is your First Initial, Last Name and Month and Day Birthday in the Format of MMDD. Example: Marcia Smith born on April 11, 1992 - Username: msmith0411. Your Pin will be the numeric pin you created when you initially applied to Motlow College.

Using D2L:


For help with D2L including how to submit materials to a Dropbox, see this page:

Link to MSCC TechTube

Technical Support/Assistance:


Students having problems logging into a course, timing out of a course, using course web site tools, or any other technical problems, should contact the MSCC Technology Help Desk at 931-393-1510 or toll free 1-800-654-4877, Ext. #1510 (or d2lhelp@mscc.edu)

Disability Services/Accommodations:


Motlow College is committed to meeting the needs of qualified students with disabilities by providing equal access to educational opportunities, programs, and activities in the most integrated setting appropriate. This commitment is consistent with the College's obligations under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA). Together, these laws prohibit discrimination against qualified persons with disabilities. To this end, the Director of Disability Services for Motlow College coordinates services and serves as an advocate and liaison for students with disabilities attending Motlow College. Contact the Director of Disability Services here: Link to MSCC's Disability Services.
Students with disabilities who would need assistance in an emergency evacuation should self-disclose that need to the instructor no later than the second day of class or second group meeting.

Confidentiality of Student Records (FERPA Policy):


The education records of current and former students at Motlow State Community College are maintained as confidential records pursuant to The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974 as amended. For further information, see MSCC Policy No. 3:02:03:00.

Student Success:


MSCC Instructors can guide students to specific resources regarding Advisement and Tutoring in their discipline. For additional help, see the Student Success and Advisement pages of the MSCC Homepage.:

Link to MSCC's Student Success Webpage

Link to MSCC's Advisement Webpage
ENGL students can get writing assistance and tutorials (by appointment) via the Honors Tutoring program on any campus. Students should contact the Assistant Director of Student Services on their campus for tutoring schedule information: Link to MSCC's Student Services

Writing Center Tutoring:


You’ll be able to work with me, your instructor, and a Writing Center tutor that is embedded in our D2L course shell. You can also schedule a tutoring session and take any writing assignment for any class to the Writing Center on your campus for extra help!
The Writing Center offers one-on-one sessions with knowledgeable, attentive tutors. They can assist you with any writing project at any stage in the writing process. While they are happy to help you improve any individual assignment, the ultimate goal is to help you become a more confident, competent college writer! Writing Center locations on each campus can be located on the Writing Center’s website, Link to MSCC's Writing Center, or you can make an appointment by going to mscc.mywconline.com.

Class Schedule of Assignments:


All page numbers refer to Practical Argument unless noted otherwise.

(RW=Rules for Writers)

Copies of the books are in the library for students to reference until they have purchased their book. Students will not be excused from quizzes or class work due to not having purchased a book.


Module 1: Rhetorical Analysis

WEEK ONE


Class 1 Instructions for D2L.

Course Introduction and Discussion of Course Policies.

Lecture/Discussion on “An Introduction to Argument” 3-21.
Class 2 “Understanding Argument” 23-27

In groups, construct an argument answering the following: “Should Literature be

a core requirement for most degrees at Motlow?” Use the Checklist on 27 as a guide.

WEEK TWO


Class 1 Homework due: Read 28-56. Complete the “At Issue” exercise on 42 and

Exercise 1 on 55. “Template for Structuring an Argument”


Class 2 In class, discuss 28-56. Groups will work together to complete Exercises 1.4 and

1.5 (55-56).


WEEK THREE


Class 1 Homework due: Read 59-81. Complete “Template for Writing a Critical

Response” on 80. Discuss 59-81. Read RW: pg. 66-78.


Class 2 Homework due: Read 83-113.

Discussion of Rhetorical Analysis.

Assign the Rhetorical Analysis Essay:

Write a 4-6 page Rhetorical Analysis of Betty Friedan’s “The Importance of Work” on pages 790-793.


WEEK FOUR


Class 1 Homework due: Read Betty Friedan’s “The Importance of Work” on pages 790-793. In class, we will complete the Checklist on 113.
Class 2 Homework due: Read 113-117. Write a one-page Rhetorical Analysis that fills in

the blanks of the template on 113. This is not an essay, so you should concentrate on your analysis here and less on supporting that analysis as if you were writing a fully-developed essay.

In class, we will complete Exercise 4.1 together.

WEEK FIVE


Class 1 Homework due:

Read “Summarizing, Paraphrasing, Quoting, and Synthesizing” 329-343 and “Documenting Sources: MLA” 345-347. Complete Exercises 9.1 (331), 9.2 (334), and 9.3 (334).

In class, we will complete Exercises 9.4 and 9.5 (336) together.
Class 2 Read RW: pg. 431-455.

Drafting in class. (Bring all your work thus far to class where you may continue to work on your draft and conference with me as needed).


WEEK SIX


Class 1 Review RW: pg. 458-512.

Drafting in class. (Bring all your work thus far to class where you may continue to work on your draft and conference with me as needed).


Class 2 Rhetorical Analysis Essay due by the end of class. Submit a hardcopy to me

and place an electronic copy in the appropriate D2L Dropbox.



Module 2: Arguing a Position

WEEK SEVEN


Class 1 Homework due: Read “Planning Drafting, and Revising and Argumentative

Essay” (253-284).

Discuss Chapter 7 in class.

