Dese model Curriculum



Download 88 Kb.
Date04.05.2017
Size88 Kb.

DESE Model Curriculum

GRADE LEVEL/UNIT TITLE: 7/Inventive Inventors Course Code: ELA




COURSE INTRODUCTION:

In seventh grade, students continue reading texts from numerous angles and for a variety of purposes. Through a wide and deep reading of literature and literary nonfiction, students read increasingly complex texts that extend across genres, cultures, and centuries in order to gain insights into the human condition. These texts serve as models for students’ own thinking and writing. Students follow a process to write in a variety of genres, including responses to literature, reflective essays, stories, and short research projects. In addition, they create multimedia presentations and develop their skills of argumentation. They participate in class discussion, practice reading literature expressively, and deliver presentations. They demonstrate increasing sophistication in all aspects of language use, from vocabulary and syntax to the development and organization of ideas. By the end of seventh grade, students are ready to begin studying complex aspects of literature.

In this document, teaching structures such as interactive writing, reading workshop, Socratic Seminar, etc. are highlighted in blue and linked directly to the State Literacy Plan in order to provide a more in-depth explanation.




UNIT DESCRIPTION:

The unit entitled Inventive Inventors contains five lengthy writing lessons centered on the topic of inventions or inventors. In the first lesson, students will do brief review of narrative text and will write two types of narrative texts. In the second lesson, students will learn how to use information from digital and print resources to support claims and will write an essay that proves a claim to be true. In the third lesson, the student will write an informative/explanatory essay to examine a topic. The student will consider factors such as development, organization, style, purpose, and audience when writing the essay. In the fourth lesson, students will learn about argumentative essays and will write an argumentative essay. In the fifth lesson, students will do a brief review of how to problem-solve unfamiliar words when reading. Students will work collaboratively throughout the unit and will use technology to conduct research, to share information and ideas and collaborate with others.

Diverse Learners

Strategies for meeting the needs of all learners including gifted students, English Language Learners (ELL) and students with disabilities can be found at http://www.dese.mo.gov/divimprove/curriculum/UD-Model-Curriculum-Introduction-Sheet.pdf. Resources based on the Universal Design for Learning principles are available at www.cast.org.

Provide Feedback


SUGGESTED UNIT TIMELINE: approximately 4 or 5 weeks

CLASS PERIOD (min.): 50 minutes daily


ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:

1. When writing arguments, why is it important to support claims and consider opposing viewpoints?

2. Why is it essential to write with the purpose and audience in mind?

3. Why is it important to draw evidence from digital and print resources to support analysis, reflection, and research?

4. How do narratives differ from informational texts?

5. Why is it important to use creditable resources when doing research?

6. How might a person problem-solve unfamiliar words when reading?





ESSENTIAL MEASURABLE LEARNING OBJECTIVES



CCSS LEARNING GOALS (Anchor Standards/Clusters)

CROSSWALK TO STANDARDS

GLEs/CLEs

PS

CCSS

OTHER

DOK

1. When writing arguments, the student will introduce claims, support them with clear and relevant evidence, acknowledge opposing claims, use effective wording and transitions, maintain a formal style and provide a concluding statement that follows from the arguments presented.

W.1: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.


W.3.A.7.a

W.2.B.7.a

W.2.B.7.b

W.2.A.7.b

W.2.C.7.a

W.2.C.7.b

I.1.A.7

W.2.C.7.e



W.2.A.7.a


2.1

3.5



W.7.1.a

W.7.1.b


W.7.1.c

W.7.1.d


W.7.1.e





2

3


2. When writing, the student will conduct short research projects to answer a question, drawing on several sources and generate additional or related focus questions as needed.

W.7: Conduct short, as well as sustained research projects based on focused questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.




1.1

1.2


1.3

1.4



W.7.7





3

4


3. When writing, the student will use relevant and credible information from multiple print and digital resources and provide basic bibliographic information for sources.

W.8: Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate the information while avoiding plagiarism.

I.1.A.7

1.2

1.4


W.7.8




2

3


4. In writing, the student will use technology to produce and publish writing and collaborate with others.

W.6: Use technology, including the internet, to produce and publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others.


