Choice based credit system


II. Industrial development strategy and its impact on social structure



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II. Industrial development strategy and its impact on social structure

Essential Readings:


A. Aggarwal, (2006) ‘Special Economic Zones: Revisiting the Policy Debate’, in Economic and Political Weekly, XLI (43-44), pp.4533-36.
B. Nayar (1989) India’s Mixed Economy: The Role of Ideology and its Development, Bombay: Popular Prakashan.
F. Frankel, (2005) ‘Crisis of National Economic Planning’, in India’s Political Economy (1947-2004): The Gradual Revolution, Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp. 93-340.
L. Fernandes, (2007) India’s New Middle Class: Democratic Politics in an Era of Economic Reform, Delhi: Oxford University Press.
S. Shyam, (2003) ‘Organizing the Unorganized’, in Seminar, [Footloose Labour: A Symposium on Livelihood Struggles of the Informal Workforce, 531] pp. 47-53.
S. Chowdhury, (2007) ‘Globalization and Labour’, in B. Nayar (ed.) Globalization and Politics in India, Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp.516-526.
V. Chibber, (2005) ‘From Class Compromise to Class Accommodation: Labor’s Incorporation into the Indian Political Economy’ in R. Ray, and M.F. Katzenstein (eds.) SocialMovements in India, Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp 32-60.
III. Agrarian development strategy and its impact on social structure

Essential Readings:


A. Desai, (ed.), (1986) Agrarian Struggles in India After Independence, Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp. xi-xxxvi
F. Frankel, (1971) India’s Green Revolution: Economic Gains and Political Costs, Princeton and New Jersey: Princeton University Press.
F. Frankel, (2009) Harvesting Despair: Agrarian Crisis in India, Delhi: Perspectives, pp. 161-169.


  1. Harriss, (2006) ‘Local Power and the Agrarian Political Economy’ in Harriss, J. (ed) Power Matters: Essays on Institutions, Politics, and Society in India, Delhi. Oxford University Press, pp. 29-32.




  1. Suri, (2006) ‘Political economy of Agrarian Distress’, in Economic and Political Weekly, XLI(16) pp. 1523-1529.

P. Joshi, (1979) Land Reforms in India: Trends and Perspectives, New Delhi: Allied publishers.


P. Appu, (1974) ‘Agrarian Structure and Rural Development’, in Economic and Political Weekly, IX (39), pp.70 – 75.
P. Sainath, (2010) ‘Agrarian Crisis and Farmers’, Suicide’, Occasional Publication22, New Delhi: India International Centre (IIC).
M. Sidhu, (2010) ‘Globalisation vis-à-vis Agrarian Crisis in India’, in R. Deshpande and S. Arora, (eds.) Agrarian Crises and Farmer Suicides (Land Reforms in India Series), New Delhi: Sage, pp. 149-174.
V. Sridhar, (2006) ‘Why Do Farmers Commit Suicide? The Case Study of Andhra Pradesh’, in

Economic and Political Weekly, XLI (16).
IV. Social Movements

Essential Readings:


G. Haragopal, and K. Balagopal, (1998) ‘Civil Liberties Movement and the State in India’, in M. Mohanty, P. Mukherji and O. Tornquist, (eds.) People’s Rights: Social Movements and the State in the Third World New Delhi: Sage, pp. 353-371.
M. Mohanty, (2002) ‘The Changing Definition of Rights in India’, in S. Patel, J. Bagchi, and K. Raj (eds.) Thinking Social Sciences in India: Essays in Honour of Alice Thorner Patel, New Delhi: Sage.
G. Omvedt, (2012) ‘The Anti-caste Movement and the Discourse of Power’, in N. Jayal (ed.) Democracy in India, New Delhi: Oxford India Paperbacks, sixth impression, pp.481-508.
P. Ramana, (2011) ‘India’s Maoist Insurgency: Evolution, Current Trends and Responses’, in M. Kugelman (ed.) India’s Contemporary Security Challenges, Woodrow Wilson International Centre for Scholars Asia Programme, Washington D.C., pp.29-47.


