Early Childhood Education Pn. 7939 00



Download 0.55 Mb.
Page10/10
Date19.02.2017
Size0.55 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10

24 David Duffy, John Fitzgerald, Ide Kearney, Fergal Shortall, Medium-Term Review: 1997-2003, ESRI, April 1997 p. 64.

25 OECD Economic Surveys: Ireland, Paris, 1995, p. 58.

26 Karoly, L., Greenwood, P., et al., 1998. The programmes compared are the Perry Preschool programme and the Elmira Prenatal/Early Infancy Project (PEIP).

27 Crime: arrests and convictions through age 15 in Elmira PEIP, arrests through age 27 in Perry. Health: hospital visits/days (Elmira PEIP), teen pregnancies (Perry). Welfare: receipt of various forms of public assistance.

28 Ibid., pp. 74/5.

29 Ibid., p. 74.

30 National Forum Report, p. 118.

31 Forthcoming Education Policy Analysis, OECD, 1999.

32 Educational Research Centre, Dublin, Early Start Preschool Programme, Final Evaluation Report.

33 Bloom, B.S., Stability and Change in Human Characteristics, New York, Wiley, 1964, cited in (among others) Early Childhood Education: Issues & Concerns, INTO, Dublin, November 1995, p. xii.

34 Purves, D., Neural Activity and the Growth of the Brain, New York, Cambridge University Press, 1994.

35 “Grey Matters” Current Neurological Research and its Implications for Educators, Sir David Winkly, at Keele University, June, 1999.

36 Ibid., 1999.

37 Karoly, L., Greenwood, P., et al, 1998, p. 3.

38 Winkly, D., 1999.

39 National Forum Report, p. 9.

40 A Review of Services for Young Children in the European Union 1990-1995, European Commission Network on Childcare, January 1996, p. 125.

1 Statistical Report 1997/98, tables 1.4 and 2.1. According to the Statistical Report, the participation rate at age 5 is 100%. However, these rates are based on provisional inter-censal estimates of population by single year of age and must be interpreted with caution.

2 Average of rates from 1993/4 to 1997/8: girls 54.9%, boys 50.2%.

3 Report of the Primary Education Review Body, Stationery Office, Dublin, 1990, p. 72.

4 Statistical Report 1997/98, table 2.1.

5 Pre-school service has a broad scope and is defined by section 49 of the Act as “any pre-school, playgroup, day nursery, crèche, day care or other similar service which caters for pre-school children …”.

6 National Childcare Strategy, Report of the Partnership 2000 Expert Working Group on Childcare, Stationery Office, Dublin, January 1999, p. 29.

7 Ibid., Appendix 3.2

8 Area Development Management Ltd. was established in 1992 to manage the allocation of funds to local level partnerships for various services, including childcare.

9 Strengthening Families for Life: Final Report of the Commission on the Family, Stationery Office, Dublin, July 1998, p. 238.

10 Care from relative includes relative’s home and child’s home; childminder/other covers childminder’s home, at home with non-relative and mother and toddler group.

11 O’Flaherty, J., Intervention in the Early Years An Evaluation of the High/Scope Curriculum, National Children’s Bureau, London, 1995, p. 38.

12 A Review of Services for Young Children in the European Union, 1990-1995, European Commission Network on Childcare, January 1996, p. 2.

13 Forum Report, p. 27.

14 Hayes, N., The Case for a National Policy on Early Education”, Poverty & Policy Discussion Paper No. 2, Combat Poverty Agency, Dublin, p. 19.

15 Hayes, N., O’Flaherty, J., A Window on Early Education in Ireland: The First National Report of the IEA Preprimary Project, Dublin Institute of Technology, 1997, p. 110.

16 The ratio has fallen from 27.5 in 1988/89 to 21.8 in 1997/98. Source: Key Education Statistics, Department of Education and Science.

17 In 1977/78, 81% of infants were in classes of at least 30 pupils. By 1987/88, this figure had dropped to two thirds of infants, while 4% were in classes of 40 or more. The equivalent proportions ten years later are substantially lower at 33% in classes of 30+ and 0.2% in classes of at least 40 pupils. Source: Statistical Reports, 1977/78, 1987/88, 1997/98. Further improvements have since been recorded.

18 Source: Statistical Report 1997/98, table 2.5. The equivalent percentages for 1st through 5th standards ranged from 72% to 76%.

19 Hayes, N., O’Flaherty, J., op. cit., p. 110.

20 Reducing Class Size, What Do We Know?, National Institute on Student Achievement, Curriculum, and Assessment, Office of Educational Research and Improvement, U.S. Department of Education, March 1999, p. 10.

21 Class Size Research and the Quality of Education, NAHT and the University of Nottingham, 1996, p. 65.

22 Preventing Reading Difficulties in Young Children, National Research Council, National Academy Press, Washington, D.C., 1998, p. 230.