I.1.B.7.c

W.1.A.7.a

W.1.A.7.b

W.1.A.7.c

W.1.A.7.d

W.1.A.7.e



1.4

2.1


W.7.6





2

3

4



5. The student will write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and concepts and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.

W.2: Write informative and explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through effective selection, organization and analysis of content.

W.2.A.7.a

W.2.A.7.b

W.3.A.7.a

W.2.B.7.a

W.2.B.7.b

W.2.C.7.a

W.2.C.7.b

W.2.C.7.e




2.1

W.7.2.a

W.7.2.b


W.7.2.c

W.7.2.d


W.7.2.e

W.7.2.f





2

6. The student will produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to the task, purpose, and audience.

W.4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to the task, purpose, and audience.

W.2.A.7.a

W.2.A.7.b



2.1

W.7.4




2

7. The student will use a writing process of planning, rough draft, editing and revising, rewriting or trying a new approach.

W.5: Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.


W.1.A.7.a

W.1.A.7.b

W.1.A.7.c

W.1.A.7.d

W.1.A.7.e


2.1

W.7.5





2

3


8. The student will write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective techniques, well-chosen details and well-structured event sequences.

W.3: Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective techniques, well-chosen details and well-structured event sequences.

W.2.A.7.a

W.2.A.7.b

W.2.C.7.a

W.2.C.7.b

W.2.C.7.e

W.2.D.7.a

W.2.D.7.b

W.3.A.7.a



2.1

W.7.3.a

W.7.3.b


W.7.3.c

W.7.3.d


W.7.3.e




2

3


9. In writing, the student will draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

W.9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

W.3.A.7.a


2.1

W.7.9.b






2

3


10. The student will write routinely over extended time frames for a variety of reasons, purposes and audiences during short and lengthy time periods.

W.10: Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes and audiences.

W.1.A.7.a

W.1.A.7.b

W.1.A.7.c

W.1.A.7.d

W.1.A.7.e

W.2.A.7.a

W.2.A.7.b

W.3.A.7.a

W.3.A.7.b

W.3.A.7.c




2.1

W.7.10




3

11. When reading, students will problem-solve unknown words by using context clues, Greek or Latin affixes and roots or consulting resources to clarify, verify or determine meaning.

L.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple meaning words and phrases by using context clues, analyzing meaningful word parts, and consulting general and specialized reference materials, as appropriate.

R.1.E.7.a

R.1.E.7.b

R.1.E.7.c


1.6

L.7.4.a

L.7.4.b


L.7.4.c

L.7.4.d





2

ASSESSMENT DESCRIPTIONS*:

Formative Assessment 1: Using the Writing Process to Write Narratives: Students will use the writing process to respond to a writing prompt to write a narrative essay to describe a make-believe event about an invention. Student Prompt: “Inventors are creative and intelligent. These character traits lead to their being able to invent new gadgets and ideas. Write a make-believe narrative about an inventor who creates a new gadget or process to make a job easier.” Students should create a plan prior to writing, self-edit and ask a peer for suggestions, revise and rewrite and publish the last draft paper on the classroom Wiki, Blog, or Website. The paper will be scored using the Narrative Scoring Guide. (Objectives 4, 6, 7, 8 and 10)
Formative Assessment 2: Using Digital and Print Resources to Support Claims: Students will use information gained from researching print and digital resources to write an essay that proves the following claim to be true. Claim: “Inventors love problems. Unlike most of us, the inventive personality actually seeks out what doesn’t work, what gives people fits, or what prevents a smooth flow in a system. Once inventors find these things, they love to develop or invent solutions.” The paper will be scored using the Supporting Claims Scoring Guide. (Objectives 1, 2, 3, 9 and 10)
Formative Assessment 3: Writing Informative/Explanatory Essays: Students will use digital and print resources to respond to a writing prompt to write an informative/explanatory essay about inventors and inventions. Student Prompt: “Inventors have literally changed the world. Write an informative essay that explains how inventors have changed the world.” The paper will be scored using the Informative/Explanatory Scoring Guide. (Objectives 4, 5, 6,7 and 10)
Formative Assessment 4: Argumentative Essays: Students will use information gained from researching print and digital resources to write an argumentative essay to respond to the prompt. Writing Prompt: “Without inventors and inventions, the Industrial Revolution would not have been possible.” The paper will be scored using the Teacher and Student Argumentative Scoring Guide. (Objectives 1, 3, 6, and 9).
Formative Assessment 5: Problem-Solving Unfamiliar Words: The teacher will observe students using problem solving to identify and determine meaning of unfamiliar words during oral reading. Teacher will use a Problem-Solving Unknown Words Checklist to capture students’ performance related to: the use of context clues, chunking words into smaller parts, using roots and affixes, and/or using appropriate digital and print resources. Words with Greek and Latin roots or affixes will be placed on the word wall in the classroom. (Objective 11)