  1. Ray, (1996) ‘Civil Rights Movement and Social Struggle in India’, in Economic and Political Weekly, XXI (28). pp. 1202-1205.




  1. Roy, (2010) ‘The Women’s Movement’, in N.Jayal and P. Mehta (eds.) The Oxford Companion to Politics in India, New Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp.409-422.

N. Sundar, (2011) ‘At War with Oneself: Constructing Naxalism as India’s Biggest Security Threat’, in M. Kugelman (ed.) India’s Contemporary Security Challenges, Woodrow Wilson International Centre for Scholars Asia Programme, Washington D.C., pp.46-68.


M. Weiner, (2001) ‘The Struggle for Equality: Caste in Indian Politics’, in A.Kohli. (ed.) The Success of India’s Democracy, Cambridge: CUP, pp.193-225.
S. Sinha, (2002) ‘Tribal Solidarity Movements in India: A Review’, in G. Shah. (ed.) Social Movements and the State, New Delhi: Sage, pp. 251-266.
Additional Readings:
S. Banerjee, (1986) ‘Naxalbari in Desai’, in A.R. (ed.) Agrarian Struggles in India After Independence. Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp.566-588.
B. Nayar, (ed.), (2007) Globalization and Politics in India. Delhi: Oxford University Press. S. Roy and K. Debal, (2004) Peasant Movements in Post-Colonial India: Dynamics of Mobilization and Identity, Delhi: Sage.
G. Omvedt, (1983) Reinventing Revolution, New Social Movements and the Socialist Tradition in India, New York: Sharpe.
G. Shah, (ed.), (2002) Social Movements and the State. New Delhi: Sage Publications.
G. Shah, (2004) Social Movements in India: A Review of Literature, New Delhi: Sage Publications.
G. Rath, (ed.), (2006) Tribal development in India: The Contemporary Debate, New Delhi: Sage Publications.


  1. Harris, (2009) Power Matters: Essays on Institutions, Politics, and Society in India. Delhi: Oxford University press.




  1. Suresh, (ed.), (1982) Tribal Movements in India, Vol I and II, New Delhi: Manohar (emphasis on the introductory chapter).




  1. Mohanty, P. Mukherji and O.Tornquist, (1998) People’s Rights: Social Movements and the State in the Third World. New Delhi: Sage Publications.




  1. Rao, (ed.), (1978) Social Movements in India, Vol. 2, Delhi: Manohar.




  1. Jayal, and P. Mehta, (eds.), (2010) The Oxford Companion to Politics in India, Delhi:Oxford University Press.

P. Bardhan, (2005) The Political Economy of Development in India, 6th impression, Delhi: Oxford University Press.


R. Mukherji, (ed.), (2007) India’s Economic Transition: The Politics of Reforms, Delhi: Oxford University Press.
R, Ray and M. Katzenstein, (eds.), (2005) Social Movements in India, Delhi: Oxford University Press.
S. Chakravarty, (1987) Development Planning: The Indian Experience, Delhi: Oxford University Press.
SEMESTER-IV

3.India’s Foreign Policy in a globalizing world


Course objective: This course’s objective is to teach students the domestic sources and the structural constraints on the genesis, evolution and practice of India’s foreign policy. The endeavour is to highlight integral linkages between the ‘domestic’ and the ‘international’ aspects of India’s foreign policy by stressing on the shifts in its domestic identity and the corresponding changes at the international level. Students will be instructed on India’s shifting identity as a postcolonial state to the contemporary dynamics of India attempting to carve its identity as an ‘aspiring power’. India’s evolving relations with the superpowers during the Cold War and after, bargaining strategy and positioning in international climate change negotiations, international economic governance, international terrorism and the United Nations facilitate an understanding of the changing positions and development of India’s role as a global player since independence.