23 Hayes, N., O’Flaherty, J., p. 111.

24 Report of the Partnership 2000 Expert Working Group on Childcare , op. cit., p. 27.

25 National Forum Report, op. cit., p. 108.

26 National Research Council, 1998, op. cit., p. 279.

27 Forum Report, op. cit., p. 42.

28 Background paper for the National Forum for Early Childhood Education, op. cit., p. 164.

1 Kellaghan, T., 1977; Barnett, W.S., 1995.

2 OECD, 1998.

3 Schweinart L., and Weikart D., 1980; McKey et al, 1985; Kellaghan, T., & Greany, B.J., 1993; Karoly, L., Greenwood, P., et al, 1998.

4 National Forum Report, 1998, p. 43.

5 National Forum Report, 1998, p. 121.

6 Educational Disadvantage in Ireland, Kellaghan, T., et al, Combat Poverty Agency Research Report Series No. 20, Dublin, 1995, p. 63.

7 O’Flaherty, J., 1995; OECD 1998.

8 Ball, C., Start Right – The Importance of Early Learning, RSA, UK, 1998.

1 O’Flaherty, J., op. cit., 1995, p. 19.

2 Ibid.


3 Hayes, N., The Case for a National Policy on Education, Poverty & Policy Discussion Paper No. 2, Combat Poverty Agency, 1995, pp. 12-13.

4 O’Flaherty, 1995, op. cit., p. 20.

5 Forum Report, p. 203.

6 Section 4(1)(a).

7 Forum Report, p. 204.

8 Hayes, N., & O’Flaherty, J., A Window on Early Education in Ireland: The First National Report of the IEA Preprimary Project, Dublin Institute of Technology, 1997, p. 14.

9 National Forum Report, p. 103.

10 Ibid., p. 111.

11 Ibid., p. 108.

12 Ibid., Background Paper, p. 165.

13 Sessional services are defined in section 2 of the Guidelines as the provision of: a service offering a planned programme to pre-school children, a service of up to 3.5 hours. Services may include pre-schools, playgroups, crèches, montessori groups, naíonraí or similar services which generally cater for children in the 2-6 year age bracket.

14 Commission on the Family, 1998, p. 248.

1 This should be taken to mean in the home or in another relatively informal setting, such as a childminder’s home. The appropriate adult in these instances is the parent or other adult playing a significant part in the child’s care and education; for ease, the term “parent” is used to cover all of these persons. Specific issues arise in the case of children in foster care and it may be appropriate for the Working Group on Foster Care (established by the Minister of State at the Department of Health and Children) which is due to report early in 2000, to comment on these issues.

1 Reducing Class Size: What Do We Know? National Institute on Student Achievement, Curriculum and Assessment, Office of Educational Research and Improvement, US Department of Education, p. 2.

2 Ibid.

1 Report of the Special Education Review Committee, Stationery Office, Dublin, October 1993, p. 18.

1 OECD, 1998.

2 Karoly, L., Greenwood, P., et al, 1998, p. 99.

3 Kellaghan, T., and Greany, B.J., 1993.

4 O’Flaherty, J., Intervention in the Early Years An Evaluation of the High/Scope Curriculum, National Children’s Bureau, London, 1995.

5 Karoly, L., Greenwood, P., et al, 1998; Winkly, D., 1999.

6 Kellaghan, T., et al, Educational Disadvantage in Ireland, Combat Poverty Agency Research Report Series No. 20, Dublin, 1995.

7 Kellaghan, T., & Greaney, B.J., The Educational Development of Students following Participation in a Preschool Programme in a Disadvantaged Area, ERC, Dublin, 1993.

8 Educational Research Centre, Dublin, Early Start Preschool Programme, Final Evaluation Report, 1998.

9 Kellaghan, T., et al, Educational Disadvantage in Ireland, 1995, p. 62.

1 Throughout this White Paper, references to parents should be interpreted as including guardians, foster parents and other significant adults in a child’s life.

2 National Forum, 1998, p. 36.

3 Hargreaves, D., Improving Secondary Schools, London, I.L.E.A., 1984, cited in Early Childhood Education Issues and Concerns, INTO, Dublin, 1995.

4 Smyth, E., Do Schools Differ? Academic and Personal Development among Pupils in the Second-Level Sector, Economic and Social Research Institute/Oak Tree Press, Dublin, 1999, p. 222.

5 National Evaluation of The Even Start Family Literacy Program, U.S. Department of Education,1998.

6 White, K., Taylor, M., and Moss, V., Does research support claims about the benefits of involving parents in early intervention programmes?, Review of Educational Research, 1992 cited in O’Flaherty, J., 1995, p. 24.

7 O’Flaherty, J., ibid., 1995.

8 Commission on the Family, 1998, p. 86.

9 Commission on the Family, 1998, pp. 99-100.

10 National Forum Report, 1998, p. 39.

11 Ibid., p. 38.

1 Report of the Partnership 2000 Expert Working Group on Childcare , 1998, p. 26.

2 Department for Education and Employment, Press Release 371/99, 2 August 1999.

1 Chandler, quoted in Organizational Theory: Structure, Design and Applications, Stephen P. Robbins, 3rd Ed. 1990, p. 126.

2 National Forum Report, 1998, p. 199.



3 Forum Report, p. 138.

4 Early Start Evaluation, 1998, p. 114.
Download 0.55 Mb.

Share with your friends:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10




The database is protected by copyright ©sckool.org 2020
send message

    Main page