Obj. #

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES (research-based): (Teacher Methods)

4

6

7

8

10



Lesson 1: Using the Writing Process to Write Narratives:
1. Advance Organizer: The teacher will activate prior knowledge by asking two questions: 1) What are two types of narratives? 2) How are narratives usually structured or organized? Have students share ideas with one other person and with the class. The teacher will clarify/add to students’ ideas.

2. Assessment for Learning: State the objective in student friendly terms. “In this lesson you will review how to write narrative papers and will use the writing process to write narratives about real events and make-believe events.”

3. Direct Teaching: Review the meaning of personal narratives and imaginative narratives and the parts of narrative essays. Define and discuss the concepts of development, organization, style, purpose, and audience and share a process that may be used to write narrative essays. Narrative Writing Tutorial: http://www.iss.k12.nc.us/writing/default.htm; Description of Personal Narrative: http://www.iss.k12.nc.us/writing/desc_p.htm; Description of Imaginative Narrative: http://www.iss.k12.nc.us/writing/desc_i.htm; Parts of a Narrative: http://www.iss.k12.nc.us/writing/pos_i.htm; Transition Words for Narratives: http://www.iss.k12.nc.us/writing/transitional.htm;

4. Share Scoring Criteria/Examine Exemplar Papers: Share the Narrative Scoring Guide and discuss the criteria that will be used to score the essays with students, and ask students to work in small groups to score several essays using the scoring criteria. Sample narrative essays: Sample personal Narratives: http://www.iss.k12.nc.us/writing/sample_p.htm; Sample Imaginative Narratives: http://www.iss.k12.nc.us/writing/sample_i.htm;

5. Share and Discuss Results: Ask students to share and discuss results of essay scoring with the class.

6. Writing Practice: Ask each student to respond to a writing prompt to write a narrative essay to describe a time in his/her life when he/she would have liked to be an inventor to create some type of gadget or process to make a job or task easier.

7. Assessment for Learning: When finished, have the students evaluate their essays using the Narrative Scoring Guide.

8. Peer Edit/Input: Ask students to exchange essays and evaluate another student’s essay and write suggestions for improvement. When finished, have students return essays for review and revision. All students will revise essays based on self-evaluation results and peer suggestions.

9. Using Technology to Collaborate: Ask students to post their revised essays on the classroom Wiki or Blog and comment on two other essays.

10. Formative Assessment 1: Using the Writing Process to Write Narratives: Ask each student to respond to a writing prompt to write a narrative essay to describe a make-believe event about an invention. Student Prompt: “Inventors are creative and intelligent. These character traits lead to their being able to invent new gadgets and ideas. Write a make-believe narrative about an inventor who creates a new gadget or process to make a job easier.” Students should create a plan prior to writing, self-edit and ask a peer for suggestions, revise and rewrite and publish the last draft paper on the classroom Wiki, Blog, or Website.



Obj. #

INSTRUCTIONAL ACTIVITIES: ( What Students Do)

4

6

7

8

10


Lesson 1: Using the Writing Process to Write Narratives:
1. Answer two questions. 1) What are two types of narratives? 2) Explain how are narratives are usually structured or organized. Share ideas with a classmate.

2. In this lesson you will review how to write narrative papers and will use the writing process to write a narrative about a real event and make-believe event.