Unit-I___India’s_Foreign_Policy:_From_a_Postcolonial_State_to_an_Aspiring_Global_Power_(7_lectures)__Unit-II'>Unit-I


  1. India’s Foreign Policy: From a Postcolonial State to an Aspiring Global Power (7 lectures)

Unit-II

  1. India’s Relations with the USA, USSR/Russia and China

Unit-III

  1. Unit-IV'>India in South Asia: Debating Regional Strategies (9 lectures)

Unit-IV

V. India’s Negotiating Style and Strategies: Trade, Environment and Security Regimes (11 lectures)

Unit-V

VI. India in the Contemporary Multipolar World (6 lectures)

READING LIST
I. India’s Foreign Policy: from a Postcolonial State to an Aspiring Global Power
Essential Readings:
S. Ganguly and M. Pardesi, (2009) ‘Explaining Sixty Years of India’s Foreign Policy’, in India Review, Vol. 8 (1), pp. 4–19.

Ch. Ogden, (2011) ‘International ‘Aspirations’ of a Rising Power’, in David Scott (ed.),



Handbook of India’s International Relations, London: Routeledge, pp.3-31
W. Anderson, (2011) ‘Domestic Roots of Indian Foreign Policy’, in W. Anderson, Trysts with Democracy: Political Practice in South Asia, Anthem Press: University Publishing Online.
Additional Reading:

J. Bandhopadhyaya, (1970) The Making Of India's Foreign Policy, New Delhi: Allied

Publishers.
II: India’s Relations with the USA and USSR/Russia

Essential Readings:


S. Mehrotra, (1990) ‘Indo-Soviet Economic Relations: Geopolitical and Ideological Factors’, in India and the Soviet Union: Trade and Technology Transfer, Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, pp. 8-28.

R. Hathaway, (2003) ‘The US-India Courtship: From Clinton to Bush’, in S. Ganguly (ed.),



India as an Emerging Power, Frank Cass: Portland.
A. Singh, (1995) ‘India's Relations with Russia and Central Asia’, in International Affairs, Vol. 71 (1): 69-81.
M. Zafar, (1984), ‘Chapter 1’, in India and the Superpowers: India's Political Relations with the Superpowers in the 1970s, Dhaka, University Press.
Additional Readings:

H. Pant, (2008) ‘The U.S.-India Entente: From Estrangement to Engagement’, in H. Pant,


Contemporary Debates in Indian Foreign and Security Policy: India Negotiates Its Rise in the International System, Palgrave Macmillan: London.
D. Mistry, (2006) ‘Diplomacy, Domestic Politics, and the U.S.-India Nuclear Agreement’, in Asian Survey, Vol. 46 (5), pp. 675-698.
III: India’s Engagements with China

Essential Readings:


H. Pant, (2011) ‘India’s Relations with China’, in D. Scott (ed.), Handbook of India’s International Relations, London: Routeledge, pp. 233-242.
A. Tellis and S. Mirski, (2013) ‘Introduction’, in A. Tellis and S. Mirski (eds.), Crux of Asia: China, India, and the Emerging Global Order, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace: Washington.
S. Raghavan, (2013) ‘Stability in Southern Asia: India’s Perspective’, in A. Tellis and S. Mirski (eds.), Crux of Asia: China, India, and the Emerging Global Order, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace: Washington.

Additional Reading:

Li Li, (2013) ‘Stability in Southern Asia: China’s Perspective’, in A. Tellis and S. Mirski (eds.),
Crux of Asia: China, India, and the Emerging Global Order, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace: Washington.
IV: India in South Asia: Debating Regional Strategies

Essential Readings:


S. Muni, (2003) ‘Problem Areas in India’s Neighbourhood Policy’, in South Asian Survey, Vol. 10 (2), pp. 185-196.

S. Cohen, (2002) India: Emerging Power, Brookings Institution Press.V. Sood, (2009) ‘India and regional security interests’, in Alyssa Ayres and C. Raja Mohan (eds), Power realignments in Asia: China, India, and the United States, New Delhi: Sage.