Assign the 1st Arguing a Position Essay: Write an essay that answers the question

of whether the benefits of bottled water outweigh the costs. Use both essays for our texts on this topic from Chapter 20 in your essay as well as at least two other sources you locate, evaluate, and reference on your own. See 271-271 for advice about how to structure your argumentative essay and 280-284 for a sample of this structure. Make sure your essay has a clear audience.
Class 2 Homework due: Read “Finding and Evaluating Sources” (287-327).

In class, we will complete Exercises 8.1 (296), 8.2 (301), 8.3 (307) together. Review RW: pg. 396-408.



WEEK EIGHT


Class 1 Homework due: Read Erin Blaine’s essay, “Should Data Posted on Social-

Networking Sites Be ‘Fair Game’ for Employers” (361-367). Then, answer the questions listed under the two Checklists on 274 as if they pertained to Blaine’s essay rather than one you wrote yourself. Be a Peer Reviewer for Blaine using the Checklists as a guide.

In class, discuss Chapter 10 (“Documenting Sources: MLA”). Review RW: pg. 416-425.
Class 2 Homework due: Read “Using Sources Responsibly” (369-385). Complete Exercise 11.2 (375) and 11.3 (379).

In class, we will complete the At Issue exercise on 385.


WEEK NINE


Class 1 Drafting in class. (Bring all your work thus far to class where you may continue to

work on your draft and conference with me as needed).


Class 2 Drafting in class. (Bring all your work thus far to class where you may continue to

work on your draft and conference with me as needed).


WEEK TEN


Class 1 Peer Review. Bring two complete copies of your completed Arguing a Position Essay to class (one copy for me; one copy for the Peer Review). To complete the Peer Review, we will use the two Checklists on 274.

Class 2 1st Arguing a Position Essay due by the end of class. Submit a hardcopy to me

and place an electronic copy in the appropriate D2L Dropbox.

Module 3


(The General Education Assessment Essay)

All ENGL 1020 students will write an essay using multiple sources that answers the question, “Should vaccinations be required for all children?”


WEEK ELEVEN


Class 1 Homework due: Read “Should Vaccination Be Required for all Children” essays (482-515).

Assign the 2nd Arguing a Position Essay:

Write an essay that answers the question of whether vaccination should be required for all children. You may not use any of the essays in Practical Argument as your sources. Instead, locate, evaluate, and incorporate into your essay at least four sources to support your stance. See 513-515 for advice about how to structure your argumentative essay and 280-284 for a sample of argumentative essay structure. The audience for this essay will be parents. The goal will be to get those parents to write to their state and local governments in support of the writer’s position.

Assign the Annotated Bibliography.


Class 2 Homework due: Students will work independently on locating and evaluating sources for the 2nd Arguing a Position Essay.

WEEK TWELVE


Class 1 Homework due: Completed Annotated Bibliography due by the end of class.

Submit a hardcopy to me and place an electronic copy in the appropriate D2L Dropbox.


Class 2 Drafting in class. (Bring all your work thus far to class where you may continue to

work on your draft and conference with me as needed).


WEEK THIRTEEN

Class 1 Drafting in class. (Bring all your work thus far to class where you may continue to

work on your draft and conference with me as needed).
Class 2 Drafting in class. (Bring all your work thus far to class where you may continue to

work on your draft and conference with me as needed).


WEEK FOURTEEN


CLASS 1 Drafting in class. (Bring all your work thus far to class where you may continue

to work on your draft and conference with me as needed).


CLASS 2 Peer Review. Bring two complete copies of your completed Arguing a Position Essay to class (one copy for me; one copy for the Peer Review). To complete the Peer Review, we will use the two Checklists on 274.

FINALS WEEK


Folders due at the assigned time for our Final Exam (see the Fall Final Exam

Schedule on the Calendars link at MSCC Homepage).


Students should remember to submit a hardcopy of the 2nd Arguing a Position Essay to me in their folders and place an electronic copy in the appropriate D2L Dropbox.
Unless otherwise instructed, final folders should have pockets to hold the material securely and should be clearly labeled with the student’s name as well as the year, semester, section number, and name of the course. Folders must contain the graded drafts of the first two essays, revisions of these first two essays (if the student has chosen to revise), and the final draft of the 2nd Arguing a Position Essay. Homework and quizzes should not be included in the Final Folder. Students who do not submit this folder may receive an Incomplete for the course grade until the folder is submitted.
Directory: documents -> syllabi -> 1718 -> languages
syllabi -> Course Syllabus Military Science and Leadership (msl) 102 Introduction to Leadership Spring Semester, 2013
syllabi -> Rels 264: Death, Dying and the Afterlife Spring 2014
syllabi -> Office Phone: (801) 422-3657 Office Location
syllabi -> Political Science 150: Introduction to American Government and Politics
syllabi -> University of North Carolina at Greensboro Bryan School of Business and Economics Department of Accounting and Finance
syllabi -> Instructor cpt kris Pyette
syllabi -> Political Science 401 Political Controversy & Political Skills
syllabi -> Office: tlc 3138 Office Hours: mw 12: 30-1: 50, t 10: 00-1: 50, r 10: 00-10: 50 and 1: 00-1: 50 Writing Center Hours
syllabi -> Office: tlc 3138 Office Hours: mw 12: 30-1: 50, t 10: 00-1: 50, r 10: 00-10: 50 and 1: 00-1: 50 Writing Center Hours
languages -> Engl 1010 (Section #) Freshman Composition I semester/Year

Download 33.25 Kb.

Share with your friends:




The database is protected by copyright ©sckool.org 2023
send message

    Main page