3. Work with your teacher and classmates to review the meaning of personal narratives and imaginative narratives, the parts of narrative essays and the characteristics of quality written narratives.

4. Learn how narratives will be scored by reviewing and discussing the Narrative Scoring Guide. Work with your classmates to score several essays using the scoring criteria.

5. Share and discuss the results of essay scoring with your teacher and classmates.

6. Respond to a writing prompt to write a narrative essay. Student Prompt: “Describe a time in his/her life when he/she would have liked to be an inventor to create some type of gadget or process to make a job or task easier.” Students should create a plan prior to writing.

7. Evaluate your essay using the Narrative Scoring Guide.

8. Exchange essays with another person. Evaluate each other’s essay using the Narrative Scoring Guide. Write suggestions for improvement. Return the essay to the writer for review and revision. Revise your essay based on self-evaluation results and peer suggestions.

9. Post your last draft essay on the classroom Wiki, Blog or website and comment on two other essays.

10. Take the Formative Assessment.




Obj. #

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES: (research-based): (What Teachers Do)

1

2

3

9

10

Lesson 2: Using Digital and Print Resources to Support Claims
1. Assessment for Learning: The teacher will share the objective and purpose for the lesson using student friendly language. “During this lesson, you will learn how to use different kinds of sources, both print and media sources and will use the information to write a paper to support a claim.”

2. Activating Prior Knowledge: Ask each student to do a personal brainstorm to list the different kinds of media sources and the different kinds of print sources.

3. Cooperative Learning: Have students count off, and students with the same number get into a small group to share ideas.

4. Direct Teaching About Technology/Research: NOTE: If students have already had instruction in research and the use of technology, you may want to skip Steps 4 and/or 5. The teacher will use information from the website: http://dept.sccd.ctc.edu/tlc/resources/teach.html to teach students about the different types of internet sources, how to find information using the internet and to use search tools, how to distinguish the different types of information, how to evaluate information obtained from internet sources, how to think critically about the information they find, how to cite sources and respect copyright. Additionally, the teacher will do a brief review of the various types of print sources, how to locate print sources, how to determine which print source works best based-on purpose. The teacher may use the following sources to find information: Weaving Your Assignments Into the Web: http://nhclibrary.nhmccd.edu/library/instruction/web.html; Noodle Tools: http://www.noodletools.com/; Internet Public Library: Research and Writing: http://www.ipl.org/teen/aplus/; Research Paper.com: Research Paper.com: http://www.researchpaper.com/; Teaching and Learning on the Web: http://www.mcli.dist.maricopa.edu/tl/; Search Engine Watch: http://www.searchenginewatch.com; Library Smart: http://www.librarysmart.com/working/home.asp; and Maricopa: What a Site! http://www.mcli.dist.maricopa.edu/show/what/ref.html

5. Guided Practice or Scavenger Hunt of Sources: Give student an opportunity to work alone or with a partner to use the Internet to locate various internet sources and find specific pieces of information. You may want students to do a Scavenger Hunt of Sources. See website: http://jlee.vansd.org/jleeweb/pages/links/scavenger.html

6. Direct Teaching About Supporting Claims and Making Arguments: Discuss with students the meaning of claims, counterclaims, arguments, how to support claims with clear and relevant evidence and how to acknowledge opposing claims. The following websites may prove helpful: http://www.shoreline.edu/doldham/101/html/what%20is%20a%20c-a.htm; http://transformingclassrooms.pbworks.com/f/Guidetocounterarguments.pdf; http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/659/01/;

http://www.visualthesaurus.com/cm/lessons/making-an-argument-effective-use-of-transition-words/;

Additionally, share with students the information on the Supporting Claims Scoring Guide so students will have a clear understanding of how the paper will be scored and what is expected when writing a paper to support a claim.

7. Writing Practice: Allow students to work with a partner to respond to the writing prompt. Writing Prompt: “Use information gained from researching print and digital resources to write an essay that proves the following claim to be true. Claim: “Successful inventors know more than just a technical sequence of steps. What really makes them successful is the personality characteristics they possess. They have a mindset that enables them to make the right decisions when they need to be made. While this is a bit harder to learn and master than the steps of a process, it is no less important.” Your paper will be scored using the Supporting Claims Scoring Guide. Make sure you have a clear understanding of the information on the scoring guide.