Additional Readings:


M. Pardesi, (2005) ‘Deducing India’s Grand Strategy of Regional Hegemony from Historical and Conceptual Perspectives’, IDSS Working Paper, 76, Available at http://www.rsis.edu.sg/publications/WorkingPapers/WP76.pdf, Accessed: 19.04.2013.
D. Scott, (2009) ‘India's “Extended Neighbourhood” Concept: Power Projection for a Rising Power’, in India Review, Vol. 8 (2), pp. 107-143

V: India’s Negotiating Style and Strategies: Trade, Environment and Security Regimes

Essential Readings:


S. Cohen, (2002) ‘The World View of India’s Strategic Elite’, in S. Cohen, India: Emerging Power, Brookings Institution Press, pp. 36-65.
A. Narlikar, (2007) ‘All that Glitters is not Gold: India’s Rise to Power’, in Third World Quarterly, Vol. 28 (5) pp. 983 – 996.
N. Dubash, (2012) ‘The Politics of Climate Change in India: Narratives of Enquiry and Co-benefits’, Working Paper, New Delhi: Centre for Policy Research.
N. Jayaprakash, (2000) ‘Nuclear Disarmament and India’, in Economic and Political Weekly, Vol. 35 (7), pp. 525-533.

Additional Readings:


P. Bidwai, (2005) ‘A Deplorable Nuclear Bargain’, in Economic and Political Weekly, Vol. 40 (31), pp. 3362-3364.
A. Anant, (2011) ‘India and International Terrorism’, in D. Scott (ed.), Handbook of India’s International Relations, London: Routledge, pp. 266-277.
VI: India in the Contemporary Multipolar World

Essential Readings:


R. Rajgopalan and V. Sahni (2008), ‘India and the Great Powers: Strategic Imperatives, Normative Necessities’, in South Asian Survey, Vol. 15 (1), pp. 5–32.
C. Mohan, (2013) ‘Changing Global Order: India’s Perspective’, in A. Tellis and S. Mirski (eds.), Crux of Asia: China, India, and the Emerging Global Order, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace: Washington.
A. Narlikar, (2006) ‘Peculiar Chauvinism or Strategic Calculation? Explaining the Negotiating Strategy of a Rising India’, in International Affairs, Vol. 82 (1), pp. 59-76.
Additional Reading:
P. Mehta, (2009) ‘Still Under Nehru’s Shadow? The Absence of Foreign Policy Frameworks in India’, in India Review, Vol. 8 (3), pp. 209–233.
Online Resources:
Government of India’s Ministry of External Relations website at http://www.mea.gov.in/ and specially its library which provides online resources at http://mealib.nic.in/
The Council of Foreign Relations has a regularly updated blog on India’s foreign policy: http://www.cfr.org/region/india/ri282 Centre for Policy Research’s blog on IR and strategic affairs though it is not exclusively on India’s foreign policy. http://www.cprindia.org/blog/international- relations-and-security-blog

Institute for Defence Studies and Analyses: http://www.idsa.in/



Research and Information System: www.ris.org.in/
Indian Council of World Affairs: www.icwa.in/ Institute of Peace and Conflict Studies: www.ipcs.org/

Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations: www.icrier.org


SEMESTER-VI

4. Women, Power and Politics
Course objective: This course opens up the question of women’s agency, taking it beyond ‘women’s empowerment’ and focusing on women as radical social agents. It attempts to question the complicity of social structures and relations in gender inequality. This is extended to cover new forms of precarious work and labour under the new economy. Special attention will be paid to feminism as an approach and outlook. The course is divided into broad units, each of which is divided into three sub-units.
Unit-I
I. Groundings (6 weeks)

1. Patriarchy (2 weeks)



  1. Sex-Gender Debates




  1. Public and Private




  1. Power

Unit-II

  1. Feminism (2 weeks)

Unit-III

  1. Family, Community, State (2weeks)

a. Family
b. Community c. State

Unit-IV

II. Movements and Issues (6 weeks)

  1. History of the Women’s Movement in India (2 weeks)


Unit-V

  1. Violence against women (2 weeks)

  2. Work and Labour (2 weeks)

  1. Visible and Invisible work




  1. Reproductive and care work




  1. Sex work

Reading List
I. Groundings

1. Patriarchy

Essential Readings:




  1. Shinde, (1993) ‘Stree Purusha Tulna’, in K. Lalitha and Susie Tharu (eds), Women Writing in India, New Delhi, Oxford University Press, pp. 221-234




  1. Chakravarti, (2001) ‘Pitrasatta Par ek Note’, in S. Arya, N. Menon & J. Lokneeta (eds.)


Naarivaadi Rajneeti: Sangharsh evam Muddey, University of Delhi: Hindi Medium Implementation Board, pp.1-7

a. Sex Gender Debates
Essential Reading:


  1. Geetha, (2002) Gender, Kolkata, Stree, pp. 1-20 b. Public and Private

Essential Reading:


  1. Kosambi, (2007) Crossing the Threshold, New Delhi, Permanent Black, pp. 3-10; 40-46 c. Power

Essential Reading:




  1. Menon, (2008) ‘Power’, in R. Bhargava and A. Acharya (eds), Political Theory: An Introduction, Delhi: Pearson, pp.148-157


2. Feminism
Essential Readings:


  1. Hooks, (2010) ‘Feminism: A Movement to End Sexism’, in C. Mc Cann and S. Kim (eds),


The Feminist Reader: Local and Global Perspectives, New York: Routledge, pp. 51-57
R. Delmar, (2005) ‘What is Feminism?’, in W. Kolmar & F. Bartkowski (eds) Feminist Theory: A Reader, pp. 27-37
3.Family, Community and State

a. Family

Essential Readings:


R. Palriwala, (2008) ‘Economics and Patriliny: Consumption and Authority within the Household’ in M. John. (ed) Women's Studies in India, New Delhi: Penguin, pp. 414-423

b. Community

Essential Reading: U. Chakravarti, (2003) Gendering Caste through a Feminist Len, Kolkata, Stree, pp. 139-159.



c. State

Essential Reading:


C. MacKinnon, ‘The Liberal State’ from Towards a Feminist Theory of State, Available at http://fair-use.org/catharine-mackinnon/toward-a-feminist-theory-of-the-state/chapter-8, Accessed: 19.04.2013.
Additional Readings:
K. Millet, (1968) Sexual Politics, Available at http://www.marxists.org/subject/women/authors/millett-kate/sexual-politics.htm, Accessed: 19.04.2013.
N. Menon (2008) ‘Gender’, in R. Bhargava and A. Acharya (eds), Political Theory: An Introduction, New Delhi: Pearson, pp. 224-233


  1. Hussain, (1988) ‘Sultana’s Dream’, in Sultana’s Dream and Selections from the Secluded Ones – translated by Roushan Jahan, New York: The Feminist Press




  1. Ray ‘Understanding Patriarchy’, Available at http://www.du.ac.in/fileadmin/DU/Academics/course_material/hrge_06.pdf, Accessed: 19.04.2013.




  1. de Beauvoir (1997) Second Sex, London: Vintage.

Saheli Women’s Centre, (2007) Talking Marriage, Caste and Community: Women’s Voices from Within, New Delhi: monograph


II. Movements and Issues

1. History of Women’s Movement in India

Essential Readings:


I. Agnihotri and V. Mazumdar, (1997) ‘Changing the Terms of Political Discourse: Women’s Movement in India, 1970s-1990s’, Economic and Political Weekly, 30 (29), pp. 1869-1878.
R. Kapur, (2012) ‘Hecklers to Power? The Waning of Liberal Rights and Challenges to Feminism in India’, in A. Loomba South Asian Feminisms, Durham and London: Duke University Press, pp. 333-355
2. Violence against Women

Essential Readings:


N. Menon, (2004) ‘Sexual Violence: Escaping the Body’, in Recovering Subversion, New Delhi: Permanent Black, pp. 106-165
3. Work and Labour

  1. Visible and Invisible work

Essential Reading:


P. Swaminathan, (2012) ‘Introduction’, in Women and Work, Hyderabad: Orient Blackswan, pp.1-17


  1. Reproductive and care work

Essential Reading:
J. Tronto, (1996) ‘Care as a Political Concept’, in N. Hirschmann and C. Stephano, Revisioning the Political, Boulder: Westview Press, pp. 139-156