8. Administer Formative Assessment 2: Using Digital and Print Resources to Support Claims: Ask students to respond to the writing prompt. Use information gained from researching print and digital resources to write an essay that proves the following claim to be true. Claim: “Inventors love problems. Unlike most of us, the inventive personality actually seeks out what doesn’t work, what gives people fits, or what prevents a smooth flow in a system. Once they find these things, they love to develop or invent solutions.” Your paper will be scored using the Supporting Claims Scoring Guide. Make sure you have a clear understanding of the information on the scoring guide.

9. Metacognition/Reflection: Ask students to respond in their journal to the prompt. Prompt: The most difficult thing about using a variety of sources to support claims is_____ because____.”


Obj. #

INSTRUCTIONAL ACTIVITIES: (What Students Do)

1

2

3

9

10


Lesson 2: Using Digital and Print Resources to Support Claims

1. Make sure you understand the objective and purpose for the lesson. “To learn how to use different kinds of sources, both print and media sources and will use the information to write a paper to support a claim.”

2. Do a personal brainstorm to list the different kinds of media sources and the different kinds of print sources.

3. Get into small groups to share ideas with classmates.

4. Listen carefully and take notes as the teacher shares information about the different types of internet sources, how to find information using the internet and to use search tools, how to distinguish the different types of information, how to evaluate information obtained from internet sources, how to think critically about the information they find, how to cite sources and respect copyright.

5. Use the Internet to locate various internet sources and find specific pieces of information.

6. Listen carefully and take notes as the teacher discusses the meaning of claims, counterclaims, arguments, how to support claims with clear and relevant evidence and how to acknowledge opposing claims and shares the information on the Supporting Claims Scoring Guide .

7. Work with a partner to respond to the writing prompt. Writing Prompt: “Use information gained from researching print and digital resources to write an essay that proves the following claim to be true. Claim: Successful inventors know more than just a technical sequence of steps. What really makes them successful is the personality characteristics they possess. They have a mindset that enables them to make the right decisions when they need to be made. While this is a bit harder to learn and master than the steps of a process, it is no less important. Your paper will be scored using the Supporting Claims Scoring Guide. Make sure you have a clear understanding of the information on the scoring guide.”

8. Take Formative Assessment 2: Using Digital and Print Resources to Support Claims: Respond to the writing prompt. Writing Prompt: “Use information gained from researching print and digital resources to write an essay that proves the following claim to be true. Claim: Inventors love problems. Unlike most of us, the inventive personality actually seeks out what doesn’t work, what gives people fits, or what prevents a smooth flow in a system. Once they find these things, they love to develop or invent solutions. Your paper will be scored using the Supporting Claims Scoring Guide. Make sure you have a clear understanding of the information on the scoring guide.”

9. Journal to the prompt. Prompt: “The most difficult thing about using a variety of sources to support claims is_____ because____.”



Obj. #

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES (research-based): (Teacher Methods)

4

5

6

7

10


Lesson 3: Writing Informative/Explanatory Essays:

1. Advance Organizer: The teacher will activate prior knowledge by asking two questions: 1) What is informative writing and when is it used? 2) What is explanatory writing and when is it used? Have students share ideas with one other person and with the class.

2. Assessment for Learning: State the objective in student friendly terms. “In this lesson you will write informative/explanatory texts/essays in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to the task, purpose, and audience.”