  1. Sex work

Essential Readings:
Darbar Mahila Samanwaya Committee, Kolkata (2011) ‘Why the so-called Immoral Traffic (Preventive) Act of India Should be Repealed’, in P. Kotiswaran, Sex Work, New Delhi, Women Unlimited, pp. 259-262
N. Jameela, (2011) ‘Autobiography of a Sex Worker’, in P. Kotiswaran, Sex Work, New Delhi: Women Unlimited, pp. 225-241
Additional Readings:
C. Zetkin, ‘Proletarian Woman’, Available at http://www.marxists.org/archive/zetkin/1896/10/women.htm, Accessed: 19.04.2013.
F. Engles, Family, Private Property and State, Available at http://readingfromtheleft.com/PDF/EngelsOrigin.pdf, Accessed: 19.04.2013.
J. Ghosh, (2009) Never Done and Poorly Paid: Women’s Work in Globalising India, Delhi: Women Unlimited
Justice Verma Committee Report, Available at http://nlrd.org/womens-rights-initiative/justice-verma-committee-report-download-full-report, Accessed: 19.04.2013.
N. Gandhi and N. Shah, (1992) Issues at Stake – Theory and Practice in the Women’s Movement, New Delhi: Kali for Women.
V. Bryson, (1992) Feminist Political Theory, London: Palgrave-MacMillan, pp. 175-180; 196-200
M. Mies, (1986) ‘Colonisation and Housewifisation’, in Patriarchy and Accumulation on a World Scale London: Zed, pp. 74-111, Available at
http://caringlabor.wordpress.com/2010/12/29/maria-mies-colonization-and-housewifization/, Accessed: 19.04.2013.



  1. Ghadially, (2007) Urban Women in Contemporary India, Delhi: Sage Publications.




  1. Brownmiller, (1975) Against our Wills, New York: Ballantine.

Saheli Women’s Centre (2001) ‘Reproductive Health and Women’s Rights, Sex Selection and feminist response’ in S Arya, N. Menon, J. Lokneeta (eds), Nariwadi Rajneeti, Delhi, pp. 284-306

V. Bryson (2007) Gender and the Politics of Time, Bristol: Polity Press
Readings in Hindi:

D. Mehrotra, (2001) Bhartiya Mahila Andolan: Kal, Aaj aur Kal, Delhi: Books for Change


G. Joshi, (2004) Bharat Mein Stree Asmaanta: Ek Vimarsh, University of Delhi: Hindi Medium Implementation Board
N. Menon (2008) ‘Power’, in R. Bhargava and A. Acharya (eds) Political Theory: An Introduction, New Delhi: Pearson
N. Menon (2008) ‘Gender’, in R. Bhargava and A. Acharya (eds) Political Theory: An Introduction, New Delhi, Pearson


  1. Upadhyay and S. Upadhyay (eds.) (2004) Aaj ka Stree Andolan, Delhi: Shabd Sandhan.

  2. Arya, N. Menon and J. Lokneeta (eds.) (2001) Naarivaadi Rajneeti: Sangharsh evam Muddey, University of Delhi: Hindi Medium Implementation Board.




  1. Ability Enhancement (Skill Based)-2


INDIAN HISTORY AND CULTURE.

CHAIRMAN AND MEMBERS OF BOARD OF STUDIES


  1. KISHORE KUMAR BEHERA – HOD AND CHAIR PERSON

  2. BIJAYA KUMAR BOHIDAR- SUBJECT EXPERT

  3. DR. SABITA RATH- HOD,POL SC,SBRG WOMEN’S COLLEGE

  4. DR(SMT) SUSMITA PATNAIK- INTERNAL MEMBER

  5. HOD, POL SC- BA COLLEGE

  6. HOD, POL SC- GOVT SCIENCE COLLEGE,CHATRAPUR

  7. HOD, POL SC- GOPALPUR COLLEGE

  8. DR(MS) MANASI MOHANTY- ALUMINI






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