3. Direct Teaching: Review the meaning of informative/explanatory texts/essays and the parts of informative/explanatory essays. Define and discuss the concepts of development, organization, style, purpose, and audience and share a process that may be used to write informative/explanatory essays. Websites: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/685/02/; http://www.ehow.com/how_5880410_write-explanatory-essay.html; http://www.tailoredessays.com/how-write/explanatory-essay.htm; http://www.tailoredessays.com/how-write/informative-essay.htm

4. Share Scoring Criteria/Examine Exemplar Papers: Share the Informative/Explanatory Scoring Guide that will be used to score the essays with students, and ask students to work in small groups to score several essays using the scoring criteria. Sample essays:

http://www.thewritesource.com/studentmodels/ws2k-musiced.htm;

http://www.thewritesource.com/studentmodels/ws2k-phoneed.htm;

http://www.thewritesource.com/studentmodels/ws2k-bestgirl.htm;

http://www.thewritesource.com/studentmodels/ws2k-summer.htm;

http://www.thewritesource.com/studentmodels/ws2k-cheated.htm;

http://www.thewritesource.com/studentmodels/ws2k-pawpaw.htm;

http://www.thewritesource.com/studentmodels/ws2k-friendship.htm;

5. Share and Discuss Results: Ask students to share and discuss results of essay scoring with the class.

6. Writing Practice: Ask students to work with one other person to respond to a writing prompt to write an informative/explanatory essay about inventions. Student Prompt: “Since before Thomas Edison until today, inventors have literally changed the world. There will always be opportunities for inventors because all the problems in the world need to be solved. Write an informative essay that explains what types of inventions may be needed to help solve some current problems that exist in today’s world.”

7. Assessment for Learning: When finished, have the pairs evaluate their essays using the Informative/Explanatory Scoring Guide.

8. Peer Edit/Input: Ask pairs to exchange essays and evaluate another pair’s essay and write suggestions for improvement. When finished, pairs will return essays for review and revision. All pairs will revise essays based on self-evaluation results and peer suggestions.

9. Using Technology to Collaborate: Ask students to post their revised essays on the classroom Wiki or Blog and comment on two other essays.

10. Formative Assessment Lesson 3: Writing Informative/Explanatory Essays: Ask students to use digital and print resources and to work alone to respond to a writing prompt to write an informative/explanatory essay about inventors and inventions. Student Prompt: “Inventors have literally changed the world. Write an informative essay that explains how inventors have changed the world.” Publish your paper on the classroom Wiki or Blog and offer suggestions to two other peers. Revise your paper based on suggestions from your peers. Your paper will be scored using the Informative/Explanatory Scoring Guide so make sure you have a clear understanding of its contents.



Obj. #

INSTRUCTIONAL ACTIVITIES: (What Students Do)

4

5

6

7

10

Lesson 3: Writing Informative/Explanatory Essays:

1. Answer two questions: 1) What is informative writing and when is it used? 2) What is explanatory writing and when is it used? Share ideas with one other person and with the class.

2. Make sure you understand the objective of the lesson…to write informative/explanatory texts/papers in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to the task, purpose, and audience.

3. With your teacher and classmates discuss the concepts of development, organization, style, purpose, and audience and a process that may be used to write informative/explanatory essays.

4. Work with a small group and use Informative/Explanatory Scoring Guide to score the several essays. Discuss and share scoring results with classmates.

5. Work with one other person to write an informative/explanatory essay about inventions. Student Prompt: “Since before Thomas Edison until today, inventors have literally changed the world. There will always be opportunities for inventors because all the problems in the world need to be solved. Write an informative essay that explains what types of inventions may be needed to help solve some current problems that exist in today’s world.”

6. When finished, evaluate your essay using the Informative/Explanatory Scoring Guide.

7. Exchange papers with another pair, evaluate their essay, and write suggestions for improvement.

8. Revise your essay based on your self-evaluation and suggestions from peers.

9. Post your revised essay on the classroom Wiki or Blog and comment on two other essays.

10. Take the Formative Assessment.


Obj. #

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES (research-based): (Teacher Methods)

1

3

6

9


Lesson 4: Writing Argumentative Essays:

1. Advance Organizer and Cooperative Learning: The teacher will ask students to write the characteristics they think a quality argumentative paper would contain. Have students use a Four-Corner Sharing (Kagan) strategy to share ideas. http://www.woodrow.org/teachers/bi/1998/presentations/fortenberry/

2. Direct Teaching: Discuss with students the definition, the purpose and the characteristics of argumentative papers. http://www.tailoredessays.com/how-write/argumentative-essay.htm; http://www.roanestate.edu/owl/argument.html; http://www.buowl.boun.edu.tr/students/types%20of%20essays/ARGUMENTATIVE%20ESSAY.pdf

3. Use of Exemplar Papers: Have students look at an exemplar argumentative paper (CCSS/ Appendix, C, Page 38) OR papers obtained from the Internet from the website: http://spot.pcc.edu/~dramirez/GreatEssays/argumentessay.html to get additional ideas to add to their listing of characteristics of a quality argumentative papers.

4. Student Development of Scoring Criteria: Give the students the Teacher’s Argumentative Scoring Guide and have students compare their listing of characteristics to the writing scoring guide provided. Ask students to work with classmates to develop a Teacher’s and Students’ Argumentative Writing Soring Guide that includes the information from the teacher’s scoring guide as well as some ideas from students.

5. Scoring Practice: Ask students to use the scoring guide developed in Step 4 to practice scoring the argumentative essay about cellphones http://www.freeessayexample.com/2009/12/argumentative-essay.html Have students share and discuss results of scoring with the class.

6. Writing Practice: Ask students to work with a partner and use digital and print resources to gain the necessary information to respond to the writing prompt and write an argumentative essay. Writing Prompt: “The invention of the cotton gin made the cotton industry of the south explode.”

7. Assessment for Learning: When finished, have the pairs evaluate their essays using the Teacher’s and Students’ Argumentative Writing Soring Guide.

8. Peer Edit/Input: Ask pairs to exchange essays and evaluate another pair’s essay and write suggestions for improvement. When finished, pairs will return essays for review and revision. All pairs will revise essays based on self-evaluation results and peer suggestions.

9. Using Technology to Collaborate: Ask students to post their revised essays on the classroom Wiki or Blog and comment on two other essays.

10. Formative Assessment 4: Writing Argumentative Essays: Ask students to use information gained from researching print and digital resources to write an argumentative essay to respond to the prompt. Writing Prompt: “Without inventors and inventions, the Industrial Revolution would not have been possible.”


Obj. #

INSTRUCTIONAL ACTIVITIES: (What Students Do)

1

3

6

9

Lesson 4: Writing Argumentative Essays:

1. Write the characteristics of a quality argumentative paper and share ideas with classmates.

2. Listen carefully and take notes as your teacher discusses the definition, the purpose and the characteristics of argumentative papers.

3. Look at an exemplar argumentative paper and add ideas to your listing of characteristics of quality argumentative papers.

4. Compare your listing of characteristics to the characteristics on the writing scoring guide provided by your teacher. Work with classmates and the teacher to develop a Teacher’s and Student’s Argumentative Writing Soring Guide.

5. Use the scoring guide developed in Step 4 to practice scoring an argumentative essay about cellphones. Share and discuss results of scoring with your classmates.

6. Work with a partner and use digital and print resources to gain the necessary information to respond to the writing prompt and write an argumentative essay. Writing Prompt: “The invention of the cotton gin made the cotton industry of the south explode.”

7. Work with a partner to evaluate your essay using the Teacher’s and Student’s Argumentative Writing Soring Guide.

8. Exchange essays and evaluate another pair’s essay and write suggestions for improvement. When finished, return the essay to the writers for review and revision.

9. Post your revised essay on the classroom Wiki or Blog and comment on two other essays.

10. Take the Formative Assessment: Use information gained from researching print and digital resources to write an argumentative essay to respond to the prompt. Writing Prompt: “Without inventors and inventions, the Industrial Revolution would not have been possible.”



Obj. #

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES (research-based): (Teacher Methods)

11

Lesson 5: Problem-Solving Unfamiliar Words:

1. Assessment for Learning: State the objective of the lesson in student friendly language. “In this lesson, you will review and briefly practice the processes for problem-solving unknown words by using context clues, breaking the words into chunks and using your knowledge of (Greek and Latin) affixes and roots as clues to determine word meaning. You will do a very brief review of using references both print and digital such as the dictionary, glossaries and thesauruses to determine pronunciation and determine/verify word meaning.”

2. Advance Organizer: Ask students to write on a sticky note the method they use most often to figure-out the meaning of unfamiliar words when reading. Collate the results on chart paper or on the white board. If possible, have students arrange themselves into a human graph. Briefly discuss results.

3. Direct Teaching of Context Clues: Discuss with students the four most direct context clues used by authors (definition/explanation clue, restatement/synonym clue, contrast/antonym clue, and gist clue) When Kids Can’t Read, What Should Teachers Do? A Guide for Teachers 6-12 by Lylene Beers or use materials from the website: http://www.edhelper.com/language/Context_Clues.htm

4. Modeling of Context Clues: Use a white board or chart to demonstrate for students how the use the 4 types of context clues to figure-out word meaning.

5. Guided Practice with Context Clues: Give each student one page of text at the 6th grade level that contains at least 10 words that are blackened out. The student will use context clues to try to figure-out what the words might be.

6. Cooperative Learning Structure: Have students number off (1-4) and get into small groups to share their answers with peers. Then, discuss answers with the class, and ask students to tell the type of context clue that was used to figure-out meaning.

7. Brief Review: Provide students with a reference chart with appropriate grade-level Greek and Latin affixes and roots, and ask students to briefly review the information.

8. Word Study: Orally read a one page informational text to students, as they follow along a printed copy. Ten words in the story (with Greek and Latin roots and affixes) will be highlighted. Students will work in pairs and use their reference chart to try to figure-out the word meaning and pronunciation of each of the ten words (i.e. hypothermia, myopic, transcendental, etc.)

9. Cooperative Learning Structure: Have pairs join with another pair to compare answers. If there are differences of opinion, the students should use print and digital references to check meaning and pronunciation. Note: If students are unfamiliar with how to use print or digital resources, the teacher will need to teach or briefly review for students how to use them.

10. Administer Formative Assessment 5: Problem Solving Unfamiliar Words: Observe students using problem solving to identify and determine meaning of unfamiliar words during oral reading. Use a checklist to capture students’ performance related to: the use of context clues, chunking words into smaller parts, using roots and affixes, and/or using appropriate digital and print resources. Place words with Greek and Latin roots or affixes on the word wall in the classroom.


Obj. #

INSTRUCTIONAL ACTIVITIES: (What Students Do)

11

Lesson 5: Problem-Solving Unfamiliar Words:

1. In this lesson, you will review and briefly practice the processes for problem-solving unknown words by using context clues, breaking the words into chunks and using your knowledge of (Greek and Latin) affixes and roots as clues to determine word meaning. You will also do a very brief review of using references both print and digital such as the dictionary, glossaries and thesauruses to determine pronunciation and determine/verify word meaning.

2. On a sticky note write the method you use most often to figure-out the meaning of unfamiliar words when reading. Discuss and share with your peers.

3. You will be given one page of text that contains at least 10 words that are blackened out. You will use what you learned about context clues to try to figure-out what the words might be.

4. Share your ideas with peers using a sharing structure.

5. Briefly review Greek and Latin affixes and roots with your teacher using a reference chart.

6. The teacher will read a one page informational text as you will follow along on a printed copy. Ten words in the story (with Greek and Latin roots and affixes) will be highlighted. Work with one other student and use a reference chart to try to figure-out the word meaning and pronunciation of each of the ten words (i.e. hypothermia, myopic, transcendental, etc.)

7. Join another pair and compare answers. If there are differences of opinion, use print and digital references to check meaning and pronunciation.



8. Take the formative assessment. You will be asked to read orally by your teacher. She/he will observe your use of context clues and other methods to problem solve unfamiliar words.

UNIT RESOURCES: (include internet addresses for linking)
How to Write All Types of Essays

http://www.tailoredessays.com/how-write
Sample Prompts for Personal Narratives

http://www.iss.k12.nc.us/writing/prompts_p.htm
Sample Prompts for Imaginative Narratives

http://www.iss.k12.nc.us/writing/prompts_i.htm
Writing Prompt Generator

http://www.jc-schools.net/write/create.htm






Download 88 Kb.

Share with your friends:




The database is protected by copyright ©sckool.org 2020
send message

    Main page